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Tenderloin preservation/maturation

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
There is a restaurant in my homecity of Zagreb that specializes in steaks called Fort Apache. Anyways, they have a meat maturation/preservation chaimber or a room fridge. And they store the meat there for about 30 days. Does anybody know the conditions in there (air temp, humidity, etc.) and the exact duration for i.e. a tenderloin because I'd like to try that at home?
post #2 of 11
Dryer the better. 38F is good and plenty of air circulation. 21 days is fine.
post #3 of 11
just wanted to say welcome and that I think Zagreb is a most wonderful city. The farmers markets, the one in the part of town (I forget the Croatian name but translates to something like cherry town...) Croatia is such a beautiful country, some very fond times, but really some of the greatest food from farmers markets, really ripe peaches, figs, hand pressed olive oil on Korcula, cepes from the woods, don't get me started... The Adriatic and islands are so beautiful too.
post #4 of 11
Ducatony-

Always nice to hear from somebody from a new area. Hope you will contribute your viewpoint to what goes on here.

Welcome

Mike
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks... BTW, the cherry city is TreĆĄnjevka...:roll:
post #6 of 11
yes, yes that's it! Hvala ljepje!;)
post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
Don't wanna be rude, it's hvala lijepa...:rolleyes:
post #8 of 11
Is it dry aged ? Or wet aged ? Aged under marination ?
http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
Think it's dry
post #10 of 11
Hi and welcome Ducatony,

What Kuan suggested is correct.

Here are additional notes:
Put the meat on a stainless steel rack so that air circulates freely all around it.
Do not have anything touch the surface to create a wet spot.
The meat will dry out on the surface. The thin ends will dry out become waste or used for stock/fond.

The meat should be fresh off the carcass (not previously aged) after the carcass has relaxed after rigor mortis (about 3 days after the slaughter). probably you should get it at a slaughterhouse directly. (I would caution you to age supermarket meat 21 days because it is already aged 14 days or so)

Make sure the meat is not punctured anywhere. (a puncture will introduce bacteria inside a otherwise sterile environment)
No need to age the meat more then 21 days (there is little tenderness or flavour gain after 21 days of dry aging)
Cut away any dry sections before cooking.
When slicing the filet in steak before cooking, throw it away if the meat inside is not purple or any shade of green, dark brown or black.

Luc H.
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #11 of 11
Hang the beef from a string on a hook, The string will dry out so there is no "Wet Spot" Make sure there is plenty of room around the hanging beef to allow proper circulation.:chef:
http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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