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anyone have a recipe for yeasted cornbread?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I've had them as a nice boule or miche from bakeries on occasion.

Would love to have a good recipe for one, so if you have one, please pass it along. I've come across quite a few, but if you have one that you really like I'd appreciate it.
post #2 of 10
Only ones I'm familiar with aren't true corn breads, but another type of bread with corn or cornmeal added. For instance, have had rye corn breads in the past.

Rye & Injun is the classic example.

Other than that, any cornbread recipe I know uses baking powder and/or baking soda as the leaven.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #3 of 10
It would have to have a well developed gluten for the yeast to raise it. Corn meal has no gluten. So as KYH said, a normal bread with cornmeal added.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys.

BTW corn has low gluten not no gluten. It does make breads difficult to rise.

here's where I'm at with it. The bread I'm after I have had in a couple small towns in Europe, mostly near simple rural village areas. I talked with a baker (but didn't ask enough questions), he said they do at least 2/3 corn, wheat is at the most 1/3. They don't use our typical polenta meal, but a cornmeal that I would say is "medium", part flour particles and part a fine cornmeal, stone ground. Naturally leavened. Amazing tasting.

I have a recipe from the White House in the 1800s that is 2/3 corn : 1/3 wheat, it might be close. I'm not after a pure white bread with crunchy bits of cornmeal, ew. Most other recipes I've seen are either on the sweeter side and/or really enriched, or they're say 50/50 flour corn, or 2/3 flour 1/3 corn.

I'll have to experiment. I have some ideas as to how to do it, but a limited amount of the nice stone ground semi-fine corn flour/meal that is like the stuff they use, so I was hoping someone had a recipe.

BTW KYH don't just about all chemically leavened corn breads have some wheat flour in them? The only one I've had that doesn't is Arkansas Corn Bread, which I love, all cornmeal.
post #5 of 10
>BTW KYH don't just about all chemically leavened [COLOR=#006666! important][FONT=verdana, geneva, lucida, 'lucida grande', arial, helvetica, sans-serif][COLOR=#006666! important][FONT=verdana, geneva, lucida, 'lucida grande', arial, helvetica, sans-serif]corn [/FONT][COLOR=#006666! important][FONT=verdana, geneva, lucida, 'lucida grande', arial, helvetica, sans-serif]breads[/FONT][/COLOR][/FONT][/COLOR][/COLOR] have some wheat flour in them? The only one I've had that doesn't is Arkansas Corn Bread, which I love, all cornmeal.<

I've had, and made, them both ways.

My current favorite, which comes from a small, family-owned restaurant in the hills of southeast Kentucky, uses half & half wheat flour and cornmeal---both self-rising. The recipe's been in that family at least three generations, and possibly longer.

I've been wanting to try Peter Reinhart's recipe, but haven't had a chance. He actually uses more wheat than corn. And it's a real sweet cornbread, judging from the ingredients.

Ya know what we call sweet cornbread down heah? Cake!
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
Yeah KYH, that picture always looked good in BBA, never made it either, said I would when I saw the pic, how long ago was that. I like that it did a room temperature soak in the buttermilk. Plus Reinhart said he threw it in as the only non-yeast bread even though it is not a book about quick breads because it was so darned good. It does sound very sweet at 1/4 cup of sugar, 1/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar, and 2T honey. :eek: (The buttermilk would counteract it a little but man that's a lot of sweetener). I'm not a fan of them that sweet, heck I don't even like the sugary-enhanced sweet corn that's ubiquitous now and tastes like candy.

:lol:

BTW this is a little spendy but nice for that type of cornbread, fresh stone ground organic cornmeal.

The Jenney Gristmill, Plymouth Massachusetts.
post #7 of 10
Everything I'm seeing says no gluten in cornmeal.

Could you point me to a source showing the gluten content of cornmeal because I sure can't find one.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #8 of 10
Funny about grist mills, Stir It Up. They're all over the place, but semi-secret.

On another list we've been discussing them. There's a major one only 30-odd miles from my house, for instance, and I had no idea it was there.

Check out these guys: Weisenberger Mill not only their products but their prices.

Soon as I whip this cold I'm gonna make me a little drive.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
is that cool or what KYH.

We have one about 30 minutes drive away too that still runs on water power. The only sad thing is they only grind one type of flour (organic WW) at their mill. They sell all organic flours, in different varieties, but the others, all their whites and other grains are just buy & sell. They will call me when they do a grind so we can get fresh flour which is nice. Their WW is awesome, too bad they don't do more.

I didn't know til recently that it was such a dangerous thing to mill, that you could blow the place up in an instant if your millstones got too close together and made a spark.

Nice to try to help keep those places in business.



phatch, strictly speaking other gluten containing grains like rye, barley, etc., none have exactly the same type of "gluten" as wheat. Gluten is sort of an umbrella term really, but wheat gluten is different than the "gluten" in other grains. The glutenin and gliadin you get from wheat are wheat thang. In rye, the prolamin is secalin, oats it's avenin, corn it's zein. Corn gluten meal has become popular in organic lawn care as a pre-emergent herbicide. Now I understand even celiacs can eat corn gluten meal, because the zein is not problematic to them the way some others are like gliadin, secalin. In a purist sense one might want gluten to mean only wheat gluten, but "gluten" has come to describe not just wheat gluten but also the very similar proteins in other gluten containing grains like rye for instance. I've learned how rye gluten behaves differently than wheat and am getting much better at making ryes. Wheat gluten is pretty unique for it's breadbaking properties. I've read (or tried to read:rolleyes: ) a couple books on cereal science, I assure you corn gluten is not a snuffleuppagus, it does exist, though it is different than wheat gluten, as are all the other "gluten" containing grains like rye.

Diplomacy says we can both be right, that there's no gluten in corn, or that there is corn gluten. I guess what would be the truest way to say it is that there's no wheat gluten in corn. But there's corn gluten in corn.

OK shut up stir and go bake something:lol:
post #10 of 10
>OK shut up stir and go bake something<

Like the rosemary potato breads that are in the last 20 minutes of proofing, before going into the oven? Eat yer heart out, sweetie. :lol:
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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