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Cuisinart vs. Kitchenaid stand mixers - Page 3

post #61 of 81

I've owned and used Kitchenaid stand mixers, both bottom lock and bowl lift models, for over 20 years and the following sounds more like operator error than a design failure

Quote:
Originally Posted by MariaAdalgisa View Post

Warning: DO NOT BUY THE KITCHEN AID STAND MIXER IF YOU PLAN ON MAKING BREAD DOUGH WITH IT. The bowl is NOT engineered to stay on the base with the force of kneading bread dough, even with less than 6 cups of flour. It bangs around and then flies off. It has gotten worse and worse until now it won't even stay on to mix liquids! It's a tin can PIECE OF JUNK!

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Chef,
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post #62 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeteMcCracken View Post

I've owned and used Kitchenaid stand mixers, both bottom lock and bowl lift models, for over 20 years and the following sounds more like operator error than a design failure

 

Same here. I've made bread with both and never had the bowl come loose while mixing. On the Pro 600 there's a spring latching mechanism at the back that you snap the bowl into. It locks down tight and I've never had it come out.

post #63 of 81

I am one of those ppl who had a large 5qt lift up handle, that the gears just ground & shaved away, & pieces of steal came out the top. I sent it back to be repaired, it came back to me, worse than it left. & they said it was fixed. So thank god i still have my old original kitchenAid. When that goes I will purchase a different Mfg. confused.gif

post #64 of 81

Mmm..I've been doing bread and pizza dough in a "pro" 5 qt on a weekly basis for about 5 years now.  No problems

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #65 of 81

KitchenAid will replace all plastic gearboxes with metal ones. They realized the design flaw and will extend the warranty to cover this flaw.

post #66 of 81

Many users experienced the gear box failure after heavy use. [i.e., bread dough]. So much so, that KA decided to extend the warranty to cover replacing the gearbox. The gears have always been metal on the Pro model, but the box that holds all the gears in place was switched to plastic for a time, and that design didn't hold up, so they have changed back.

post #67 of 81

The use of plastic gears may not be intended to save manufacturing cost.

 

For appliances which use high-speed, high-powered universal motors, plastic gears have the advantage of reducing initial shock as well as reducing operating noise.

 

Some mixer speed controls incorporate "soft start", which can improve durability of all moving parts. Also to reduce initial splashing.

 

dcarch

post #68 of 81

Well, after two times going back to KitchenAid I  said that's it. I will purchase another brand. I gave my stand mixer AWAY.. bounce.gif

post #69 of 81

I have an older Cuisinart mixer that I love more than my new Kitchen Aid 5 qt Artisan. The bottom of the bowl is wider as is the top and I just find it easier to work with.  The Cuisinart seems to have more power and doesn't sound like it is 'struggling'.  I also like the fact that all the controls are on the front vs. the slide bar on the back of the Kitchen Aid to raise the beater.  I will continue to use my Cuisinart at my primary residence and take my brand new Kitchen Aid to the place that I go to occasionally.  Cuisinart has my vote!  Heard negative reviews on the Kitchen Aid 13 cup food processor as well.

post #70 of 81

We have had a dozen or so Kitchen Aid machines come though our shop,

gears worn out most of the time,repair Cost $80-$100. We recommend a

30Qt. Minimum for Pizza Dough.We also advise restaurant owner's to be

covered by Insurance/OSHA Machines most have electrical ground and be

NSF approved.Someone gets shocked or worse the owner is responsible,

seen it happen...Tim Beaver NCFSP

post #71 of 81
I agree. I went through two 610 Williams-Sonoma models. They just can't take the strain of bread dough. I bought an Ankarsrum original for bread and dough, and I am very happy with it. Quiet, powerful, and makes a great dough. I picked up a Costco KA 550 for about $275 on sale - same as the 610 but with a 5.5 quart bowl, solely to run the KA pasta attachments I invested in.
post #72 of 81

