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The Classic Omelette

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
In my culinary self-education effort, I started with breakfast, and what's more breakfast than an omelette, right? I've got a couple of questions about 'em though, 'cause if I'm committing myself to learning omelettes, I'm gonna do 'em right (dad would be proud). :chef:

First: are omelettes, classically anyway, supposed to have any browning on the outside? My hunch is that they're not, but I don't know for sure.

Second: I don't like my omelettes with a browned exterior (I think browning makes them tough), yet they insist on coming out browned or too runny. How can I prevent this? As I see it, my options are lowering the heat, putting the eggs in the pan while the butter is still foamy, or using a larger pan so that the eggs are dispersed widely, are thinner, and cook quickly. The Joy of Cooking says that cooking an omelette should be rapid and over high heat, so that makes me reluctant to do the first option, and the second is a direct contradiction of the omelette instructions in the JOC as well. I think the third option might work, but it could counteract the fluffiness factor I'm going for; how fluffy can a really thin omelette be?

Thoughts?
post #2 of 17
The way I was taught to a classical French cuisine omelet is definitely with no brown on the outside and with the finished product being cigar shaped. I work on high heat and it takes about 90 seconds, making for a light moist fluffy omelet that doesn't have a chance to dry out from prolonged exposure to heat. When the pan is almost to the smoke point, add the eggs, shaking the pan and stirring constantly at the same time, like you're making scrambled eggs. When the eggs start to congeal remove from the heat and don't stir to the bottom of the pan but continue to stir and smooth eggs till finished cooking, add your filling, roll and shape, and you're done. If you want the finished product firmer in texture, before rolling, place a lid on the pan and let sit for 15-30 seconds. It is easier to show than to put into words, but hope this helps.
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
so you don't incorporate your filling into the omelette while it's still in the pan? Does this mean you preheat your filling in another pan (assuming it's something besides cheese)? Also, what degree of runny-ness would you classify as acceptable? Obviously it differs from person to person, but is a bit of liquidity okay/safe?
post #4 of 17

"anyone can cook, the trick is knowing when to stop"

French Omlette you need you filling hot in seperate pan. As far as "runniness" you will really have to expirement on when to stop stirring, it would be tough to explain. You def dont wanna see juice oozing from the finished product. I think Julia Child said something like "A omlette is perfectly scrambled eggs wrapped in a blamket of eggs" When you stir quickly during the first part of the cooking you should be trying to creat a small "curd". That is what the interior should resemble. As for the "blanket" of egg on the exterior, you are looking for smooth..smooth...smooth. Both of these aspects are a function, of knowing when to stop. Expect the carry over cooking, and you will have to experiment. You probably cant get the best results from low heat, but starting slow is okay. Good luck on your quest for one the GREATEST things to eat....imho
________________IRONCHEFATL___
How come "dishwasher" is not listed as a choice for culinary experience?

"...the very genesis of our art."
- Escoffier on grilling
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________________IRONCHEFATL___
How come "dishwasher" is not listed as a choice for culinary experience?

"...the very genesis of our art."
- Escoffier on grilling
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post #5 of 17
Another "easy" fix for a runny top is to just place it under the exposed heat of a broiler for about ten seconds. Personally I like slightly runny eggs... but I'm a freak.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #6 of 17
There is a farmers omelette which is browned with fresh herbs incorporated in the eggs and filled with fresh cheese.:chef:
http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
okay so i took another shot at it today, and the first step was using a non-non-stick pan. That is, a regular pan. This allows me to be much more active with the fork in stirring the eggs, as I'm not worrying about whether or not I'm going to scrape the teflon or anything. It brought up another concern though: when the eggs are added to the pan, a base omelette skin forms on the pan. Should I break this up initially when stirring the eggs, or is the omelette "blanket" that forms when eggs initially hit the pan the only omelette "blanket" that is ever formed? My hunch is I should break it up repeatedly, as this'll help prevent browning.
post #8 of 17
First of all get a high temp rubber spatula. As for your question....stir the all the egg in the pan rapidly. Then stop just in time for a smooth bottom to form in the pan. Using a 6" non stick pan is great for 3 egg ommlette.
________________IRONCHEFATL___
How come "dishwasher" is not listed as a choice for culinary experience?

"...the very genesis of our art."
- Escoffier on grilling
Reply
________________IRONCHEFATL___
How come "dishwasher" is not listed as a choice for culinary experience?

"...the very genesis of our art."
- Escoffier on grilling
Reply
post #9 of 17
Use a silicon spatula. Use high heat. Hot pan, cold oil. When you put the eggs in the pan, let the bottom layer cook quickly. Then you scrape a layer off with your spatula and let another layer run into the pan and cook. Repeat until there's hardly any egg left to run into the pan. Allow the final layer to cook. This is your "shell" like Julia says.

Fold in half, then push it up the side of the pan. The fold will not hold, so you will have somewhat of a third. Then slide onto plate, curd side up, and when it's almost slid out, flip the final edge over so you have somewhat of a football shape.
post #10 of 17
Remember...if you are using a non coated pan you have to season the ****
out of it....it should be as if your using some sort of super teflon.....nothing
should stick....it should be shiney and smooth as glass.....fork not recommended....heat resistant spatula a better choice.....very hot pan.....an
ounce of cleared butter or oil.....add the egg and work them in a quick stirring motion......as they become just congealed enough to flip....flip them...
immediately remove pan....add filling....trifold onto a plate in a cigar shape as
mentioned in other posts.....now....that being said....in a high volume restaurant....you end up doing it differently.....teflon pans mostly.....lo melt or
some sort of heat resistent shortening....hot pan, but, not to hot....add eggs...and work it a little slower....flip as soon as eggs congeal....add raw or chilled cooked toppings and/or cheese...pop in the convection or flat oven for about 1 or two minutes.....pull out and plate with one fold...thats kinda the
american version.....for me the only way to do 150 to 200 omelets a shift....pan is not hot so it gives you a little time....of course there are many different ways....using the griddle for example...or mixing the ingredients in with the eggs......rock on!!!!!!!
post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
dang, never heard of flipping an omelette. this could work well.
post #12 of 17
You fold it, then slide it onto a plate, then as it's almost out of the pan you turn the pan and use the edge of the pan to sorta roll the omelet onto the plate so you get a football shape.

It's hard to describe, but once you see it you'll totally get what I mean.
post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 
i get the rolling thing (conceptually at least...I don't have the technique down quite yet), I meant flipping the omelette in the pan, so that both inside and outside have direct contact with the pan.
post #14 of 17
Then it wouldnt be a classic French Omlette.
________________IRONCHEFATL___
How come "dishwasher" is not listed as a choice for culinary experience?

"...the very genesis of our art."
- Escoffier on grilling
Reply
________________IRONCHEFATL___
How come "dishwasher" is not listed as a choice for culinary experience?

"...the very genesis of our art."
- Escoffier on grilling
Reply
post #15 of 17
Agreed. Aberdeen military best has awesome omlettes belive it or not
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by kuan View Post

You fold it, then slide it onto a plate, then as it's almost out of the pan you turn the pan and use the edge of the pan to sorta roll the omelet onto the plate so you get a football shape.

It's hard to describe, but once you see it you'll totally get what I mean.

http://www.latimes.com/videogallery/68350295/Food/Chef-Rory-Herrmann-Shows-How-to-Make-an-Omelet

 

The perfect omelet.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #17 of 17

Search youtube for "Pepin Omelette."  He shows both French classic and country versions.

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