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Irish Food?

post #1 of 129
Thread Starter 
Anyone have any good Irish recipes?
post #2 of 129
take some meat and potatos and boil them, lol Sorry as a 1/2 Irish Im allowed too
post #3 of 129
Portergaff :) Take a bottle of guiness stout, mix 1/2 guiness to 1/2 lemonade (e.g.7-up). Drink :beer:

Ok its more an Aussie/Irish than pure Irish...but it really mellows the taste of the stout. Best on a really hot day.

Plenty of sites on the web if you google "Irish Recipes". I had a quick look and found this one, pretty traditional recipes:

Irish Recipes and Baking

Slainte!
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #4 of 129
This is funny. I was going to post the same reply. And I'm also half Irish!
post #5 of 129
You could always try Crubeens. Irish finger food :- Take a hind pigs trotter 1 each(more meat on the back legs) Stick it in a pot, cover with cold water. Add an onion a carrot, seasoning Thyme and a bay leaf and boil thebejeezuz out of it for 3 hours. Then you have the joy of sucking the bones clean. As a kid I loved it, you eat every thing, but its been a while. I'd give it a go tho
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #6 of 129
Bushmills black plus a shot glass
post #7 of 129
I get a bottle of Paddy's every year for my birthday. Blended, But the biz
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #8 of 129
The first few that come to mind...
  • Irish Stew
  • Colcannon or Champ (my personal faves)
  • Soda Bread or Farl
  • Boxty
  • Guiness
  • Whiskey
  • Boiled Bacon and Cabbage
  • Black Pudding
And don't forget some truly amazing Irish cheeses!!!

I know I'll think of some others, but you get the picture.
Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.
-M.F.K. Fisher
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Sharing food with another human being is an intimate act that should not be indulged in lightly.
-M.F.K. Fisher
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post #9 of 129
good start: rouxtheday. alot of the traditional Irish food these days revolve around Guinness. Over the last few years it seems that every pub has Traditional Guinness Irish Stew. Guinness type dishes were never part of any traditional Irish disk. To be honest it's something concocted for tourists and fake Irish Bars!

here's a quick recipe for a good ole fashioned Dublin meal :

Dublin Coddle:
1lb of bacon pieces
1lb of sausages
1 large onion
4 large carrots
1 tblsp of barley soup mix
6 large potatoes
3 tsp of corn flour
3 black pepper corns
1 bouquet garni (parsley, thyme, bay leaf, basil, sometimes rosemary)
1 litre of pre boiled water.
1 knob of butter


Cook off the bacon in the butter and then add in the chopped onion ( if you wish or leave and put in whole when the water is added ) when it is sauteed
add in the water. Add the rest of the ingrediants except for the corn flower and how to simmer for an hour. Then add the cornflower to thick over the next 1/2 hour eat then or leave for as long as you wish.

Delish man!
post #10 of 129
I got 2 recipes for you:

Irish Lamb Stew
www.bethecook.com/recipes/Irish-Lamb-Stew

Irish Corned Beef with Vegetables
www.bethecook.com/recipes/Irish-Corned-Beef-with-Vegetables

cb.jpg

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • salt and fresh ground black pepper to taste
  • 3 lbs lamb shoulder
  • 1 onion - chopped
  • 2 rib celery - chopped
  • 2 carrots - chopped
  • 2 tbsp flour
  • 1 tbsp butter
  • 1/2 tsp dried rosemary
  • 3 cups chicken stock
  • water as needed
  • 1 1/2 lbs potatoes
  • 1/4 cup chopped green onions

Instructions

 

Step 1

Season both sides of the lamb shoulder with salt and fresh ground black pepper.
Add some oil in a pan over high heat. Brown both sides of the lamb shoulders.
Transfer the lamb shoulders to a stock pot. Add the chopped rib celery and chopped carrots into the pot.

 

Step 2

Add the chopped onion into the pan, reduce the heat to medium. Cook for 5 minutes.
Add 1 tbsp butter and 2 tbsp flour, and cook for 1 minute.

 

Step 3

Add 3 cups chicken stock (or sub 1 bottle dark beer plus 1 1/2 cups stock), and 1/2 tsp dried rosemary.
Stir well. When it comes to a boil, Pour the whole mixture to the pot with the lambs.
Add more water if needed.
Simmer on low heat for 1 1/2 hours.

