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Irish Food? - Page 2

post #31 of 129
Wowzers, I cannon get enough of this! thank you so much!
post #32 of 129

Come on, it's not possible there aren't more Irish dishes.  Isn;t lamb a big thing in Ireland?  Fish?  A lot of Ireland is on the sea!  Come on, guys, now i'm curious. 

The story goes... That the irish did land a lot of fish. Herrings i think.But they didnt like it, or thought it nasty somehow...Anyhoo, the used it as fertiliser for the spuds.Well as we know there was a tattie famine and as they wouldnt eat the plentiful supply of fish, the rest is history. True.

There wasnt much beef around  back in the day. Mostly for the gentry.In fact there wasnt much meat around full stop.Except for the lucky few who .kept pigs.

Just as a btw, the irish cuisine along with our own Scots, contains a huge French influence.

 Seafood is superb in Ireland now. Crab, lobster and salmon are all used,  As is game.

  • Smoked salmon with potato cakes, served with sour cream,I can recommend.
  • Game broth
  • mussel soup with saffron and garlic
  • Veg stew with herb dumplings


 
Irish stew made with scraggy neck of lamb, floury potatoes, carrots and onions is always a winner. Cooked for 3 hours or more.  You can buy it in Scotland in tins???

Has anyone tried Dulce...Its a dried seaweed that's eaten like sweeties in Northern Ireland.My inlaws swear by it...Theyre from Belfast. In my opinion, it's just nasty!

 

"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #33 of 129
Hi, thanks for the welcome,
 Well one dish no-one mentioned is barm brack.  It is a very old tradition in Ireland and is traditionally eaten around Hallowe'en.  It is basically a like a brioche but with dried fruit soaked in tea added.  A ring is placed inside the cake and whoever gets the ring is king or queen for the day (a coin, stick, and pea can also be added with the following meanings: a coin:you will be rich, a stick:your husband or wife will beat you and a pea:you'll be poor)
 Here is my recipe: It is very large quantities so divide by 5 if you want to yield 2/3 barm bracks 

5kg T65 or strong flour
225g milk
175g fresh yeast-half this if using dried yeast
125g salt
600g sugar
3kg eggs
3kg butter
approx 2kg mixed peel and sultanas, soaked in black tea the night before and drained

make as like a  brioche-dont forget to add the ring! Make into large rounds about 450g each Glaze with honey when ready and return to oven briefly.
 

 
post #34 of 129
oh and another one not mentioned is a blaa- it is a Waterford bread.  I'll have a root around for the recipe for that and post it.
post #35 of 129

Waterford Blaa
 

1kg t65 or strong flour
20g salt
45g honey
50g yeast
600g milk
100g unsalted butter, soft


flour temperature + room temperature + milk temperature =  56 Celcius
e.g. if flour temp + room temp is 21 +23= 44 then milk temp should be 12 degrees celcius (56 -44=12)


mix all ingredients except butter for 5 minutes with dough hook on speed 2 or medium speed
add butter while mixing and continue to mix another 5 minutes

turn dough on to floured table,  dust with flour and cover with plastic sheet
leave 45minutes-1 hour.
cut dough into 90g pieces,
rest 15 minutes
shape into rounds, flatten slightly
arrange on tray, closer together than usual.  Dust with plenty of flour.
Allow to prove, lightly covered with plastic sheet.
cook at 170-180 for 25 minutes approx.  Don't cook with steam-you dont want them crusty
The blaas will be quite close together but you cut to separate and this will give the square shape, but you can place them further apart to get a rounder shape
allow to cool on wire racks

