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Parmesan Tuile

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hello folks,
been trying to make a savoury parmesan tuile for a cocktail party later this month. I dont have an oven, so i tried baking the parm regg in the salamander. it melts n becomes oily. leave it to cool from the silicon mt n it doesnt really go crisp the way we make tuiles for desserts (with egg whites).
do i need to add something else to the parmesan to make it crisp. all that i've been doing now is sprinkle grated parmesan into a circular mould on a silpat and gratinate it. then cool it off for a minute and shape.
doesnt work.
please help.....
japvir:mad:
post #2 of 10
We used to make these by the hundreds every day as garnish on our Caesar salads and we started out with the same problems. I ended up having to switch to a better grade of cheese to make it come out right. I actually ended up using a shredded pecorino romano that worked very well. The grated never gave me the consistency I was looking for.
It's Good To Be The King!
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It's Good To Be The King!
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post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Chef montelago,
i guess ur right. but the grade of grana padano is something i cant change right now. should i try adding egg whites n cornflour to it to strengthen the tuile. probably adding those would also solve the problem of excessive oil from the melted cheese.
thanks
japvir
post #4 of 10
I have never tried it. I would think that the egg whites would actually hinder the crisping process. Do you have a griddle that you could try making them on? I think you might get a faster, more even cook on them, minimizing the oil separation.
It's Good To Be The King!
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It's Good To Be The King!
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post #5 of 10
Add a little AP flour to the parm.

If you have a bunch of those little tarlette shell molds, even better. Heat the molds on a sheet pan, then sprinkle the flour and parm mixture onto them, and they'll sizzle up and form tuilles almost instantly.

Scoop out carefully with a tiny offset spatula and cool on a paper towel, away from klutzy people and crashing frenetic activity.

[edited to add: this assumes a high quality parmesan which has been very finely grated, thus easy to mix with flour and tap onto the molds using a sieve-like strainer or container]
post #6 of 10
Try combining the parm with some gruyere.

--
Al
post #7 of 10
1. Make sure that it is grated (little sticks and not powdery)
2. Next try straight Parm in a non-stick skillet over the stove, med. high.
3. When it is done slide it out on to bowl or rolling pin or what ever you need to shape it.
4. Hide from wait staff who will gobble all if you let them.
5. Garnish and wait for praise.

If you must use oven try no sil-pat. I have made bulk tuilles on just straight (clean) sheet pans.
"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
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"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
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post #8 of 10
Use fresh grated pecorino or general parmesan (nothing pre-grated). Nonstick teflon pan over low heat. Sprinkle cheese into pan, roll around and dump out the excess. Leave on heat ONLY until all cheese is just melted, then remove and let cool for maybe 10-20 seconds? The most important part is to let it cool, although not completely in order for it to not just melt.
post #9 of 10
love it, great info!
post #10 of 10
+1 on the reggiano...
+1 on the griddle/stovetop pan method...

Make sure that the amount of cheese is just enough to "lightly coat" the bottom of an 8" teflon pan...
One of the problems I have seen with these types of tuiles, is that thicker areas do not crisp properly...

The advantages a "finely shredded" parm will provide are:
1. the ability to spread the layer much thinner, (the length of the shreds will allow binding over a larger surface area...)
2. the shreds will allow for a "nest like", basket appearance...
3. a much crisper texture...

-Omit the flour, as it is not necessary...
-Egg whites will not help...

Add some cracked pepper, herbs, or aromatics to create interest...

Best of Luck!!!
Andrew Nutter C.C.C., C.C.E., F.M.P.
Chef Instructor
IUP Academy of Culinary Arts
Punxsutawney, PA 15767
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Andrew Nutter C.C.C., C.C.E., F.M.P.
Chef Instructor
IUP Academy of Culinary Arts
Punxsutawney, PA 15767
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