 

Step 4

After 1 1/2 hours, pull the lambs out, add 1 1/2 lbs potatoes. Return the lambs on the top of pot. Simmer for another 40 minutes or until tender. Then Remove only the lambs. Turn the heat high, bring it to a boil. Take off the fat on the top. Reduce for 10-12 minutes.
Return the lambs to the pot, add 1/4 cup chopped green onions, salt and pepper to taste.
post #11 of 129
I always think of corned beef and cabbage when I think of anything Irish.And of course Irish Soda Bread is go good.I found a really good recipe for this bread on www.havefunbaking.com and check out www.lovetobakeandcook.blogspot.com. A lot of the recipes now for Soda Bread have been changed,once they hit the Americas, they are still good but not necessarily traditionally Irish.
post #12 of 129
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #13 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by bughut View Post

You could always try Crubeens. Irish finger food :- Take a hind pigs trotter 1 each(more meat on the back legs) Stick it in a pot, cover with cold water. Add an onion a carrot, seasoning Thyme and a bay leaf and boil thebejeezuz out of it for 3 hours. Then you have the joy of sucking the bones clean. As a kid I loved it, you eat every thing, but its been a while. I'd give it a go tho
 

I live in the very deep south near the Okeefenokee and today it's boiled pig's feet.  Boiled in white wine, white vinegar, leeks, carrots, celery, onion poked with cloves, bouquet garni and water - for 6 hours.  Along with an onion sauce flavored with juniper berries, there'll be on the side some mashed potatos and Hoppin' John.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #14 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovetobake45 View Post

I always think of corned beef and cabbage when I think of anything Irish.And of course Irish Soda Bread is go good.I found a really good recipe for this bread on www.havefunbaking.com and check out www.lovetobakeandcook.blogspot.com. A lot of the recipes now for Soda Bread have been changed,once they hit the Americas, they are still good but not necessarily traditionally Irish.

King Arthur Flour sells some whole wheat flour that's both soft and low in protein that makes a really kick *ss loaf of soda bread.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #15 of 129
Come on, it's not possible there aren't more Irish dishes.  Isn;t lamb a big thing in Ireland?  Fish?  A lot of Ireland is on the sea!  Come on, guys, now i'm curious. 
And potato recipes - there have GOT to be lots of those, i can't believe everyone just boils them, right?  
Is there anyone from Ireland (rather than tenth generation american) on the forums?  Or anyone who's recently been there? I refuse to believe there isn't an interesting cuisine there.

And what are the characteristics of the cooking?  Is grilling big?  boiling?  Is beer used in cooking?  (I remember years ago translating a travel article about ireland and there were dishes like oysters cooked with beer - it was a long time ago, but i do remember there were more things than corned beef and cabbage and my mouth was watering. 

OUT WITH THE RECIPES!
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #16 of 129
I don't think Ireland is really known to be a Culinary Mecca. I'm half Irish, and didn't grow up with anything Irish,except Corned beef and cabbage. I would say a good corned beef on rye, and a 12 pack of Guinness, will do fine, and that's no Blarney................Chef Bill
post #17 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefBillyB View Post

I don't think Ireland is really known to be a Culinary Mecca. I'm half Irish, and didn't grow up with anything Irish,except Corned beef and cabbage. I would say a good corned beef on rye, and a 12 pack of Guinness, will do fine, and that's no Blarney................Chef Bill

Yeah, chef BillyB but I'm imagining you grew up in North America, not in Ireland.  But the wave of Irish immigration was well over a century ago, and the Irish immigrants were assimilated into American culture long before other groups, so the original cuisine was probably not maintained.  
I don;t believe the stereotypes of countries with "bad cuisine" - there must be dishes that are traditional and tasty, at least among those groups who were well off enough to be able to have a choice of food.  It's true that the Irish were forced to limit their crops to potatoes because they were colonized, and that makes the food source artificially limited, at least among the poor.  But I've met people who travelled in Ireland and said they ate really well.   Lamb stews, for sure, but what else?  fish pies?  fried stuff?  I'm curious. 
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #18 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post




Yeah, chef BillyB but I'm imagining you grew up in North America, not in Ireland.  But the wave of Irish immigration was well over a century ago, and the Irish immigrants were assimilated into American culture long before other groups, so the original cuisine was probably not maintained.  
I don;t believe the stereotypes of countries with "bad cuisine" - there must be dishes that are traditional and tasty, at least among those groups who were well off enough to be able to have a choice of food.  ...
 

Maybe checkout the Time/Life Book on Irish Cuisine.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #19 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post




Yeah, chef BillyB but I'm imagining you grew up in North America, not in Ireland. 

Yes, corned beef is an American Irish thing, not something usually found in Ireland.  They boiled pork belly, not beef.  But the immigrants in New York had trouble, for some unknown reason, finding pork belly in the Jewish markets.  So they used the closest approximation, beef brisket.

At least that's the way I heard how corned beef came to be associated with the Irish.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #20 of 129

How about desserts?  All thoughts seem to be focusing on savoury pretty much.  Ideas?  Would be really interested to know from someone who lives/has lived there.

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #21 of 129
 You might look at these three cookbooks at Amazon.com: 

1. Celtic Folklore and Cooking

2. The New Irish Table:  This book in particular has a number of recipes for crumble, cakes, custards, puddings and tarts.

3. Feasting Galore Irish Style
Edited by amazingrace - 3/5/10 at 6:09pm
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post #22 of 129

Or you can take a look at those and other Irish cooking books right here at Cheftalk: http://www.cheftalk.com/products/category/regional-international

One of the nice things about our new platform is that you can find information about virtually any cookbook without wandering away. Just click on the reviews button, then on the appropriate category, and read away.