post #36 of 129
Here are some more irish dishes I'm not claiming them all Irish inventions-gingerbread and appletart for example are  old staples of many countries but there certainly were and are, Irish versions.  (being a pastry chef and baker-I came up with sweet only- apologies)-
  • gingerbread -Norman roots, the normans introduced spice in 12th century.
  • fraughan tart - tradition during Lunasa. Fraughans are bilberries-a type of wild blue berry
  • soda bread-a produce of famine times-the poor quality flour sent by Brits did not raise until the people discovered bicarbonate of soda did the trick
  • brown scones
  • buttermilk scones- Little Christmas of 6th January was known as Nollaig na mBan or womans christmas-the day was filled with all of the above delicacies women would enjoy
  • apple cake and tart- apples are bounty full in Ireland
  • brown bread
  • currant bread
  • tarts-rhubarb, gooseberry,  blackberry etc
  • jams-rhubarb, blackcurrant, blueberry, gooseberry etc
  • Barm brack- for Hallowe'En
  • blaas - Waterford traditon
  • yellaman-Northern Eire tradition
  • Hot cross buns- Easter Anglo norman, tudor roots
  • Simnel cake- Easter.  Norman roots 
  • christmas pudding and cake-prior to Anglo Norman invasion this was know as cutlin.
  • hasty pudding- made during mayday fesitval
  • bread and butter pudding -a pudding such as this was traditional during St Johns Eve
  • pancakes-For Shrove Tuesday
  • oatcakes-oat bread was very popular as oats grow well in the wet climate
  • carrageen pudding-made with carrageen moss
  • steamed pudding
  • porter cake-often made with stout/guinness

 


Dont forget the potato did not come to ireland until 1585, it was first a specimen plant in the gardens of the rich and then used to feed pigs and other farm animals but by 1675 the millions of suppressed poor in  Ireland found it an invaluable food supply, it took little space, not much effort to grow and could feed many.
There was a rich culinary tradition in Ireland before supression and the famine and there still is - it has taken on a more modern approach.  Irish food isn't all about potatoes, cabbage or bacon - it has gone beyond that-it is alive today and like all living cusines  its a mix of new and old and still evolving.  If anyone would like some recipes for any of the above let me know.

post #37 of 129
I didn't know much about Irish food. I knew there were a lot of potatoes involved (and I love potatoes).

There's also some pretty damn good fish and sausages.

Here in the USA I worked with some people from Ireland. A couple of them were pretty good friends, here for training at HP and then going back to Ireland soon. They got a Christmas package, which included black 'n white pudding, and Irish cold-smoked salmon. They thought it was just ok and they didn't care for salmon. I was saying how it was "pretty good" and they let me have most of it.

I ended up with a couple pounds of some of the best smoked salmon I ever had (cold smoked), and some of the best sausage ever. Woo hoo! Looking to make more Irish friends :^)
post #38 of 129
Lucky you!  Its true you can get great sausages, rashers and black and white pudding here- all the ingredients for a hearty breakfast.  
post #39 of 129
Irish and Scottish recipes are often very similar.

As has been said, Corned beef and cabbage is an americanism - but is now available in Ireland, simply because many of the American tourists who visit Ireland expect to see it on an Irish menu!

They make great cakes - and soda breads- and boxty, colcannon and other sides.  Irish stew, using good Irish lamb is a great dish.

Have a google, look up Irish chefs like Paul Rankin, Darina Allen (I've attended a number of courses at the Ballymaloe cookery school) and her daughter in law - Rachel Allen. All great Irish cooks. 
post #40 of 129
Got to disagree with you there, Rachel Allen is not a great cook-sure she was only a student in Ballymaloe herself and thats where she met Darina Allen's son.

She is easy on the eye and  offered a new way to remarket themselves after the whole child porn on the computer scandal, but a good cook, no way! Sure when she started out on her RTE  shows she was making things like sandwiches and putting shop bought icecream in a glass, sprinkling on a few nuts and a bit of sauce and calling it cooking! 
Edited by cakeface - 4/13/10 at 3:40pm
post #41 of 129
I don't know Rachel's background - but I've used a number of recipes from one of her books (a Christmas gift from a family member) and they have all worked quite well.  I don't know her RTE programmes - only her appearances on the UK's 'Market Kitchen'.

