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biscotti turned crumbly

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hi,

I made some biscotti and it was suppose to bake at 350 for 40minutes. I baked mine in a dark cookie sheet for 30 minutes b/c it was burning on the bottom.
It says bake until light color for 40 min, then cool 30 min. Then slice into 1/2 to 3/4 inch sliced. Then bake another 10 min until golden brown.

Well, it turned really brown before the required cooking time, and I stuck it in the freezer to speed up the cooling time so I could slice it. The dough was baked as a log shape (13 and 3 inch). My biscotti did not give neat slices, it crumbled and broke. I had to slice it really thick. I was only able to get 6 decent pieces. Please help!
vale
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vale
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post #2 of 15
post your recipe.. but it sounds like you should use a lighter colored pan. and probably bake it less at first.
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 

biscotti recipe

I used the Food Network Every day Italian

1 stick butter, soften
3/4 cup sugar
2 cups flour
2 eggs
1.5 tsp baking powder
slivered almonds
raisins


The steps are the usual: cream butter and sugar, add eggs, blend in flour and the nuts and mixins. form a long log (13x 3 in) and bake 40mins at 350 degrees. Cool 30 min. Slice diagonally 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch thick. Bake another 10 min until golden brown.


I think I did not let it cool enough before slicing, so it was crumbly. Also I may divide the dough into 2 logs to minimize breakage.
vale
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vale
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post #4 of 15
PC, IMO a 40 minute bake at 350 is not a good plan.

I usually do the first bake at 325, the time is more like 25 minutes or so.

It is also not good to put them in the freezer, I take it you were trying to cool overbaked biscotti and did that as an emergency measure, but don't do it next time.

thought I would post this link to a recipe, sort of seasonal

Healthy Recipes - Healthy Eating - Cranberry-Pistachio Biscotti

they seem to have ripped it off verbatim from Gourmet magazine and didn't give credit, I recall using that recipe a few years back, for cranberry pistachio biscotti, which are nice for the season, they work with a little half dip in white chocolate (to make up for the fact that they have no butter;)). Gourmet magazine does an egg wash, other than that same recipe.

Better luck next time, I would suggest you cruise through some recipes and forget that one, and focus in on some with less overbaking on the first bake.
post #5 of 15
speaking of everyday italian.... i dont think giada is worthy of a show. i dont think her skills are as good as she thinks they are . thats just my opinion tho.

anyhow, i'd try the recipe posted above..
post #6 of 15
HEY STIR IT UP!!!! We are in exact agreement!!!:beer::smoking:
________________IRONCHEFATL___
How come "dishwasher" is not listed as a choice for culinary experience?

"...the very genesis of our art."
- Escoffier on grilling
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________________IRONCHEFATL___
How come "dishwasher" is not listed as a choice for culinary experience?

"...the very genesis of our art."
- Escoffier on grilling
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post #7 of 15
It says soften butter . with mine, I heat to melt the butter.then when cooled down all it to the sugar.
post #8 of 15
melt your butter , then mix with the sugar. add aggs. then combine the flour and baking powder, and flavors.mix for a few seconds. should be a soft dough.
post #9 of 15

A tip

I have had problems with certain biscotti recipes yielding a product that is crumbly right out of the oven, but if I let it cool, wrap it in plastic for a day, and refrigerate it, the moisture within the product tends to penetrate the crust, making them easy to slice cleanly. It's just a little trick I've learned over the years.
post #10 of 15
LOL what a concept IronChef, I'll drink to that too :beer:

Good tips here. Momoreg, you can also wrap them in a tea towel, single layer, while they're cooling, you might get a similar effect, and then don't have to wait a day for the 2nd firing. LOL I use old sugar bags, am I dating myself :eek: :blush: .
post #11 of 15
I've found that lightly misting the biscotti log with water before slicing really helps to keep the crumbling to a minimum. The second cooking dries the slices up nicely.
post #12 of 15
Hi Everyone,

I'm new here, and somewhat new to biscotti. I just made them myself for the frist time the other day. I recipe I followed was for a traditional Tuscan biscotti with only almonds (they call them "cantucci" o "giottini"). And it had just flour, sugar, eggs, pinch of salt, some baking powder, and ground and chopped unblanced almonds (and I added some almond extract for more flavor). It called for no butter, and perhaps that's why yours is crumbling more (like a butter cookie texture). When I cut mine they didn't crumble really at all, just a little around the ends sometimes, but basically they were easy to work with, and I cut them pretty thin.

Perhaps you'd have more luck without the butter.
-Joe
post #13 of 15
That's been my experience the two times I've attempted these. Just to say you're not alone with this problem.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #14 of 15
I’ve done biscotti a bunch. The biggest trick I ever learned was using an electric knife to slice. It slices prettier, easier and with way less breakage and crumbling, no matter what the recipe is. Considering that you can pick up an adequate “biscotti cutting” electric knife for around $10-15, if you don’t have one, pick one up.
post #15 of 15
I have always found that my biscotti cut with less crumbling if I cut them while still warm. Not hot, but warm.
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