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LCB tuition in Dallas

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Just FYI - I got a phone call from LCB tonight regarding the information I requested on their website. I was informed that although they do not currently offer an Associates Degree program (not allowed yet because they are a new college) they are still LCB and that alone will get you interviews and jobs.

The rep told me that they require a 3 month externship after completed the 19 month course (this seems pretty standard) and the costs of the entire course is $33K. That last one I almost choked on...$33K for 19 months?!? :crazy::eek::beer:I don't know about that one...

Well, she did say it was the 'Harvard' of culinary schools...

Cheers,
TableBread
~TableBread
I can almost always be found in the kitchen, everything else can be found here: http://tablebread.blogspot.com
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~TableBread
I can almost always be found in the kitchen, everything else can be found here: http://tablebread.blogspot.com
Reply
post #2 of 10
This is gonna get fun now. Out of that 33 k the "rep" will take a hefty slice, so you'd better get an answering machine for your phone, because the Rep won't leave you alone until you sign on the dotted line or get your family Doctor to send in a phony death certificate.

"Harvard", huh? I guess CIA and J&W are Kindergartens, albeit with far longer curriculums. Gotta say that "associates degree" still make the hairs on my back stand up. Always thought only Universities could offer degrees, Colleges could only offer diplomas and certificates, and always thought degrees didn't apply to trades. Guess I must be wrong.

Check out the local Colleges, if you don't now, You'll wish you had later.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
I told the rep that my concern about the length of training and the cost really mimicked the techniques of a trade school and that was definitely NOT what I wanted. I currently work in the IT world and guys with 'technical' degrees are dead in the water before they begin. She assured me that 'LCB' is NOT a trade school it is a world wide institution.
What also alarmed me was that she said "not everyone is accepted". Again, it has been my experience that when this line is used it's to close the sale. The only ones I've seen not get accepted were the ones that couldn't get financial aid.
I hate to have these thoughts about LCB but it does seem to be a little shady.

IMHO...:rolleyes:
~TableBread
I can almost always be found in the kitchen, everything else can be found here: http://tablebread.blogspot.com
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~TableBread
I can almost always be found in the kitchen, everything else can be found here: http://tablebread.blogspot.com
Reply
post #4 of 10
Baking and cooking NOT a trade....Hmmm kinda makes you wonder bout it, since I figure cooking and baking are the "second oldest trades in the world". I guess farming would be the third....

Keep digging around this site, and others like it. Everyone has a story to tell....
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #5 of 10

Look at Collin County College

I have just taken the position of full time professor in the Culinary Arts Dept at the college.
The program is young and we are working on creating a challanging, high quality and professional course. (with talented professional chefs, with industry experience, teaching the classes)
The pricing and finacial aide will enable you to go one with your life after college without crushing finacial woes.
If I am not mistaken, the cost is about a fraction of the LCB.
:bounce:Look into it!
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
post #6 of 10
I thought something else was the oldest trade! Oh, wait a minute, that's a "Profession."

Shows you where we rank!!! :lol::roll:
post #7 of 10
and continuing to scratch head... if baking and cooking came before farming, what did they cook?

:confused:


molecular?

:roll::crazy:
post #8 of 10
Oh my god.....I have SO much to say about this subject, but I'll try to keep it brief.
I went to a technical college for 2 years. One year was culinary arts, and one year was strictly pastry arts. This was 1990-2. My cost for both programs?
$3000. Yep. $3000.....not freaking $33,000.

My training was very rigorous, and I'm certain, after talking to a lot of grads from CIA, LCB, and Johnson and Wales, that my culinary/pastry training at the technical college was at least as good and thorough as theirs.

In fact, in my 17 years in this business, I have had to work with and hire culinary school grads. Even though I was a "grad" myself, I never entered the workforce with the grandioso attitude that grads seem to now. In fact my instructors at the technical college told us over and over again, that even though we had training in the field and had an edge over other applicants that had no training, we were, in effect, inexperienced pond scum. I entered the workforce with the attitude that I still had much more to learn, and there were experienced chefs out there that I should listen to, and that attitude has served me well. I've LEARNED A LOT....in fact EVEN MORE IN THE WORKFORCE, than I EVER DID IN SCHOOL. School was my stepping stone. I consider $3000 a reasonable price for a stepping stone. $33,000 most certainly is NOT.

