or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

CIA vs. FCI

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I am currently looking at the CIA and FCI. I am trying to weigh wether or not I will learn as much at FCI for 6 mo. or CIA for 21 mo. Also i will be graduating from the rosen school of hospitality at the University of Central florida with a restaurant and foodservice management degree.

Any input would be appreciated.

kyle
post #2 of 18
Do you have the requisite industry experience to get into the CIA? You are young, so I would suggest that you go for a degree and not a diploma. The CIA (and many places that don't cost nearly as much) can let you earn a degree. A number of places require a degree for employment for assistant's positions. A combination of education and experience is always better than one or the other.
post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 

CIA vs. FCI

I have 2 years experience working in family italian place and now in a fine dinging sea food. so I do meet the requirement for CIA.
post #4 of 18
You should meet the requirment, i think you only need 6 months for cia.
post #5 of 18
UHHHH unfortunately they have gotten rid of the requirements of hours in a professional kitchen which i think is bull **** and they have gotten rid of the essay to applying which is also crap.

Now all you do is apply and if you have good grades or something that makes you stand out your in. Its dumb because we are going to get so many people that have never held a french knife in their lives and wont know what they are doing, its going to be stupid because the drop out rate is going to go up and the failure rate is also going to climb, which means our reputation will be ****. ALL BECAUSE OF THE CRAVE FOR MONEY. BULL****!
"Some of us Cook. Some of us Grow. All of us Eat."
Reply
"Some of us Cook. Some of us Grow. All of us Eat."
Reply
post #6 of 18
Even with the former reuqirment there were still people from cia that arent that great. its all culinary schools that are after money not just cia. just hope they keep some standards and dont turn into le cordon blue schools.
post #7 of 18
I am new to this forum, and joined because my stepdaughter who is 21 has her heart set on the CIA in NY. She has been down in San Luis Obispo attending juinor college for the past 4 years. Poor grades, 2 DUI's, works part time at Tahoe Joes, a chain restaurant in the kitchen doing prep. I don't think she stands a chance getting in and have told her Dad she would be better off attending a Juinor College in Santa Rosa Calif that has a great culinary program at this time. She doesn't have a dime and her father pays for rent and school right now. She says she will just take out student loans? Will her father have to co-sign? And then when she defaults, will he be responsible? She has never paid a bill in her life.
bandit
Reply
bandit
Reply
post #8 of 18

reply

Lots of people think the Cia is overrated
post #9 of 18
Most likely she won't just take out student loans to go to any culinary school. Just like any college education in any field it is not cheap. Any loans will almost definitely require a co-signer. The co-signer is indeed responsible for paying the debt if the primary signatory doesn't pay.

Its possible cooking is what she wants to do but I would be trying to discern her passion for the work and the product i.e food. My daughter who graduated from CIA about a year ago is quite passionate about food and its preparation. She is passionate about the cuisines of different cultures around the world. While she doesn't care one whip stitch for cooking shows on TV she is almost always reading about food and wine if she is not cooking. Most of her conversation revolves around food preparation and you can hear the passion in her voice when she is talking about it. She looked at three or four different programs and decided CIA was the one she wanted to go with. Does this description sound like your step daughter? Has she looked into other programs? If so, why is she set on CIA? What does she expect to get out of CIA? Does she think graduating from CIA will make her a chef? If so, she may be surprised to find out that what CIA produces is cooks. With experience and work, cooks can become chefs if that is what they want. What are her expectations and what goals does she have? Another option she should look into is an apprenticeship program under the auspices of the American Culinary Federation. There is a chapter in California.
post #10 of 18

CIA ad infinitum

I have worked with numerous graduates (and flunk-outs) from CIA, some of them talented, some of them narrow minded shoemakers. But on one thing they all agreed--"CIA" stands for "Chicken In Abundance." There is another meaning frequently mentioned, but not appropriate for this venue.
post #11 of 18
not true. I just graduated from CIA and they have not taken away the 6 month working expreience requirement or the essay. unfortunately, it is a constant struggle between the school's reputation and crave for money, but all in all I would still say it holds high standards and is reputable.
post #12 of 18

A possible answer

Have her go to the local community college, especially if is ACF certified. Then if she graduates she can go on to CIA for her Bachelors degree.
post #13 of 18
Oh no I totaly 100% agree with you but I am a student there now, and i know they were both gone for a while there. Im sure they put it back on, but yeah i agree all in all they DO stand to their high standards.

