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Fillet Mignon-Broiled?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Hi,

I have a couple of fillets I need to cook up tonight and I normally grill year round, but we are in the middle of quite a cold spell and just do not want to be out there tonight in the bitter cold.

I have never thrown a steak under the broiler (let alone a fillet) does anyone have a method that works well? I like my steak med rare and like the outside seared a bit. Is this possible in a home electric heat broiler? Anyone have a good method they can share. My two temp settings are low and high.

Thanks!
post #2 of 21
I'm not a fan of broiling meats -- a home broiler doesn't really get hot enough to put a good sear on the meat. (at least, mine doesn't :( )

If I were you, I'd sauté the filets instead:
  • turn on the exhaust fan to HIGH
  • heat a heavy sauté pan to very hot but not smoking (cast-iron is great)
  • make sure the flat surface of the meat is very dry, then season the top and brush lightly with oil
  • place the filets in the pan seasoned side down; season and brush what is now the top
  • let cook for a few minutes, until a nice crust forms
  • flip and cook on the other side until it crusts, and the meat feels slightly firm but still springy.

This can produce quite a bit of smoke (hence the exhaust fan) but gives you a seared but still med-rare piece of meat. :lips: And the cooking process is easier to control than when using the broiler.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #3 of 21
You can do it, but don't expect the same results. Grilling at high temp is much superior. But that said...

When broiling, I place the steaks on a rack over a pan of water and adjust the rack so the steaks are about 2" from the broiler element. The rack and water allow the juices to run off and reduce smoke.

My 1.5" steaks grill for 3-4 min per side at 700º, but must be broiled for 9-10 min per side to get a good sear. In the broiler that will result in a med steak. I find it almost impossible to get a med rare steak with a good sear in the broiler.

Although I haven't tried it yet, the next time I need to broil steaks, I plan to pan sear then finish in the broiler. I am guessing that pan sear and broil for 4 min per side will do the trick.

Hope that helps.
post #4 of 21
I've noticed that many of the newer stoves come with infra-red broilers.

Anyone have any experience as to how they compare to the standard electric elements?
post #5 of 21
I grill when it's -15F out, so I don't see why you can't.

Anyway, I would pan sear and finish in a 425F oven.

Sear them in a pan, and like Suzanne says, turn the fan on high. :D Then transfer them to the oven. I actually prefer to transfer to the oven on a rack with a pan underneath.

Deglaze the pan with red wine. Reduce a little. Drizzle over the steaks when ready to serve.
post #6 of 21
For broiling, in my experience the height of the meat or other ingredients, gives me a lot of control over how quickly or slowly it cooks. If you want it to cook at more intense heat, raise the pan closer to the elements. But then, too close and it doesn't cook evenly.
post #7 of 21

minnesotan

Thank you for that! Got to love Minnesotans/Wisconsinites.... I grill all year round. Last saturday when it was just about that I was grilling poblanos. .... Grilling is year round. always can rely on the grill
post #8 of 21
Thread Starter 
So, I did my meat last night using ajoe's method. They turned out OK, but that definitly is the last time I will do steak in the oven. However, it was a great cut of meat, so it wan't bad. I'll wait until temps are above freezing before grilling next time.

kuan-good for you grilling in -15 temps! I'll stick to my big bowl of soup and the fireplace! Although I'm a Chicago native, I've come quite accounstomed to the mild winters here in Virginia. Luckily it only gets below 32 during February. Anything below 30 is a shock to my senses.
post #9 of 21
Suzanne's method is pretty much spot on,, I'd like to add a few points.

First, be sure the meat is at room temperature. Take it from the fridge and let it sit out for 30 - 45 minutes.

Second, put your skillet in a very hot (500-degree) oven until it's very, very hot.

Then, put the pan on the stive top, over a nice hot flame, and add the meat. Do not move the meat around. Let a nice crust form and then flip the meat.

Finish to you prefered doneness in a 400-degree or so oven,

Some people like cast iron pans for this, and they are just fine. However, I've used a nice, heavy, stainless steel lined saute pan, no oil on the meat, and the results were just as good. I just plopped the meat itothe very hot pan for a couple three minutes per side.

Smoke has never been a problem for me - maybe it's the stainless v cast iron difference.

For me stainless has been easier to deglaze than the cast iron.

shel
post #10 of 21
For me tenderloin doesn't lend itself to broiling, I prefer to panfry in whole butter with mushrooms. The mushrooms continually release there moisture so the butter doesn't burn. Adjust the flame after it is seared to allow cooking to your favorite doneness. Try it you'll like it.

And yes, The butter will turn a nice golden brown, That's the flavor.:chef:
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One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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post #11 of 21
Interesting technique. How big, 4oz or so?
post #12 of 21
I should probably keep myself to myself on this, but doesn't "panfrying" with mushrooms in the pan sort of stew the meat?

I'm with kuan, suzanne and shel, although my technique differs slightly -- plus I'd like to add a pro techique everyone does, but for some reason no one ever talks about. An added benefit of "pan-broiling" is the taa-daa BIG FINISH.

Remove your steaks from the fridge, and marinate it on the kitchen counter in a mix made of
1 tbs EVO,
1 tbs red wine, madeira or sherry, and
1 tbs Worcesterhire sauce.
for anywhere between 10 minutes and 1/2 hour. Note, This is enough marinade for two steaks, there should be very little liquid in the pan, just enough to coat the bottom. In a short time, the marinade will mix with the steak's juices and thicken to a heavy syrup. This is a good thing.