Consider this recent experience I had. I was the sole pastry chef at a retail wholesale bakery/cafe operation. I desperately needed an assistant. We had to look for a LONG time to find someone with experience, because I didn't have the time (nor patience) to hire someone with no experience. Finally, out of the blue, we get an app from a girl who'd just moved up from California with her husband. She had recently graduated from the Cordon Bleu program down there. I was very happy to get someone with experience PLUS Cordon Bleu training! Hired her on the spot. Well. She was the biggest let down of my life. She happily told me she graduated at the top of her class. She also told me during conversations that the reps at Cordon Bleu gave her RIDICULOUS figures as to what kind of wages she could expect. My boss was paying her $12 an hour to start (which is very good for food biz wages in this rural area), and I was making exactly one more dollar than she was. I didn't tell her this though. She probably had the illusion that I was making $25 an hour or something.....ha ha.

She couldn't make meringue. Or chiffon cake. She didn't know how to be efficient or productive. Her ganaches were broken. Her eclairs collapsed. She overcooked the macaroons. Her cheesecakes cracked. She underbaked the creme brulees....consistently. She'd make a cup of tea, and sit there and sip on it while she watched her cream whip. Top of her class? Gimme a break!

Then after about a month or so she starts hinting to me that it was about time for her to get a raise. HUH????? That really set me off. I had just spent a month babysitting her, and helping her fix her mistakes and now she wants a RAISE? I finally told her that I made $13 an hour. You should have seen the look on her face. She went into some diatribe about how I was being taken advantage of and our bosses were the enemy and if we didn't get more money we should both just quit. I had to shake my head and laugh. She kept telling me that she had to pay off student loans and couldn't make it on $12 an hour. I told her that the LCB salespeople fed her a load of crap about wages in this business. I also said if she wanted bigger money, she'd have to move to a bigger city, because li'l ol' Port Hadlock isn't gonna pay her what she needs. Well, she finally quit (with no notice of course), and left me holding the ball. She wrote a nasty email to my boss about what a cheap ogre he was, and that he should be nicer to me. She apologized to me about leaving with no notice, but that must made me madder, and totally soured me on LCB grads. Of course, I know they're not all like that, but my view of them is tainted forever.

I guess the point of this post is that you can gain the skills you need without spending all that money. Really. The SMARTEST thing you can do if you want to change careers, is take a few courses, or a moderately priced program at a local community college or trade school. Then get your *** in the workforce, where you'll REALLY learn something, and TRULY find out if this is the career for you. Because places like Cordon Bleu don't give you the accurate experience of what being in a real working kitchen is REALLY like (that's probably why they make you do an externship).

Epilogue: I now have an assistant who rocks my world. She never went to culinary school, but she is fast, knows what she's doing, and can even do some things better and faster than I. She spent 22 years in the food biz, doing a lot of different things and it shows. She never spent one cent for her education; rather, she got paid to learn. She also possesses the brains, the energy, and the work ethic to bring it all together.

Ok, so maybe this wasn't so brief, but what I say really should be considered seriously. Honestly, $33,000 for a culinary education is a rip-off. :mad:
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thank you all for your answers and advice!

Chefpeon - Thank you so much for confirming something that I already suspected. Pastry arts and culinary in general, at the end of the day, is learned on the job.

I have a local community college which offers culinary classes towards a culinary degree. I can take those ONE at a time and see if it's right for me without committing to $33K.

I guess I just don't understand an industry that charges so much compared to the expected hourly income. That always seems to be a sign that something is a rip-off. ITT and DEVRY both charge insane amounts and the graduates are lucky to get $10-$12/hour. How do they do it? I guess good sales "reps"...
~TableBread
I can almost always be found in the kitchen, everything else can be found here: http://tablebread.blogspot.com
Reply
~TableBread
I can almost always be found in the kitchen, everything else can be found here: http://tablebread.blogspot.com
Reply
post #10 of 10
have you looked into free money from NRA I have heard the national rest assoc. is a good source of funding ? i do not know there guied lines but is is worth checking out ,it sounds like you really would like to go to school and should. it really sez a lot ,it will show the chef you went to school and are really commited to the TRADE not just a fly by .who would you hire ,
and of course you will really pick up alot of good conections in school .
the hotel I was at in 87 paved the way for me to work in Germany ,
it was not a overnight rags to riches ,witch i think many pepole seem to believe .
Tommy
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