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Culinary Herbs and its usage

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Hi Chefs,
I wonder anyone has any ideas or experience to share cookng with his/her favourite herbs? I particularly like to use Basil in Spaghetti Alio Olio as well s for seafood dishes. I heard abt sage, chervil and lavender in cooking too. I look forward to hearing your input?

Thanks
"The truth cook hold in his palm the happiness of mankind", quote Normal Douglas, South Wind.
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"The truth cook hold in his palm the happiness of mankind", quote Normal Douglas, South Wind.
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post #2 of 18

Rosemary Poached Pear

Did a rosemary poached pear for a final course in a wine dinner several years ago. Went over really well, Cilantro Simple Syrup is another interesting garnish for a plate.
post #3 of 18
Basil with panna cotta is MAGICAL. I find sweet herbs and flowers (most prominent of which is mint) are great for adding a refreshing note to sweets.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #4 of 18
thyme, rosemary, bay, orange zest are used extensively in my cooking.....braises, red meats, some poultry....

fresh basil in Italian....usually have pesto in the freezer for multiple applications

Oregano (different varieties) for Greek (mid-eastern) and Mexican

tarragon, dillweed, lemon zest, parsley, chives or scallions for chicken or seafood.

basil and pineapple go well together.

Thai basil in springrolls or Pho

Peppercorns/ground in almost anything

Cinnamon in sweet and savory

oops migrated into spices.....

lemon verbena, lemon grass, mint, basil and thyme are plants in my yard.....
citrus is used as a flavor boost in many recipes both savory and sweet.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 

Culinary herbs

Thanks Chefs for sharing.
"The truth cook hold in his palm the happiness of mankind", quote Normal Douglas, South Wind.
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"The truth cook hold in his palm the happiness of mankind", quote Normal Douglas, South Wind.
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post #6 of 18
I can't live without garlic, curry, chervil and herbs parisienne. The last can transform even Campbell's chicken noodle soup. Kind of hard to find though, you might have to mail order it. I get mine from Penzey's. I also use a lot of Penzey's sate seasoning. It's an excellent blend, good on meats and eggs. Speaking of Penzey's, their catalogue is an education in itself on herbs and spices. It's a full color catalogue with extensive information on sources and uses for their products. If you're a little weak on knowing what to use with what, this is the tool for you. You can contact Penzey's on line and they will send you a catalogue. They also have stores in Madison, WI and St. Paul, MN. They have a couple of other stores besides, but I'm not sure where.
post #7 of 18
that is correctly "Aio e Oio" FYI. ;)

ouch, that was like nails on a chalkboard to me, pet peeve.
post #8 of 18
Actually I'm pretty sure it's aglio e olio.
:D
post #9 of 18
Anneke is correct. This is an example of why maybe we should just stick to the English version... garlic and oil. Much easier to remember.:rolleyes:
post #10 of 18
Sage with veal - saltimbocca
Rosemary and garlic with lamb
Bay leaves with any red meat stew/braise/pot roast
Bay leaves in pumpkin soup & other veg soups
Ginger with fish, asian meals, with pumpkin soup
Mint with peas, lamb gravy, new potatoes in butter
Parsley in sooo many things - I prefer curly leaf, none of this flat leaf nonsense (ducking! lol)
Garlic with almost anything savoury....no vampires near my place :)
Chives in mashed potato, yoghurt dressings
Spring onion tips in many salads, sandwiches and asian cooking

The list is endless....these are a few of my favs
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #11 of 18
I love using thyme it is so versatile and adds complexity and depth to almost any meat or vegetable. Also, I recently discovered basil with strawberries, it may sound odd but I urge you to try it.
post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 

Rosemary Poached pear

You poach the pear with red wine and rosemary to get a tinge of the rosemary's flavour?
"The truth cook hold in his palm the happiness of mankind", quote Normal Douglas, South Wind.
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"The truth cook hold in his palm the happiness of mankind", quote Normal Douglas, South Wind.
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post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
You use as garnish or blend and incorporate together with cream, yoghurt and gelatine to let it set?
"The truth cook hold in his palm the happiness of mankind", quote Normal Douglas, South Wind.
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"The truth cook hold in his palm the happiness of mankind", quote Normal Douglas, South Wind.
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post #14 of 18
Nope, and you can ask Marcella Hazan if you don't believe me.

It's a Roman dish, "Aio e Oio" is actually the name for the dish. It takes some doing to learn to say it properly.

Sorry Anneke and greyeaglem. You can have an "expresso" on me.:lol: Or some brush-etta.:eek:
post #15 of 18
You're both right. It's aio e oio in the dialect of Italian spoken in Rome. Aglio e olio would be a more proper way of saying it, I'm guessing.
Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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post #16 of 18

I Like....

I like cinnamon, clove and allspice in ragu. Lay it in there HEAVY... like a pumpkin pie. It is delicious. Also, don't skim the fat when you brown the meat... just add a little roux and let the fat do it's magic. But, HEAVY on the pie spices. !!!!!!! Delicious. I always keep a few quarts in the deep freezer because it is a **** of a nice thing to bust out when you are not wanting to cook in the middle of the night.
post #17 of 18
I actualy used the chardonnay I was paring the dish with. Then just the fronds of the rosemary, no stems, first batch was a little bitter. Ang go easy on the rosemary, can get strong and treally overpower pear and wine.
post #18 of 18
I was lucky enough to work for some rich and very famous people in spain last year with over 500 acres of olive groves and gardens I found wild thyme, wild rosemary and juniper berries wonderful with fresh grilled chicken.
steve masterchefinfrance
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