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Question about Heavy Cream Powder

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
I recently bought a pound of Heavy Cream Powder online. It did not come with instructions for reconsituting it. I am not able to get in touch with the company. Would any one be able to help me? I would appreciate it.

Thank you,
George
post #2 of 21
depends what level of fat content you want. 40%...50% etc?

Just like milk, cream is fluid because it has moisture...read water.

So, depending on your application, you are the one who should decide how much moisture to add back in.

Less for a good thick alfredo sauce, more if you're going to pour it in your coffee. Play around with a little to see what it gives you, take note of the results and go from there

Cat Man
post #3 of 21
Thread Starter 
The powder I have has a 72% butterfat content. Should I still do as you said?

Thank you,
George
post #4 of 21
yes you should...the remainder of the ingredients should basically be milk solids.

Think of it like butter when you clarify it and let it settle.

Milk solids/moisture on the bottom, fat in the middle, and the salt floats to the top. those 3 ingredients equal butter. The only reason butter has salt is because it's a cheap ingredient.

Must have been expensive to buy, I'm curious what you paid.

Do you not have a fridge?..Why not just buy heavy cream at the store?

Cat Man
post #5 of 21

heavy cream

what possessed you to buy it in the first place?

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #6 of 21

I feel your pain for an actual answer. Why buy it? Because maybe you're a baker who uses heavy cream in small or unpredictable amounts and want a shelf-stable product, am I right? Powdered milk tends to be one cup to three cups water to make three cups milk. Don't know if the cream product's the same way, but if it's 72% and you want a standard 40% heavy cream, seems to me you should add 1.8 X water to it. Three years later I'm guessing you figured it out though. So if you're still on this site, would you mind sharing how it worked out for you? I'm curious.

post #7 of 21

I just purchased a canister of 'heavy cream powder' and it came with no instructions on how much powder to use with how much water.

 

I purchased this because I don't keep heavy cream on hand. I am anxious to use this. Will let you know how it turns out.

 

Wanda

post #8 of 21

Just curious, what's the shelf life on cream powder?

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cat Man View Post

yes you should...the remainder of the ingredients should basically be milk solids.

Think of it like butter when you clarify it and let it settle.

Milk solids/moisture on the bottom, fat in the middle, and the salt floats to the top. those 3 ingredients equal butter. The only reason butter has salt is because it's a cheap ingredient.

Must have been expensive to buy, I'm curious what you paid.

Do you not have a fridge?..Why not just buy heavy cream at the store?

Cat Man


Very informative.. Thanks for the post.

 

post #10 of 21
My friend, i just bought heavy crm powder w/72%Butterfat (online via amazon) by Culinary Essentials from "Chef Wil Golfarb" aka "WILPOWDER" products. anyway- i emailed them as well w/same question- guess they figure since this is being sold to "PROS"...then we should automaticallly KNOW how to mix- w/o directions. i did get e return email from them; albiet brief. i also phoned- and they were corporate- so that was brief too.i was told to mix: 3:1 RATIO ( 3PARTS WARM LIQUID TO 1PART POWDER. product has a shelf life up to 12-18mos opened ; as long as you dont expose it exceeding 80degrees and 70% humidity. just try to keep cool/dry location. mine is in a room that is kept around 72degrees all yr long- so im thinking i'll get approx yr out of it. NOTE: THIS PRODUCT NEEDS NO REFRIGERATION AT ALL. I PROMISE THIS IS TRUE.. I ADDED like half a cup to a gallon of nonfat powdered milk the other day to make it like 2% AND also to improve texture and taste. dear hubby- had NO IDEA he was drinking powdered milk. i even used leftover WHEY LIQUID from making homemade yogurt (from the powdered milk mixed w/regular) and added it also to the milk increasing nutritional content AND mimicking milk flavor further... good luck and enjoy the flexibility and convenience of using powdered items. theyre economical and grandma says they were popular in the depression era as well. -NJchefdelacasa
post #11 of 21

Just passing through reading the posts on powdered cream and milk and thought I'd throw in my 2 cents.  I am setting up a kitchen in a construction camp in Afghanistan.  Access to fresh items other than locally butchered goat or lamb is not exactly recommended.  Vegetables are suspect as they are all grown in night soil and in this part of the world where typhoid and other inconveniences are prevalent it seemed a wise choice to try and find good dried products.  Our eggs happen to come from the Ukraine.  I hope far from Chernobyl.

 

So we are eating powdered eggs, with canned hams, fresh bread, dried potatoes and fresh pastas, keeping our canned goods to a minumum and relying heavily on dried goods.

 

So dried heavy cream and milk is definitely on the list

post #12 of 21

I'm about to buy the heavy cream powder and was wondering if anyone has used it to make pastries or  buttercreams?? 

post #13 of 21
I remember when powdered creamers first came on the market. If I'm remembering correctly the first brand was Coffee Mate. Delish!!! It was real powderd cream. Don't.know the butterfat content but it was used/measured just like todays nasty powdered fake creamer. It was sooo good. Made coffee taste so wonderful. I usr two heaping teaspoons full. It would desolved into the hot coffee and did not cool it down as it was stored in.the cuboard. Never had anything since those days. Been over 50 years since they changed it and made it cheaperand crapy tasting. Most folks now days don't know such a product was ever available. Please reply if you know any history on this product Thx...
post #14 of 21
Coffee-Mate is a great creamer. I have used it for years making a powered chai tea mix. It is still available in many flavors at your local mega mart. smile.gif
post #15 of 21

Oh no. No, the thread is about powdered cream--the stuff that comes from cow's milk and is dehydrated.

 

I challenge you to read and pronounce out loud the ingredient list on "Coffee-Mate". 

Around here it's called "Coffee-bleach"...

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #16 of 21

I call it "The Cow from Dow"

post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post
 

I call it "The Cow from Dow"

:lol:

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by chefbuba View Post
 

I call it "The Cow from Dow"

:lol:


Or, "how Dow nixed the Cow"?

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #19 of 21
Sorry for the above post, I am new with all of this and assumed the person was looking for coffee-mate. My husband and I have been looking for years for a cream that could replace the creamer we use. One that is better for you than coffee- mate. Dry, that is how we stumbled upon this site. Sorry, again frown.gif
post #20 of 21
Can I assume that this is the product that I am looking for. Could you use this in your homemade coco mix as well?
post #21 of 21

Heavy cream is cream with the most butterfat, higher than whipping cream. Heavy cream powder is just that. Cream with the water taken out.

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