Should you decide that you want to buy a book you're reading about, you can then link directly from our page to Amazon and make your purchase.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #23 of 129
It would be interesting though, to hear some recipes of things people really like.  I doubt I'll buy a cookbook without having an idea about the kind of cooking it is, which is what makes a forum so interesting to me.   
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #24 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

It would be interesting though, to hear some recipes of things people really like.  I doubt I'll buy a cookbook without having an idea about the kind of cooking it is, which is what makes a forum so interesting to me.   
 

Ditto for me, Siduri.

I like to find out what the real Irish is and what has been tried and tasted and enjoyed.  Seems to be mostly lamb and potato so far.

Surely somone has to have had a uniquely/clasical (I prefer that to "authentic") dish in front of them and has chowed down into it.  An Irish Mist Fool? ( is there such a thing I have no idea...BTW it's the most delicious liquer, need just a tbsp and you are *in the mist)

So - not to stress about it but gently & generally enquiring - an Irish desert that someone has tried (apart from Irish coffee )  Now that is nice, but to me it follows dessert, surely?

What has somebody tried that they believe to be an Irish dessert?  Just curious is all.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #25 of 129
http://www.irelandseye.com/aarticles/culture/recipes/index.shtm

This site boasts of traditional Irish recipes.  I stumbled on it while wandering the 'net in search of specials ideas for St. Paddy's Day.  Some of the desserts include curd cakes, fruit fools & crumbles.  I'm afraid I haven't tried any yet (not sure where to find Gooseberries this time of year)

A rhubarb crumble, I have had.  It was quite tart and tasty (I often like tart better than sweet)  I didn't know it to be an Irish dish but apparently it is so...
post #26 of 129
Charron - that does sound good, especially with some custard on top.  I didn't realize that was Irish either.  Thanks
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #27 of 129
i made Colcannon yesterday - mash potato, cabbage, and scallions, with some butter, milk, cream, and seasoning.


Irish Stew is the only other irish dish i know off the top of my head.
we're as good as our last meal.
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we're as good as our last meal.
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post #28 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

Come on, it's not possible there aren't more Irish dishes.  Isn;t lamb a big thing in Ireland?  Fish?  A lot of Ireland is on the sea!  Come on, guys, now i'm curious. 
And potato recipes - there have GOT to be lots of those, i can't believe everyone just boils them, right?  
Is there anyone from Ireland (rather than tenth generation american) on the forums?  Or anyone who's recently been there? I refuse to believe there isn't an interesting cuisine there.

And what are the characteristics of the cooking?  Is grilling big?  boiling?  Is beer used in cooking?  (I remember years ago translating a travel article about ireland and there were dishes like oysters cooked with beer - it was a long time ago, but i do remember there were more things than corned beef and cabbage and my mouth was watering. 

OUT WITH THE RECIPES!

 


Hi I am Irish and there is more to Irish cuisine.  Ireland was marketed as 'the food island' some years back - its meat, dairy and seafood enjoy a great reputation, perhaps more so in Europe than in America.  The quality is there, however  almost all of the Irish 'cuisine' and related recipes and techniques have been lost.  Anyone who knows something of  Ireland's history will understand this- I won't get into in here but for example most of the population died or emigrated due to the great famine.  Most of the smoke houses, the farmhouse cheeses, bakery recipes and techniques,  died or left  with the people.  The dishes that are well known today are what the poor would have scrapped together after the famine-soda bread is a great example of this. 

Personally, (although I am biased obviously) I think Irish food is great, cheeses, bakeries ect are making a come back.  But with a small population, widely spread over the island, it is hard to make a living from the artisan food section or even restaurant section outside Dublin or the other cities.  Despite this, restaurants produce great food-often a mix of Irish and European Cuisine.  

Guinness and Baileys have become part of modern Irish cusine.  Zest is an Irish cook book in aid of the Irish Hospice Fondation-it is a collection of recipes from some of irelands top recipes.  This should give an idea of the kind of food cooked in Ireland. 

Phew, what a long post!
post #29 of 129
Not all that long, cakeface, and welcome to the forums.  I know that most of the people here know only the cuisine the Irish immigrants brought to the states, but of course, they didn't have the cheese, smokehouse meats and baked dishes, probably because in those days, like in Italy then, people didn;t bake at home, few people had ovens, and the ingredients for baking were luxuries. 
But the artificial economy imposed on the Irish did a lot to destroy the food culture.  (Luckily not the poetry though!)

If I ever get enough money to travel, Ireland is on my list. 

Can you post a couple of your favorite recipes?
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #30 of 129
Boxty is one that (I think) has not been mentioned.  Potato based dish, you can Wiki or Google it.

Went looking for Irish Desserts, came up with this site:

http://www.recipegoldmine.com/saintpatdess/saintpatdess.html

Seems to be interesting.....
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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