or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Zucchini Bread

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Hi!

I'm a once a year baker. I'm so frustrated that I am seeking help with anyone who can help solve my mystery. Please help! I've been baking zucchini bread for probably ten years & sharing with my friends every Christmas. Every year it seems that my list has grown. I probably bake at least 12 loaves every year to take to family, friends, work, etc. Everybody seems to enjoy it so much (which of course makes me feel good). I've used the same recipe that I've always used. We bought a new stove about 2 or 3 years ago, and I've been frustrated ever since. My zucchini bread rises beautifully until the last probably five to ten minutes, then it totally sinks in the middle. Last year I calibrated my oven by putting a thermometer inside & adjusting the temperature accordingly. I used to bake four loaves at a time & they were fine. I have gone back to two loaves at a time, thinking maybe the heat wasn't circulating enough. I have tried adjusting the temperature up & down, I have tried cooking on a different rack level, I have tried convection cooking, and lots of other scenarios. I made sure I bought all new products, such as baking soda & baking powder. I am so frustrated that I'm in tears. My bread used to always turn out perfect. It rose into a nice loaf and I was proud to give it to my friends. It still tastes good, but I'm embarassed about the way it looks & it's just not right. Can someone please help me solve this problem? I don't know what else to do. I don't want to go through all the process any more & end up with something I'm embarassed to give to my friends. Thanks to anyone who can help me.

Susan Ledbetter
post #2 of 7
Moving from Welcome Forum to General Baking forum.....
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #3 of 7
Are the loaves fully cooked in the sunken areas?
Do you have a convection oven?
Tell us about the oven you had before and the oven you have now. Perhaps the temperature in your old oven was off a bit.
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
Reply
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
Reply
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
With my old oven, I just cooked it by the recipe at 350 degrees for 50-60 mins. & it always came out perfect. It was just a regular oven. My new oven is supposed to be an "Accubake" with constant temperature control, but my bread has never been right.
post #5 of 7
Is it uncooked where it is sunken?

I don't like the sound of this "accubake." It's electric, right? Was your old oven gas?

I think you are just going to have to toggle with the temperature a bit more.

Is the sunken top the only difference? Are the sides risen to your liking? Sometimes a sunken top means that the temp is too high.

Are you using any different ingredients? Whole wheat pastry flour? More liquid? How long are you leaving the batter out for?
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
Reply
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
Reply
post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
It seems to be done in the middle, and the sides have risen fine. I haven't changed any ingredients from the original recipe I have used for years. The range is electric, which is the same that I used to have. Maybe I need to have the oven checked to see if it's working properly.
post #7 of 7
So you've already bought a thermometer and calibrated the oven accordingly. It could be the oven, but it's likely other factors too.

On the appliance front, I had an interesting conversation with a guy who is 2nd generation in appliance sales and repair (he does lots of repair). He was explaining to me that it is virtually impossible to get a decent domestic range anymore. That companies have generally figured out that for most people, cooking entails just heating prepared food, that we don't cook heavily the way we used to. (I mean who the heck bakes bread :lol: ) He said the dollars you spend are generally proportional to the cosmetics, such as stainless, stainless handles, sleek design, but oven walls are thinner than they used to be, other elements are not as strong, etc., and he's telling people who really really cook that they may want their old oven around in a basement kitchen or whatever. He said I can forget about large batches of canning on most new stoves, that most new appliances are not made to take that kind of task, and laughed when he saw my collection of huge old stock pots.

But I'm thinking if you've calibrated it for temperature (provided your thermometer is accurate:crazy:), it could also have to do with other factors, and you will have to look at them. (though as one last tip on your oven, I would say preheat for longer than when the oven says it's at temperature).


I think a difference in moisture to flour ratio could also be implicated, your zucchini could be wetter or your flour could be a little different and absorb moisture differently. Can you try a slightly dryer bread, either get a little moisture out of the zucchini or add a little less liquid. Don't overmix, but make it less wet.

Or you could switch to a different loaf, and forget the zucchini. Lemon loaf, carrot cake loaf, something with cranberries, whatnot... the water content of the grated zucchini is more "variable" and will emit moisture as its cooked too, how you grate it will also create variables. Is there anything else in your technique that could be improved? Are you using unsalted butter, and at the right temperature?

Even though it's coincided with the oven, I'm thinking if you've done the temperature calibration it can't just be your oven.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Pastries & Baking