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Prime Rib Predicament

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
So we run Prime rib every fri and sat night, now some times we run out so its no big deal, but alot of times we have extra left over, we usually run it as blackened prime rib, so we actually get a better price then fri and sat nights. If we do not sell it on Sunday it ends up getting sliced up for prime rib sandwiches that we offer at the bar.

My question is, does any body have good use that will return the profit needed on prime rib instead of a 8.99 sandwich and fries, we charge 22$ for a king cut of rib just for instance with 2 ala carte sides and of course au jus on the plate.
post #2 of 20
Can you tell me the weight of a king cut?

And the weight size of the two sides?

We do between 16 to 20 Prime rib every two weeks. I have a lot of things we do to turn extra prime into extra dollars. But I need to know weights to pick the correct one.
I am a reduction of my youthful mistakes mixed with the roux of a few adult successes
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I am a reduction of my youthful mistakes mixed with the roux of a few adult successes
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post #3 of 20
Battered and fried cubes. Better than chicken. Spice it up with some dressing. People at the bar will eat anything fried.
post #4 of 20
lol.....fried rare battered cubes of ribeye with horseradish sour cream.....
almost as curious as battered fried quiche, very rich and very tasty......really strange though.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
Our king cut with bone is about 22 oz give or take 2-3(end pieces), as for sides, im not totally sure but for example, our risotto cakes is about 4 oz, and i know most of our sides are right around there.......thank you
post #6 of 20
Prime rib stuffed with sun dried tomatoes, artichoke hearts, roasted red bell peppers, and chevre, then grilled and served with a tomato basil sauce.
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #7 of 20

Portion Size

Hi,
I hope you are watching the portion size of the leftovers!!??
Suggestions:
  • Keep the prime rib rare (pull it out at 110 despite the health dept) so you can reheat it, just have the servers say medium and up, the slow , moist reheat is another trick...
  • Cut smaller rib slices from the leftovers and pair it with a couple prawns to boost the re-sale price
  • Juliennes the chilled prime, make an asian style dressing, sesame etc, pepperse, cilantro etc. put it on some greens and sell it for a lunch special using less meat
  • Roll it into a chili and call it prime rib chili with some clearly evident chunks, just enough to justfy the name, then prime rib chili nachos etc.
  • You could probably fake a carne asada, charring the prime and cutting it appropriately and flanking it with all the cheap sides that go with the dish...
Keep me posted...
I personally cook 1/2 prime on slow days to avoid the problem!! You may consider staggering the cooking so you dont generate too much on the leftover front

Ciao

Nate the Great
post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 
Yeh we do try the half thing, but as im sure you know its always un-predictable, we pull ours out around 125, which to me is to high being that we must reheat it in au jus, and that kills it then. This comes down from the owner not the chef, our chef just got the position and the old chef(the owner) is still in the kitchen alot even on the line some days so he tends to do things his ways and not very open to new things, which can be frustrating at times.
post #9 of 20

prime rib dilemma

we do our prime rib, which we sell a ton of, a little differently in our restaurant..we have an ancient kitchen,in an ancient historic building, with not much in the way of modernization..so, we cook our prime to rare...110 and when we get an order i slice it to order, throw it on the grill and mark..serve with a hot au jus and horesradish dijon sauce(cold)..that way, we avoid alot of waste..i have though made a beef and barley soup or a steak and black bean soup with the ends..or i give it to the staff, or my dog always seems to win out...i'm sure you are still making money when you do your prime rib sandwich for lunch as your portion is smaller..and i bet the cutomers just love it..i think its probably hard to find a sandwich like like anymore

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #10 of 20
No offense, but if you sent me out a slice of prime rib with grill marks on it, you'd be getting it back promptly.
Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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post #11 of 20
The only tip i have is to sub it as something that is already on your menu. Like what was said before, cook to 110 and use leftover as either steak fajitas, quesadillas, or something else that is on your menu. If this Prime rib is done well, this meat will actually be better than other meat due to the nice quality and well cooked piece of meat. But like what was said before, Everybody loves WEIRD stuff that is fried on sundays!!!!!!! Couple it with a beer special and you will sell ALL of it!
post #12 of 20

prime rib dilemma

no offense taken chefjake..its just the only way i can manage to serve the prime rib (any suggestion would be appreciated, though)..we serve 75 to 80 dinners a night, with only me and a dishwasher..the kitchen is a crabcrawl, to say the least..i know its probably not the optimal way to serve prime rib, but people actually love it and say its the best thy've ever had...go figure!
joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #13 of 20
When the beef is at the point of going to the slicer, add roasted commercial grade rib eye to it at a 1/3 kind of ratio. Or serve it for what it's worth.
post #14 of 20

Leftover Prime

I often sigh at the people who want anything well done. However, these people come in handy when it comes to well done prime. I would always reserve last nights prime for well done orders. I would place the slice in a saute pan and add a ladle worth of aus jus and keep it on a very low burner covered. Let the subtle heat slowly bring up the temp. You gdet a better result this way opposed to chucking it into the master batch of aus jus.:chef:
post #15 of 20
I am from New Zealand so I take a guess and say that prime rib is along the same lines as eye fillet......if this be the dase and you have access to a smoker try rolling it in honey and pink peppercorns (lightly crushed) and smoking it then serve with a simple salad of watercress good blue cheese (gorgonzolla is my prefered) toasted walnuts, red onion finely sliced and a red wine vinagrette.
hehe iT was me
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hehe iT was me
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post #16 of 20
I honestly believe that this topic of left over rib has always proven to be a challenge for Chefs and Kitchen Managers alike that happen to have this on the menu of their respective restaurants. It can be a point of controversy for the purist and a cost nightmare for all practicle purposes.

