or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › poison dumplings from China
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

poison dumplings from China

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Just read that 175 Japanese were poisoned by pesticide riddled chinese made goyza.
Really scary. We buy chinese made dumplings here.....just wonder whether we're getting some extra ingredients along with the edible food.
Between toys having lead and food having pesticide, I'm wondering who's paying attention to imports.
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #2 of 15
I've stopped buying stuff made in China. Not even hot bean paste.
post #3 of 15
Any brand names mentioned in the article? Do you have a link to the article?

I stopped buying any food products with a made in China origin a long time ago. I urge everyone to read the package labels carefully. You'd be surprised at how much cr@p is produced in China and sold here in the US - many well known, organic brands of frozen vegetables, for example, canned beans and soups ... even my Chinese friends don't buy foods made or produced in China. Trader Joe's is a big seller of frozen Chinese vegetables, and the last time I checked Whole Foods was also selling similar products.

shel
post #4 of 15
Me too, I buy and eat absolutely NOTHING from China, nor would I serve anything in a professional capacity. It was a little hard to give up some of the wonderful condiments and produce I used to buy at Chinese markets, but there are some American companies that make them here, and small farmers are growing more of the Chinese veggies. Lots of farmed shrimp is from China, and when you look at the stats of the small percentage of products they actually test and how many are rejected as toxic, it makes you realize that it's prudent to eat none of it.

You mentioned dumplings, did you see the footage caught of people cutting up cardboard boxes and putting them into the dumpling contents.

It is very sad to me to see more and more produce coming from China. Chinese apples are in the store more and more, guess we don't grow any here so we need to bring them in from a country that still uses DDT.

It is an eye opener to see how toxic their environment has become and how poisonous their food is. They really blew it if you ask me, because they have a lot of beautiful countryside and so many farmers who could be contributing to the nation's economy, but they have blown any international faith that their food is safe. They have shown a total disrespect to their farmers in how they have grabbed their land without proper compensation to fuel their "development". Who would think of adding something as toxic as melamine to get protein content to read higher, sheesh. And that ended up getting fed to farmed fish in BC in Canada, and I also read poultry in the U.S., but hey, government says it's safe. :beer:

I shudder when I see more "organics" coming from China. Eek. Trader Joe's had Chinese "organic" sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds, and some other stuff I noticed in their nuts and dried fruit section. It is interesting how less prominently labelled it is than the products from other countries of origin. I'm guessing that the Walmart "organic" stuff will eventually include a lot of stuff from China.

Then there's the products that say "Product of USA" that can be made with ingredients from China. Such as apple juice. It's canned in the US, so most of the "value" is in the US so my understanding is that it qualifies as Product of USA even if 100% of the apple juice is from concentrate from China. It's an eye opener to see how many packaged convenience foods contain some China in them too.
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #6 of 15
That was a scam. The reporter is now in jail.
post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 
Kuan, is the pesticide thing real?
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #8 of 15
sure, Chinese authorities put the reporter in a Chinese jail. They also executed an official over the melamine scandal. :rolleyes:
post #9 of 15
I saw an article in the paper this morning. I don't think it's a scam, Kuan. :eek:
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #10 of 15
I believe Kuan mentioned the cardboard in buns thing, which was PROBABLY a scam, but I guess when we no longer believe anything their media pulls out then we can say whatever we want about the state of their country and no one's free to dispute that.

However, I think before we look at the state of foods overseas we should look to the safety of our local food supply. Remember the spinach scare of last year in California? E-coli and salmonella due to contamination of the water source? How about in Italy where Extra Virgin olive oil was illegally diluted with various other oils and products? I was in China two years ago and although it is most certainly true that our standard of living is a great deal higher than 90% of Chinese in China one shouldn't paint with a wide brush that everything from China is substandard or that they're willing to swindle everybody that passes by. There are still many excellent artisinal products that are on par with anything from France, Italy, or Japan and food is certainly an important part of the culture. Considering that the British were sending forcibly sending opium into their country nearly two hundred years ago to poison the people and relieve their massive trade deficit and the pretty overt use of gunboat diplomacy to get their way... it's payback time, no?
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
post #11 of 15
Boy, there's nothing that improves a cooking website like randomly chosen and unsubstantiated historical "facts" that imply random violence between unknown people is a good idea.:eek:
post #12 of 15
All I'm saying is that general xenophobia and ethnocentrism is never a good way of managing affairs about food and life in general. Then you're just falling back on stereotypes and hurting both yourself and others.

Any continuing discussion about historical notes not related to food you can send via PM.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
post #13 of 15
It is very comforting to know that we live in a country (U.S.) where food poisoning or contaminated products could NEVER EVER happen.
post #14 of 15
LOL :lol:

I like Chinese food, should I stop eating it so I live longer?

Who can live life so paranoid? What's the big deal about some chemicals?

I also wonder maybe Chinese regulations aren't as stringent because they're so overpopulated, sickness and death might help ease that tension.
post #15 of 15
The business of doing business in China is different than it is here. Here, in the US, we are more or less a nation of laws, and contracts. ;) It is in China too, but over in China the law can be overridden by seniority, as is often the case. Corruption is also rampant in China. US corporations who want to do business in China have to find creative ways to get the job done. This includes ways to account for money and other items not normally included in the contract. Such is the system in China. Open to interpretation and corruption.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › poison dumplings from China