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spraying Chocolate

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Good Day
I have been given the chance to order a sprayer for Chocolate .
I have looked around and have found some paint sprayers ,
now do i want airless or what is the best way to go ,???
what experience have you had with these fun looking toy's .

Thank you .
Tommy
post #2 of 17
Hi, I've only used a Wagner paint sprayer and it worked well to spray chocolate
Food may bring us together, but a CAKE makes it a PARTY!!
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Food may bring us together, but a CAKE makes it a PARTY!!
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post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
HI ,
Dose it come with a plastic holding vessel.and a compressor ? or plug and go like I see on tv to spray a fence .

Thanks Tommy
post #4 of 17
The one I bought comes with two plastic containers and it plugs into the wall. There's no way to adjust air pressure, but you can change the spray pattern via a dial.
When I spray with chocolate, I thin it down with a lot of cocoa butter, 1:1.

Cheers.....Annie
post #5 of 17
Another vote for the wagner for general purpose chocolate spraying. I don't always use as much cocoa butter as chefpeon but she's a professional pastry chef and I'm not so take what I say for what it's worth. I started at 1:1 and cut that back gradually all the way down to as low as 30% with some chocolates and it didn't mess up the results other than it doesn't seem to melt as easily to the touch as the 1:1 did. It may depend on what you're trying to do as well. I'm usually just putting a chocolate shell (smooth or velvety) on a dessert item. More cocoa butter does seem to create a more delicate shell so I usually stay in the .5-1:1 range for covering mousses.
It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.
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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.
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post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
OK , now it starting to make sence ,Chefpeon likes it on the thinner side , now what are you spraying ? a cake that has been finished and you want that ''velvet look ''.
post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
OPPs
Then Tri2cook is making more shelf stable things? Iam guessing a heaver coat of chocolate . would you be using coating chocolate ,coveture .or a thin ready to use Pate glazuer ???
if i could get an idea, in what facet your both using the sprayer that would help .
I will be spraying cakes and some simple show peices .I have about 4-5 weeks to get this machine in and learn how to use it .how do you recover the overspray ?

thank you
All the info is greatly welcome .
Tommy
post #8 of 17
The only reason I used 1:1 cocoa butter to chocolate is because I wanted it to be thin enough to flow through the sprayer. If I can get away with more chocolate to cocoa butter, I will certainly try it.

I use my sprayer to spray frozen cakes for the velvet look....I also use it on chocolate pieces if I desire a velvety texture on those too.

I've never bothered recovering overspray.......way too much of a hassle.
post #9 of 17
I used a wagner to spray my nightmare before Christmas wedding cake in the cake gallery, it turned out nice, don't get the cheap one. Turning down the dial reduces the volume of chocolate sprayed. It does not affect air pressure. It is a PITA to clean thogoughly, usually I spray soapy water through it intil it sprays clear. I do this after rinsing everything. Be sure to lube the piston with some mineral oil when you are done as the piston assembly will corrode without any protection.
Fluctuat nec mergitur
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Fluctuat nec mergitur
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post #10 of 17
I don't do things that need to be shelf stable beyond a day or two. What I meant was, for some things a thicker shell that can handle a little more abuse is nice, for other things a delicate shell that shatters at a touch is nice. You can vary that to an extent with the percentage of cocoa butter and can go into even softer textures if you're willing to thin the chocolate with oil (I prefer not to). I don't recover overspray, there's not really all that much. I was going to post a picture of my most recent use of the sprayer that I have a picture of to give you an idea of the type of things I use it for but I keep getting a message that I can't link anything until I have 5 or more posts. Since I do have 5 or more posts I don't know what to do about that but the pic is in my photo gallery. It's called chocolate cherry cake.
It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.
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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.
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post #11 of 17

Wagner Here.

USING A WAGNER HERE. USE IT FOR A LOT A CHOCOLATE THINGS.sorry about the pictures .
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
yea Buddy
thats what Iam talking about .
when I say shelf shelf stable 2 day max , I have some good ideas to work on . in the nex few weeks . the first 4 weeks are basic and Classical cakes so once the students get that far i will introbuce the sprayer and really have some fun . Thank you so much for the feed back it is a great help . That is a verry thin coat .it looks nice .
Tommy
post #13 of 17
great thread everyone!

LOL, yeah, don't you just love those power tools.:bounce:

I had been using a separate air compressor type setup from way back and I have 3 separate "paint" units, but with y'all so happy with your Wagner, I'm thinking of getting one now. Does the Wagner allow you to adjust the air pressure, or is it the one Annie's talking about where you always have the same air pressure but can only adjust the nozzle?

BTW on the ratio, I think 1:1 is a good place to start, then depending on your setup, you can shift to more choc less cocoa butter from there, depending on what your sprayer will withstand effectively.

OK, another question on the topic, I also like to use them for spraying egg wash or other similar "gloss" onto bread instead of brushing it on. Has anyone found one that's effective for spraying oil in a fine mist? Do you think the Wagner would do it?

Nice pics Raz!
post #14 of 17
WOW THAT'S AMAZING!!!! :bounce::bounce: SO COOL!!!
~TableBread
I can almost always be found in the kitchen, everything else can be found here: http://tablebread.blogspot.com
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~TableBread
I can almost always be found in the kitchen, everything else can be found here: http://tablebread.blogspot.com
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post #15 of 17
My bread guys use their own Wagner to spray all the bread pans with organic canola oil every night.....works great. When they found out they would'nt have to brush each pan individually and could just take them outside and go crazy with power tool, they were very happy campers.......:lol:
post #16 of 17
yeah, no kidding!:bounce: Thanks Annie. I know most of the sprayers will do it, but I've had some issues with the oil going into some large drops/sputters in between the fine mist, so it seemed to be harder to get a uniformly fine mist. Sounds like the Wagner's working, Annie is it too much to ask you to check with them that the oil's coming out all fine mist with no blobs? :blush:
post #17 of 17
Sure, I'll ask 'em.....they probably don't care if they have blobs, but I'll ask em.....hopefully they are paying attention......
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