or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Paris

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I'm not one of those travelers that feels theys must stay at the best hotel or eat at the finest resturant whenever I travel. Much prefer to find small, out-of-the way places to place my head and explore the non tourist areas in search of neighborhood resturants.
If you happen to be like me, and find yourself heading to Paris...the one in France...here are a couple of new found (for me) places.
First the hotel. I stayed at Hôtel des Chevaliers (The Hotel of Knights). Sadly, it was discovered that the hotel was undergoing renevation at the time of my stay so I was not able to enjoy the full charm. That did not stop me from enjoying my stay there. After all...I just sleep in the room. What more do I need? The website is http://www.chevaliers-paris-hotel.com/ for those interested. It's located not far from the Bastille Metro and an easy walk from gare de Lyon...the train station. I ate breakfast there each day. It wasn't bad but any American traveling to Europe for the first time might not understand the effort made in providing it.
There are two resturants that I really enjoyed while there. The first was located at the end of the block that the hotel is located on. Just walk out the door and turn left. You can't miss it. Named the Café Royal Turenne it's what would probably be called a neighborhood diner back in the states.
Small, cozy with signs and “decorations” on what seemed to be every available wall space…as well as the ceiling. My travel companion was a good friend of mine from Switzerland. We both ordered the Pounti D’Auvergne aux Pruneaux for our appetizer. It was a vegetable torte with prunes. Very good! Francis had cote de boeuf (which with my limited french translated as demension of ox)and fries. I ordered travers de porc avec miel et d’Auvergne et thym (sparerib of pork with honey and of Auvergne and thyme. I really need to learn more French!). Francis said his meal was good. I thought the beef looked a bit tough. Mine however was very enjoyable.
The next place is located not very far from the hotel as well. Crêperie Suzette can be found by leaving the hotel and turning left again. At Café Royal Turenne, turn right and cross the street and just walk a couple of blocks. Located on Franc-Bourgeois, it's a very small, nice little hole-in-the-wall resturant. There is an upstairs portion to the place which I did not see. I would dare say that most of us Americans would have difficulty getting to the seating area against the wall! Francis had La Charlot crepe. Cheese, minced meat, egg, tomato coulis (tomato purée) and basil and I had La Barbetter. A crepe consisting of cheese, bacon, cream and basil. We both thought they were just okay but the desserts! Wow! He had the Pommes (apple) Carmel crepe and I had the Crumble aux Pommes-apple and caramel crumble. We both agreed that the desserts made the place. We ate at other locations during our stay which were just okay but found ourselves back at Crêperie Suzette three times during our stay just for the desserts!!
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME stuff, why didn't he just buy dinner?
Reply
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME stuff, why didn't he just buy dinner?
Reply
post #2 of 12
I'll put this on my list of places to visit. I seem to find my way to Paris every decade or so!
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #3 of 12

My Favorite Breakfast Place in Paris

is Cafe Mouffetard, at the foot of the rue Mouffetard, in the 5me. It's very unobtrusive, and looks more like a bar on the outside, but don't be deterred. They make all their own brioche, croissants and pain complet. It's hard to decide what to choose, but I have to tell you the brioche is the most wonderful I have ever eaten. It's like silk. :)

The rue Mouffetard is a permanent Market Street, and there are lots of small shops lining the street where you can get goodies like cheese, fruit, charcuterie and the like to enjoy a picnic or just a snack in your room.
post #4 of 12
My top place for both wine and food is "Le Pre Verre" The people there have a great artisan-vintners wine list and I alway ask them what wine pairs best with the food we ordered. It is very close to Bd Saint Germain.You'll fin the place on Google.

Another one is "Le Georges" on the roof of Centre Pompidou . Great view on Paris roofs. A bit more expensive but very good value for a glass if you choose to skip food there.
post #5 of 12
Stayed in a small boutique hotel in Bastille called Le Marceau. Very chic glass and stainless steel affair. The hotel receptionist reccomended a great little restaurant called Bofinger, 6 Rue de la Bastille, a little hard to find but it was a gem. Full of locals (always a good thing) and nobody speaking English, we managed to make our orders understood. Fantastic food, lots of fish, I started with oysters and followed with a scallop and asparagus risotto with truffled oil, so good I near copied it and put it on my menu. They even had a wet fish counter on the street and passers by were stopping to swallow oysters. Quite good value too as its not a touristy place.
post #6 of 12

Paris Hot Chocolate- Angelina's

If anyone goes to Paris, you've got to visit a place called Angelina's, which is on the street across from the Louvre. It's a nice "salon de the" (tea room, technically) which serves hot drinks, pastries and small meals.