As for your step daughter, suggest a lower standard school such as JW or FCI, maybe something that isnt shoving them into something they dont know what they are there for, and maybe just going to the FCI in the city would be a better bet due to it being 6 months, not as much money and she can tough it out even if she doesnt like it just to get the degree. Signing up for a 40 thousand dollar school to be there for 4 months and say F this and walk out is a waste. So make sure you have a good talk with her, annnnnd i would say that it really isnt your spot to tell her so. Time for her daddy to step in..........
"Some of us Cook. Some of us Grow. All of us Eat."
Reply
"Some of us Cook. Some of us Grow. All of us Eat."
Reply
post #14 of 18

Im currently studying International Restaurant Management at Le Cordon Bleu, I am planning to take a semester off and go to NYC and study at a culinary college and then come back and finish the remaining 1 year and half of my degree, I have been accepted into the French Culinary Institute, for the Class Culinary Course. 

 

Im really confused as to - 

 

1. Would this 6 month course teach me all the basics of cooking ? 

2. Should I wait for my course and apply for the Associates Degree at CIA, which is a 2 year course and I ll actually get a degree?

3. Will 6 month course be able to land me jobs in the kitchen like a line chef to start with? Cause i know i have the passion to learn , and will be able to learn alot more when Im on the job also.

 

Thanks 

 

PLEASE HELP ASAP 

post #15 of 18

FCI is a very good school with a comprehensive, fast-moving curriculum.  When I was deciding between the 2 schools, it became apparent that one major distinction between the 2 schools is that CIA will spend a fair amount of time on each topic, and FCI moves fairly quickly through them, although reinforces them throughout the different levels.

Like most any school, you get out of it what you put into it.

You will learn all the basics at FCI, but if you think for a second that after graduating any culinary program that makes you qualified to work on the line in a restaurant....um, you're naive and wrong.

 

You must work in a restaurant, for peanuts or peanut shells if necessary, before or during school.

 

*It's been happening forever, but how does somebody drop Forty-Thousand dollars on culinary school without having spent any real time working in foodservice?*

 

Not saying it applies to you, Confused, but if it does, ask other chefs.  Your passion and desire don't mean jack if you have no clue exactly what it is you're seemingly passionate about.

post #16 of 18

Yes chef, once I get through a culinary school I do plan to intern at ay cost for at least the next 10 year before starting my own thing.. I know what you mean.. I work in hospitality business not back of house but have a fair bit of understanding.. and im very passionate about learning each and every aspect of cooking.

 

Chef what I want to ask is that which college would you suggest ? FCI even though fast shall cover all the basics? 

post #17 of 18
You're funny.  And I'll leave it at that.

 

Seems like you're in no rush to finish school and make a living, so that's a factor, or non-factor to consider, or not.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by ChefDave11 View Post

FCI is a very good school with a comprehensive, fast-moving curriculum.  When I was deciding between the 2 schools, it became apparent that one major distinction between the 2 schools is that CIA will spend a fair amount of time on each topic, and FCI moves fairly quickly through them, although reinforces them throughout the different levels.

Like most any school, you get out of it what you put into it.

You will learn all the basics at FCI, but if you think for a second that after graduating any culinary program that makes you qualified to work on the line in a restaurant....um, you're naive and wrong.

 

You must work in a restaurant, for peanuts or peanut shells if necessary, before or during school.

 

*It's been happening forever, but how does somebody drop Forty-Thousand dollars on culinary school without having spent any real time working in foodservice?*

 

Not saying it applies to you, Confused, but if it does, ask other chefs.  Your passion and desire don't mean jack if you have no clue exactly what it is you're seemingly passionate about.

post #18 of 18

ok . any one else for advice ? :)

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home