A very important (NEGATIVE) issue with the Cuisinart product is the non-stick coating on the mixer paddles.  This coating slowly wears off - presumably leaving a quantity of it in the food you are mixing.  I only discovered this when my 5 year old was helping me make cookies and wiped his fingers on the paddle - they came away with BLACK streaks.  Upon wiping the paddle with a white cloth, I discovered that the source of the black was the coating on the paddle wiping off onto the cloth.  Upon inspection of the paddle, I saw that most of the coating had worn off.  When I contacted Cuisinart, they told me the price for a new paddle.  They had no answer to my question regarding what exactly the coating was & if it was edible - I doubt it!!!  I have stopped using the mixer and will replace it with a Kitchen Aid which has enamelled cast iron paddles.

post #73 of 81

I don't think the paddles or doughhook for the K.A are enameled cast iron.  Every one I've used is cast aluminum with a vinyl coating on it, and I've been using Kitchen aid for close to 30 years now...

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #74 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by foodpump View Post
 

I don't think the paddles or doughhook for the K.A are enameled cast iron.  Every one I've used is cast aluminum with a vinyl coating on it, and I've been using Kitchen aid for close to 30 years now...

I tend to agree, I have just been given one (Artisan?) because the plastic was coming off into the food and it is definately not iron inside.

I plan to peel it all off before I use it :-)

post #75 of 81

Guess what? KitchenAid has not resolved the problem with their mixers. My less than two years old Professional 600 ground up, it's gears quite nicely while trying to mix

a batch of bread dough using only 5 cups of flour. 

post #76 of 81

I am sorry but I find your comment about kitchenaid completely wrong. I have my kitchenaid for over 30 years and it is still running strong. Recently I purchased a new one because I wanted a new color and found it to be as great as my original machine. I have had it for 5 years now and have had no problems with it.

post #77 of 81

Even though these posts are pretty old, I just have to add my two cents. I bought a Kitchenaid professional (600 I think) in 2007. It lasted two years of minimal use before the gear shaft went out. I bought the same Kitchenaid again thinking that I must have had a dud. It lasted barely over a year of regular use. Again it was the gear shaft that got wobbly so the beater knocked against the bowl. For one, I don't think they make them like they use to. Two, if you are a light user and are beating cream, making cookies and the occasional loaf of bread, you'll probably be happy. If you are a home bread baker who bakes a couple loaves weekly, this is not the mixer for you!  I was also very unhappy with the customer service. Paying to ship the machine back to the company from Alaska was not a feasible option. And the one year warranty had just expired. I will never buy a Kitchenaid anything again - despite having all the bowls and accessories that the first two came with. I just ran across this forum researching other mixers. Still have to decide between the Cuisinart or Viking or ? The Electrolux is out of my budget.

post #78 of 81

For kneading bread, use your hands.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #79 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post
 

For kneading bread, use your hands.


I totally agree.

Become one with the dough.

Nothing like kneading until you get that silky smooth texture.

A Zen like experience.

 

Home size stand mixers are not meant for production size batches of bread.

At that point I would be lookin' around for a Hobart.

 

mimi

post #80 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post
 


I totally agree.

...........................Nothing like kneading until you get that silky smooth texture.............

 

Home size stand mixers are not meant for production size batches of bread.

At that point I would be lookin' around for a Hobart.

 

mimi

 

Gluten forms spontaneously which is the reason why all of my breads are kneaded for less than a minute.  Kneading, however, evens-up the hydration.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #81 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

 


I totally agree.
...........................Nothing like kneading until you get that silky smooth texture.............

Home size stand mixers are not meant for production size batches of bread.
At that point I would be lookin' around for a Hobart.

mimi

Gluten forms spontaneously which is the reason why all of my breads are kneaded for less than a minute.  Kneading, however, evens-up the hydration.
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokopuffs View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by flipflopgirl View Post

 
Totally forgot you are heavily into the super hydrated artisan bread that is so popular right now.
I like it as well...... who could resist the lure of the signature super crispy crust and the chewy texture.
In fact it was you who answered my noob questions re my first loaves.

But don't you ever get a craving for a light and fluffy dinner roll or a Pullman loaf for a dozen sandwiches destined for the family picnic basket?

I do and for those results you must knead ;-)

mimi
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