Darina Allen is/was a good cook.  Fairly plain Irish food, but using good, local ingredients.  Paul Rankin is another matter.  I've attended a couple of his courses at the Nairn cookery school in Stirlingshire.  Richard Corrigan is another great Irish chef.  I've eaten at a couple of his restaurants in London.
post #42 of 129
I agree with you on all the other chefs and there are alot of other great chefs too that would be  only recognised in Ireland.  I'm sure Rachel Allen does have good cook books-but I'd say she had very little, if any input into any recipes - she is just a face.

Read this http://www.forkncork.com/content/showthread.php?t=1300&highlight=rachel+allen for a funny insight into her early tv series in Ireland- I wasn't joking about the sandwich - in fact has her own range of sandwiches in O'Brien's sandwich bars!)

still- fair dues and all that
post #43 of 129
post #44 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeface View Post




Hi I am Irish and there is more to Irish cuisine.  Ireland was marketed as 'the food island' some years back - its meat, dairy and seafood enjoy a great reputation, perhaps more so in Europe than in America.  The quality is there, however  almost all of the Irish 'cuisine' and related recipes and techniques have been lost.  Anyone who knows something of  Ireland's history will understand this- I won't get into in here but for example most of the population died or emigrated due to the great famine.  Most of the smoke houses, the farmhouse cheeses, bakery recipes and techniques,  died or left  with the people.  The dishes that are well known today are what the poor would have scrapped together after the famine-soda bread is a great example of this. 


Personally, (although I am biased obviously) I think Irish food is great, cheeses, bakeries ect are making a come back.  But with a small population, widely spread over the island, it is hard to make a living from the artisan food section or even restaurant section outside Dublin or the other cities.  Despite this, restaurants produce great food-often a mix of Irish and European Cuisine.  


Guinness and Baileys have become part of modern Irish cusine.  Zest is an Irish cook book in aid of the Irish Hospice Fondation-it is a collection of recipes from some of irelands top recipes.  This should give an idea of the kind of food cooked in Ireland. 


Phew, what a long post!


It's great to know there are actual Irish cooks here! Although not Irish, my mothers entire family is Irish and I have been on a quest lately to learn all the Irish recipes and cuisine I can. In the hopes of one day opening an Irish restaurant here in the states somewhere. I think its a crime that Irish cuisine as you say has been lost. I have found very few cookbooks with anything remotely resembling traditional Irish food. I believe there is an organization there in Ireland that is trying to restore and research the culinary history of the island. It's my hope to get back over there within a year to spend some time in Tipperary or Donegal volunteering at some local butcher shops and bakeries in order to learn their ways and recipes. For instance I have been searching for a white pudding recipe for ages now and have come up with nothing usable. I am still searching for a good cookbook with traditional Irish food in it. A lot on the market today are not traditional Irish recipes. I have dreams of revitalizing Irish cuisine in my own small way. It's been horribly neglected by the culinary world I feel and I think thats a shame. While Italian, French, Indian, Asian, you name it has been studied to death Irish cuisine has been ignored. You can't even find an Irish restaurant anywhere in the states. "Pubs" here do not count smile.gif So it's good to see someone in the forums representing Ireland.
post #45 of 129

I was recently given a wonderful book by an Irish author, Darina Allen called Forgotten Skills.  Has anyone seen it? The whole book radiates wholesome food, wonderful surroundings, great ingredients.  She has a cooking school in the country, where she raises her own animals, grows her own food and does everything from smoking to salting to just plain cooking. 

Haven't made anything from it yet, but it's a beautiful book.  Nice just to leaf through it. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #46 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

I was recently given a wonderful book by an Irish author, Darina Allen called Forgotten Skills.  Has anyone seen it? The whole book radiates wholesome food, wonderful surroundings, great ingredients.  She has a cooking school in the country, where she raises her own animals, grows her own food and does everything from smoking to salting to just plain cooking. 
Haven't made anything from it yet, but it's a beautiful book.  Nice just to leaf through it. 

