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In Defense of Food

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Some of you may know that I appreciate Michael Pollan's writing. At one point I posted a site that contains all the articles he's written for the NY Times and other publications. Recently Pollan's new book, In Defense of Food, has been reviewed and here is the link to the review and an excerpt from the book.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/03/books/03masl.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/03/bo...html?ref=books


shel
post #2 of 8
Hi Shel - guess what! Michael Polin is being interviewed on a local PBS television station right now where I live - I'm watching it!
post #3 of 8
Just spent the day at Washington University in a colloquium with Joan Dye Gussow, Sid Mintz, a food philosopher from MN and a food historian from DC....
it was great. Some academias are so friggin' wishy washy, no cut and dry....when a student asked what she could do as one person to change her world the responses were telling...

The ethical lunch from Bon Appetit was interesting.....local heirloom tomatoes with pesto/arugula (tomatoes were from CA)
local tarragon roasted chicken (tarragon was local, chicken was antibiotic/hormone free from Tyson)
barley with zucchini and yellow squash (squashes were local)
peach and chevre tart....peaches were from CA, cheese was not local as stated on the menu....they'd run out the night before.
Fodder to talk about.

Joan expressed a fear that "local food" consumption is a fad. I don't believe it is.....that's an email that's swirling around my brain. It makes me wanna start teaching again, how many kids are disconnected from their food source/how many don't know simple cooking techniques/how many don't have a decent food palate or know the difference between basic varieties.....

Michael Pollan is coming to STL the end of NOV....it'll be interesting to see him in person.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
Nor do I. While I'll be the first to admit that the San Francisco Bay Area is a special place when it comes to food, nonetheless the farmers' markets are getting more crowded by the week, and the number of markets is growing. A few years ago it was pretty much just Berkeley and the Gourmet Ghetto that was the focal point of good eating, local foods, and organics. Now there are FIFTY TWO farmers' markets in the East Bay alone - that doesn't include San Francisco, Marin County, Napa and Sonoma Counties, and the south bay counties. Ferry Plaza is known world-wide. People I know who eschewed organic foods and locally produced food, are now insisting on being able to purchase and eat the local products. And the trend is the same in many other parts of the country. You know it as well as anyone, 'shroom.

And it's not just in the US ...

Spreading the word and changing people's minds are Alice Waters, Michael Pollan, Paula Wolfert (to a lesser degree, but she's out there), Paul Bertolli (he's got some killer new products). Just look at the number of chefs and restaurants that have menus that focus on local and organic foods - they are all over the country. CNN Traveller FRESH APPROACHES The word is getting out. Some of the above people are very good at commanding media attention, and they are popping up everywhere.
post #5 of 8
I live in a rural area more than 40 miles from the city where my daughter lives. Early this summer she and her husband brought their three boys to visit for a weekend. The oldest is 3 1/2. My husband took him out to pick the strawberries that were ripe in our patch. He now has the idea that all strawberries come from Grandpa's berry patch, even those that his mother buys at the grocery store. He does not want anyone to tell him otherwise. :)
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 
Alice Waters had an idea, and it is working:
The Edible Schoolyard

When she presented the concept in Chicago, she was roundly criticized by a number of people. They said it would never work in Chicago because the weather wasn't good enough, as it is in the SF area. She suggested building greenhouses, and again she was criticized. Yet Mayor Richard Daley agreed to go ahead with the idea and provided funding for six Edible Schoolyards.

Alice in the Heartland - How do her ideas play outside California?
post #7 of 8
She was spot on with her edible schoolyard, and kudos to the mayor who realized the value of her idea.

Studies have proven that kids are more likely to eat foods that they are personally involved with prior to it being placed on their plates. I am farm-raised, and grew up eating the vegetables the I helped cultivate, pick, and prepare. Beets, carrots, beans of all variety, peas, yams, potatoes. The only vegetable Mom never could get me to like was cucumbers, (and I still am not a fan of them).

I observed this same concept played out with my own children, and now I'm seeing it again with my grandchildren. While DD does not have a garden, she involves the boys in shopping and preparing the foods they eat. They have hearty appetites, and enjoy a wide range of foods.
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
The kids at MLK school feel very strongly about their garden and the good food that they eat. Many of them have changed the eating habits of their parents.
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