For me, I have worked with it as a special on the weekend nights as well as it on the menu daily, and I do mean daily as in Lunch and dinner.
First off let me tackle the option when it was served as a special.

Primarily for those nights, it was advertised as a First come first served item and done on a Saturday night. This made it easier to special any left over on a Sunday early dinner or lunch menu too. The last place I successfully sold the product was back in western New York State. There I utilized a Bone-in Lip-on 10 and up Export. It was run on weekends and was done in a Frenched fashion (I would hope not to have to explain it in this forum but:rolleyes:... utilizing only the Eye.) The tail was removed and trimmed out (not too much), ground up and thrown in the burger mix. It was first seasoned the night before with a mixture of chopped garlic, coarse salt and fresh cracked pepper. In the morning I would sear it off on the grill (utilizing some of the tail fat to get a good flame and then it was promptly into the sham at 350 for 30 minutes and then slowed to 10 minutes per pound at 225deg. It was typically around 110-115 when we served it and there was only one cut, bone in. There was no portion control and the main goal was to provide a wow factor at the table. You'd be surprised at the type of guest who/whom ordered the, for lack of a better description, "Hunk"o"meat. We started out selling one a night and it wasn't long before we were firing four (the oven capacity) and selling out by 9pm. If on the rare occasion we had a left over, the bones were removed and it was done as a reheat the next day for lunch or as an openface sandwich. I did have the luxury of having an Alto-Sham so it was a simple process of reheating it in the sham. There was seldom a rare offering out of the reheat.

I also shaved it and truned it into a Philly style steak sand, Beef on Wick (Kimmelwick roll. It's a Rochester NY thing), a grilled prime and cheddar sandwich (again shaved but served with a 10yo cheddar on grilled marbled rye) and as a Blackened Roasted Rib as was already stated. The cost % wasn't all too bad and it was a money maker, yet it was better than the soup or stew alternative which is what happened once in a while. It made a good "Family meal alternative on the rare occasion that we needed a morale boost too.

For the places that I served it on the regular menu........ Reheat in the sham only and served as our medium and up cuts. Being as it was the Atlanta area in the 80's that I had the most exposure with it on the daily menu, there was a huge call for it in the medium to well range. So we would often fire an extra rib just to have a reheat. There was a variety of type used from the massive cap-on 109 to the bone off and everything in between.

On the occasion there wasn't a reheat, it was brought to higher temperatures in the oven, basted with au jus and covered with a large piece of kale or leaf lettuce. This was certainly better for presentation than boiling it in the bein Marie of Au jus. I have to admit that (au jus method) drove me nutz when folks would do that!:mad:

Anyhow there was the occasion when weather played a factor in the winter months and we were left with a plethora of left overs. Some times ya just have to suck it up and get what you can out of it. So the same uses as I mentioned above were our only options. Oh yeah there is the option of doing a carved meat station for happy hour. ;) just throw out some horseradish sauce, whole grain mustard sauce and small dinner rolls and watch it go!!!!!:roll:


BTW it surprised me to see kuan and shroomgirl talk about the batter fried version. I thought that was primarily a "Southern thang". We served it with fried pickles too.:lol:
post #17 of 20
The old stand-by, open face sandwich, works well the following day at lunch. With a small bowl of au jus and fries on the side. It works well in the dinning room and really great at the bar. Slice thin and warm slowly.
post #18 of 20

Rib Eye

:chef:Hey,
That sounds great!
FYI:
Prime Rib is a commonly used term for rib eye, sometimes boneless and some times bone in. It is the whole from which rib eye steaks are cut.
It is not always Prime grade, which I never quite understood.
Here, it is generally bought select grade or choice grade, for those without loads of money to buy prime meat.
I buy select and slow cook it and I beleive $5.50@lb compared to $7.50@lb (choice) Seattle, is a noteable savings which the ordinary consumer couldnt tell the dif anyway:blush:.
Plus, I dont have to charge the pimmicun out of them for a slice!
I do mine with a brown sugar rub...
(love to come visit NZ!!)

Nate the Great
post #19 of 20
that would have been Kuan's idea to batter and fry it.....I was just playing along.....my leftovers are usually made into an entree salad with bleu cheese, red onions, baby greens, red grapes and a vinagrette.....or sliced frozen and saved for when the 25 year old college son shows up to fill his freezer.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #20 of 20
If you're getting $22 for 22 ounces with two sides, that's basically $1 per ounce. The bone wieghs probably 6 oz., I would guess. If you serve a 7oz. sandwich with 1 side, for 8.99, your're getting close to if not the same return as you are for the king cut. If you slice the meat thin like for a french dip type sandwich, you can also make use of the end cuts which evens out the loss for not being able to charge for the bone.
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