Yeah I have heard of the book, but after the first book of hers I bought titled "Irish Traditional Cooking" I won't buy anymore of her books. Seriously that cookbook is the most atrociously error riddled book ever. My biggest beef is her recipes. I dont think she has ever used a single one of those recipes in that book. The amounts given are so wildly wrong and off that nothing made from that book would ever turn out right. I would be appalled to put my name on something so full of errors. She obviously never proofed that book before publishing it. So I wont be buying her books again. However there is a good one called "Elegant Irish Cooking" by Noel C. Cullen. That has some great Irish fare in it. Albeit more modern Irish food but still rather good recipes. It's definitely worth having on your bookshelf if you are interested in Irish cuisine.
post #47 of 129

X86, that's interesting.  I'll have to try something from it to see.  Strange that she would have bad recipes, since she seems to have a school, and in a school you have to have recipes that turn out. 

 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #48 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by siduri View Post

X86, that's interesting.  I'll have to try something from it to see.  Strange that she would have bad recipes, since she seems to have a school, and in a school you have to have recipes that turn out. 

Agreed but this is not her schools cookbook. I dont even think she looked at the recipes in there. Look at the bread pudding recipe for instance.
post #49 of 129

I don't have that cookbook so i can't look at the recipe.  Could it be that she uses imperial measures and they're not the same as the american measures?  The british fluid ounce is smaller than the US one, and many other measures are different. 

"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #50 of 129

7 course Irish Banquet   a 6 pack of beer and a boiled potato.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #51 of 129

As I've said, I've attended a number of cookery courses at Ballymaloe (Darina Allen's school) - she is/was (she may have retired now, because it's been a few years since my last visit there) a great Irish cook, cooking with Irish ingredients in Ireland.  Can't get much more Irish than that!

 

The problem may be that, as suggested by Siduri, the recipes are written in either litres etc (metric) or in Imperial measures (pre decimalisation) - I know that years ago, when giving American friends some of my Scottish recipes, they claimed the results were unsuccessful - it turned out they were using US measurements (for example, an Imperial pt and a US pint are not the same).

post #52 of 129

There is an attempt to introduce a type of appellation controlee here in Ireland. And a few foods have been given PGS -Protected geographical statusTimoleague brown pudding, Clare Island salmon, Imokilly Regato cheese and Connemara hill lamb,  as has a type of potato and eel, I think the Waterford blaa and Clonakilty blackpudding are going for it too.  There are some great artisan producers here and I heard on the radio today that more artisans are opening business now partly because the recession has lead to a reduction in rents and other costs that were too prohibitive for small producers during the boom.There is a positve outlook for the farming and argicultural sector regarding exports too.  So all in all, things are looking up for Irish food I think!

 

 


Edited by cakeface - 2/12/12 at 6:30am
post #53 of 129

Good for them - ensuring that some foods have a protected status can only help to ensure that the product remains true to its roots.

I know that Scotland has tried to ensure that many of its 'native' and 'special' foods and drinks have some kind of protected status, too.

 

I've been amazed at the strides that have been made in Irish foods as served by pubs/small cafes in recent years.  So much of it used to be heavy, stodgy, badly prepared foods.  Nowadays, so many take a real pride in the produce and how it is cooked and served.

 

 

post #54 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakeface View Post

There is an attempt to introduce a type of appellation controlee here in Ireland. And a few foods have been given PGS -Protected geographical status
Timoleague brown pudding, Clare Island salmon, Imokilly Regato cheese and Connemara hill lamb,  
as has a type of potato and eel, I think the Waterford blaa and Clonakilty blackpudding are going for it too.  There are some great artisan producers here and I heard on the radio today that more artisans are opening business now partly because the recession has lead to a reduction in rents and other costs that were too prohibitive for small producers during the boom.There is a positve outlook for the farming and argicultural sector regarding exports too.  So all in all, things are looking up for Irish food I think!


