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Soup is not a garbage can.....

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Is it just me or do some chefs use soup as a dumping ground for anything that might, smell bad, look old or be from the party the day before.

I understand that process of food cost and working to use every last spec of food, but if the product is already 2 weeks old and you are now going to cook it AGAIN and keep it another week, that does not make sense in my head.

Your thoughts...


PEACE OUT
post #2 of 11
You should always use the foresight to know what might not get used, and get it used in its prime. If you wait too long, pay for your mistakes.
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How come "dishwasher" is not listed as a choice for culinary experience?

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post #3 of 11
I agree... however... (there's always an "however," isn't there?!) I wouldn't use soup as a 'dumping ground,' but I would re-utilize food in soup, if appropriate. Not to say that I would drop rotten cooler-clean-out debris, but if I can capture some dollars from some otherwise unusable product, I would do that. Every item that comes into the kitchen is purchased. Therefore, if I don't use it, I am throwing away money. Yes, perfect planning would eliminate that from happening, but perfect planning is not always possible.

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Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

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post #4 of 11

"only the pure of heart can make soup" (chinese proverb)

If you wouldn't eat an ingredient on it's own, why the **** would you add it to soup. Perfect way to ruin the soup and your reputation. I work at a country club that sells 40L of soup a day so I am well aware of "dumping things in soup" but honestly, if it isn't good before adding it to the soup, it won't be good in the soup. A chef worth his/her weight should take great pride in their soups, I know I do.
post #5 of 11
I couldn't have said it more eloquently Jim!!!! ;)
post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
thank you, for supporting me on this.

He used flounder that when we cooked it got mushy, and he used it in the bisque.....ugh........ewww......gross
post #7 of 11
Sometimes when you are working for someone, you are learning how not to do things.
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Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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post #8 of 11
When I first started in the business, I remember the empty pickle buckets being in the walkin for all the scrap (minus the "s") to be thrown into. Then once a week (yeah right always seemed to be every two) they were dumped into the big steam kettles for soup. Didn't eat soup for the longest time because of this. So I understand the original thought link.

As I "progressed", I began to use soup as a way to save my costs like kinda like Jim talks about. Left over mashed taters became cream of potato (sometimes with additional flavors), Baked potaoes became another variety, even marinara became the base for something. Sometimes business just wasn't there or something didn't sell the way I wanted it to. Yet, usually only enough was made of the leftovers to last for the shift or maybe the day. If I was doing my job correctly then there wasn't enough to worry about.

Soup, no matter what anyone Chef believes (or believed) was never intended to be a catch all for things that otherwise belonged in a trash heap. If it's not serveable in it's present form then the same should apply if it were an ingredient to soup. Now this doesn't mean that you shouldn't save those shells, bones and such for stocks or bases. It just means I wouldn't rummage the dish table or can for leftovers to use.

Ya draw a line in the sand and then adhere to that. I know economics may dictate where that line moves to from time to time but I would hope we never have to get to a point when we feel in order to make a buck we move that line too far.
post #9 of 11
at work, anything we can salvage at the end of service, is blast chilled and made into soup of the day for the next day, which is not kept after the next day

we dont just use anything though... if there are leeks and potatoes left (probably will be) leek and potato soup...

meat from the day before is again blast chilled and used on the baguette sandwiches thing for lunch service the next day then tossed

theres a fine line between utilizing everything, and just making crud to serve to save your GP (which drops anyway because people send back your rubbish)
post #10 of 11

Stock is often the issue

I worked for a while in a very respected restaurant where during the slower summer season, the chef required that all veg scraps, and i mean all, were thrown into a bucket which subsequently wound up as "aromatics" in the many stocks we made. The stocks then became sauces and soups, all of which suffered in flavor and cloudiness from this silly practice. Yes, keeping food cost down is one of the most important aspects of a chef's duties in keeping the restaurant in the black, but doing so at the expense of flavor and appearence is not worth it. Stocks are the basis for so much yumminess, for lack of a better word, why mess it just to save a couple bucks. Unless of course a sunday special on the menu in a fine restaurant in August is Consome de Garbage
post #11 of 11
Old School is right...and man your first paragraph made me ill...Gross!

Soup is whole nuther art form...takes time and patience...Gawd I love it...
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