About 5 minutes before cooking, drain the marinade from the pan and season both sides of the steaks with Morton's Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper. You may, if you like, use my California Dry Rub for Beef instead.
California Dry Rub for Beef:
1/4 cup Morton's Kosher salt,
1-1/2 tbs fresh, coarsely cracked black pepper,
2 tsp California chili powder or sweet-medium paprika,
2 tsp granulated garlic,
1 tsp granulated onion,
pinch sage, and
pinch thyme.
One of the big differences between home and professional cooks is that home cooks tend to under-season. Don't be intimidated. Judge how much rub you'll use by the concentration of salt.

In the meantime, finely mince a tbs or two of shallots and parsley, and prep your mise en place with:
1 oz cognac,
2 oz madeira sherry, or more cognac, if desired,
1/4 cup heavy cream,
1-1/2 cold, salted butter, cut into 3 pieces,
1/2 tspdijon mustard if desired, and
green or pink pepper corns if desired.

Heat a heavy but responsive (not cast iron) pan that can take some abuse to near searing temp and add a couple of drops of EVO, swirl the pan so the oil coats the bottom. The hot oil will run very freely. It will also start to smoke quickly. Get the steaks in the pan immediately and let them sear.

Here's the tip part: Don't touch those bad girls. Don't lift them. Leave them alone for at least 2 minutes. Shake the pan gently to see if they'll release on their own. If not, leave them alone for another minute and give the pan another, more vigorous shake. If the still won't move, knock them on their side with your spatula or tongs to get them sldiing. Once sliding, you can turn them.

When the steaks are turned, let them cook for no more than a minute before putting them, pan and all, in a 400 degree oven. Assuming a 6 oz, 1-1/2" fillet remove them from the oven after 7 minutes for a point. Remove the steaks from the pan to rest on a warm plate.

if there's substantial fat in the pan, drain about 2/3 and return the pan to the stove. If the pan is more or less dry, just return it to a hot flame. Flame off an ounce or so cognac. When the flames have died, unstick the fond and add your aromatics (except for the parsley), and move everything around around with your tongs-- incorporating the fond. Then add the additional wine or booze if you're using it and let it reduce. Add the cream and as soon as it comes to a boil reduce the heat to medium and stir until the sauce has reached nappe consistency. Whisk in 1-1/2 tbs of butter, broken into 3 pieces, one small piece at a time, incorporating each piece before adding another. Turn off the heat before adding the last piece and incorporate that with the residual heat. Whisk in half the parsley.

Plate the steaks with the best presentation side up, rotated it so their best looking part is closest to the plate's edge. Sauce with a soup spoon, covering 1/2 - 2/3 of the surface of the filet, leaving the best looking part naked. Use enough sauce so it drips generously onto the steak forming a small puddle. Add just enough parsley for a fresh appearance.

Voila!

Discussion:

1. There are a number of techniques within this simple recipe. Searing includes encouraging meat proteins to undergo a process similar to carmelization, called the Maillard reaction. When done right, most of the browned, crystallized proteins stay with the surface of the meat and some, along with a touch of seasoning from the meat, will stay with the pan. If you remove the meat from the surface of the pan too soon, you'll alter the reaction and the meat will never brown properly. If you wait too long, the taste will move from sweet to bitter. Fortunately, a clean, smooth, seasoned or lightly oiled pan, will hold the meat until it's ready to turn, then release it at exactly the right moment.

When the meat goes into the oven, the surface temperature actually goes down slightly and the juices will begin to run -- slightly. When these juices hit the hot pan they, along with the glaze from the sear process form the fond, which in turn, structures the reduction sauce.

2. The sauce is called a "pan reduction," and it is a "nappe." The recipe I've given you is a simple, classic, yet typical reduction. The constants are the deglaze and incorporation of fond, and the final nappe consistency. Don't mess with them. The range of ingredients is enormous, feel free to substitue anything for anything else as per your whim. Simplicity is key. Remember the meat is the painting and the sauce its frame. And even within the context of the sauce itself, your goal is to high-light the fond.

BDL
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post #13 of 21
No stewing takes place, The smaller the piece of beef the less butter used, Typically a 6-8 oz. piece ia preferable(for me anyway). It is "Panfry" not "Panstew".:chef:
http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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post #14 of 21

Broiled Filet?

Personally I never use the electric broiler for anything other than to brown a pizza or for garlic toast. It is about minus 37 C where I am. If I'm not using the grill at the restaurant I will bring my propane BBQ tank inside for a few hours then grill them outside. Propane acts pretty goofy below minus 20 or so.

Good luck.
post #15 of 21
Ma Facon,

The proof, as they say, is in the pudding. I was taught to saute the 'shrooms as part of a deglaze and given the "stew" hypothesis as a rationale. Since then, I've never tried cooking the steak in the mushrooms. My fears defer to your results!

BDL
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http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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What were we talking about?
 
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post #16 of 21
It is all about technique, Temperature and a cast iron pan. Whole mushrooms not sliced, A nice barrel filet and patience and understanding how butter cooks under high heat. I have worked in more than a few steakhouses in the midwest and have cooked pork chops like this, NY Strips, Disjointed chicken etc...Turns out very rich, Tasty and fulfilling.:chef:
http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
Reply
http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
Reply
post #17 of 21
So how much butter do you use in the pan? A lot?
post #18 of 21
Yes, And the proper size castiron pan, High heat. The heat is controlled as fry in brown butter, Not burnt butter. The mushrooms aid in this by releasing there liquid as they fry.
http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
Reply
http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
Reply
post #19 of 21
Doesn't it take you quite awhile? Plus you gotta keep an eye on it. You got me thinking this is like making souffle potatoes.
post #20 of 21
One should keep an eye on everything in the kitchen, When your working the stove you have a ball and chain anyway, Right ?:chef:
http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
Reply
http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
Reply
post #21 of 21
Heh yeah. I'll give it a try one of these days. :)
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