That is GREAT news! I found a recipe for the blaa on Wikipedia of all places. Now if I could find a recipe for making the cheese and the brown pudding I might have some worthwhile additions to my Irish menu smile.gif
post #55 of 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by X86BSD View Post


That is GREAT news! I found a recipe for the blaa on Wikipedia of all places. Now if I could find a recipe for making the cheese and the brown pudding I might have some worthwhile additions to my Irish menu smile.gif

Ah yes, but don't forget the:

  • Vegetarian
  • Vegan
  • Raw food
  • Low Carb
  • Low Fat
  • No sodium
  • Gluten Free
  • and all the rest of the choices that potential customers have

options as well talker.gif laser.gifyou cannot afford to miss anyone, right?

 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #56 of 129
indeed. The Cafe paradiso-a restaurant in cork- cook books would cover you in vegan and vegetarian cooking. Other good books would be an irish butchers shop by pat whelan. Neven McGuire has some very popular cookbooks, other IRish chefs with books are
Richard Corrigan, Kevin Thornton,Conrad Gallagher, Derry Clarke, Georgina Campbell .

i5f you are heading to ireland to work, go to cork for the butchers-you'll get great black or white pudding recipes there. We're planning on opening a new bakery-if we get the location we want and the rent and rates are right we will-we're just waiting on confirmation.if it goes ahead you can call into us for the bread lessons!
post #57 of 129
and look at the cais website www.irishcheese.ie and the irish food board site www.bordbia.ie you'll get loads of recipes on there. your restaurant idea sounds great and I wish you all the sucess with it,good luck
post #58 of 129

I've eaten at Richard Corrigan's restaurant a few times and have to say, IMO, he is THE best Irish chef I've ever come across.  Mind you, I still like Paul Rankin, too!

post #59 of 129

At the risk of stirring up trouble (something I seem to have no problems doing here) being full Irish I can tell you there is no real Irish-centric cuisine.  Now, If you want to count the fact that the 'gaels' pretty much owned all of spain, France, etc, etc, then I guess we do have something of a culinary history.  Most of what you see as 'Irish' cuisine today is really adaptations of what you see in the United States.  

 

Of course there are the regulars like Boxty, Colcannon, champ, etc, etc, however most of historic Irish cuisine was nasty, nasty stuff.  In my own research I turned up the fact that most of Irish cuisine was whatever could be hauled out of the sea and boiled to hell.  Most vegetables in Ireland were introduced there including the potato.  In addition birds were sometimes caught and they were slathered with clay and then baked whole in a fire, guts, feathers and all.  On the upside, once the bird was done, all you had to do was crack the 'clay pot' and the feathers came off with the clay.  Nicely done!

 

500 years of British assault and tyranny really ripped the heart and soul out of the Irish culture.  There was a very rich and vibrant beginnings of culture through their music and language, and were beginning to develop more organization as such when the Irish were subjected to slavery and abuse from other cultures, IE. beginning with the spanish invasions and then of course British colonization which I will avoid for political reasons.

 

Once Great Britain had cut-down all Irelands trees, (thank you Cromwell the Butcher) burned all of Irelands beautiful harps and burned all of the music for harps, and cut the hands off all known harpists in the land they had effectively begun to change and destroy her culture forever.  To this day none of Irelands original musical subculture has been re-gained.

 

All that being said, once you destroy a people-groups culture nothing much else can really emerge.  The Irish were scatterd to the four-corners of the globe, and generally followed the Brits as they tried to colonize (read subjegate) other cultures.  As slaves they populated the Barbados and other sugar-rich colonies, (hence why you still see black people with stark red hair and freckles there at times) Africa, and India.  Where-ever the British tended to go, not long after they would bring the Irish to be the 'sub-culture' in the area filling the roles such as nurses, butchers, housemaids, bakers, and other support functions.

 

my two cents worth.

 

post #60 of 129

WOW.

Just....

 

 

WOW.

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