The thing they do best, though, is hot chocolate. It's like liquid decadent pudding/mousse rolled up into a warm creamy drink.

Go to Angelina's. You won't regret it!
post #7 of 12
We went to Paris last May and we opted for an apartment in the Marias (Place des Vosges Paris Upscale Vacation rental) and it was an outstanding time. We made a point to eat at the oldest restaurant (La Tour d'Argent - La Tour d'Argent), the oldest brasserie (BoFinger -http://www.bofingerparis.com/en/) and the oldest cafe (Le Procoupe - Les Frères Blanc | Le Procope). In addition we also ate at Cafe D' Flor and Pierre Herme (for chocolate cake - Livraison de macarons, livraison de chocolats Pierre Hermé Paris).

The hotel you posted looks wonderful but I feel for the almost the same price you can get a wonderfull apartment with a washer, dryer, full kitchen, smal living room, large bedroom and large bathroom. It really made a huge difference in our trip and we would do it again.

I would like very much to try the restaurants everyone has recommended on our return. Hopefully the US dollar will be a little stronger.
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #8 of 12
Interesting. I believe, however, that the oldest restaurant still operating in Paris is Le Grand Vefour. However, its food no longer gets any better reviews than La Tour d'Argent, so I'm a bit curious what your fascination is with the "oldest."

Personally, I'm more fascinated by what is likely to be "the best," at least in someone's opinion. :smiles:

However, in Paris, how bad can any place be? ;)
post #9 of 12
When we ate at La Tour d"Argent we were told by the staff it was the oldest restaurant in Paris (Paris's oldest restaurant reopens with a taste for nouvelle cuisine - Europe, News - The Independent). We actually went there for lunch to try the famous pressed duck and enjoy the beautiful view (not because it was the oldest).

Actually I think the highlight of our trip was our dinner at Comme Chez Soi in Belgium. Spectacular.

I guess "the best" is relative to what you are going for? The best wine, the best calvados, the best poulet de Bresse etc. I do think we did enjoy the best chocolate cake at Pierre Herme and the best pressed duck at La Tour d"Argent in Paris anyway.

It was a great trip we can't wait to go back and try even more places.
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
Reply
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
[quote=Nicko;221129]The hotel you posted looks wonderful but I feel for the almost the same price you can get a wonderfull apartment with a washer, dryer, full kitchen, smal living room, large bedroom and large bathroom. It really made a huge difference in our trip and we would do it again.quote]

I can understand the need for someone traveling from the US to have the things mentioned, particularly if traveling with children.
Living in Switzerland allows me the ability to jump on a train and be in Paris in about four hours so it's usually a weekend or three to four day trip so there is no need for me to have anything other than a room to sleep in after a long day of walking and eating waaaaay too much food! Laundry gets done when I return home. As for having use of a kitchen...I suffer enough with my cooking when I'm home. I don't want to do it when I'm on holiday! (See how European I'm becoming? Holiday instead of vacation!) :lol:
Having said that, when I travel to destinations much further from home for longer periods of time, I do opt for something a bit bigger and with a few home comforts...but I still avoid cooking. The food is much better if it isn't prepared with my hands. :lips:
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME stuff, why didn't he just buy dinner?
Reply
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME stuff, why didn't he just buy dinner?
Reply
post #11 of 12
FWIW, cote de boeuf is usually a rib steak when you see it on the menu. My culinary French is rusty, but it's the only French I have. I believe, strictly translated, it's "side of beef." Francis is either a huge eater or he had steak frites.

BDL
post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
Sorry for not making it clear that I was joking about my French. It is horrible but I am able to get most of what I read. Unfortunatley my pronunciation is terrible. I'm sure it makes French ears bleed!
Yes, Francis had frites with his cote de boeuf but frites are french fries any place but France! :D
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME stuff, why didn't he just buy dinner?
Reply
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME stuff, why didn't he just buy dinner?
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Restaurant Reviews