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Whistling.....

Poll Results: Do you allow whistling in you PROFESSIONAL kitchen?

 
  • 22% (5)
    Yes
  • 54% (12)
    No
  • 22% (5)
    I wanted to answer, but I dont work in a professional kitchen
22 Total Votes  
post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
So whats this old deal with whistling in the kitchen "its bad luck" or "it means you want to kill the chef"?
I hate it because if a cook is whistling then they aren't working fast enough. If a server is whistling, then they are causing noise in the kitchen, that isn't needed when people are concentrating.
________________IRONCHEFATL___
How come "dishwasher" is not listed as a choice for culinary experience?

"...the very genesis of our art."
- Escoffier on grilling
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________________IRONCHEFATL___
How come "dishwasher" is not listed as a choice for culinary experience?

"...the very genesis of our art."
- Escoffier on grilling
Reply
post #2 of 19
I hate it. To me, it means people are screwing around when they should be focusing on what they're doing. That, and I don't think the kitchen I work in employs any birds.
post #3 of 19
I would rather listen to them sing, then.Whistling
No one I my shop knows how to do it, so it sounds good. It's like nails on a chalkboard to me.And I shut it down quickly.
post #4 of 19

sheesh

lighten up!
post #5 of 19
Whistling is extremely annoying to me. But the story on whistling actually goes back to before the realm of kitchens. In the old, old sailing days, sailors would whistle and use that as code when they were going to launch a mutiny against the captain. So translate that to modern kitchen times, the cooks whistling = mutiny against the Chef.

I don't really think that happened all that many times in a kitchen, but its a good story to say the least. I am not bothered by idea of whistling itself, and I don't worry about a mutiny, I just find it annoying when there are 12 of us busting our *** and being silent. Breaking that silence is like breaking the mantra. Can't allow it.
post #6 of 19
I really dont see the big deal. If it doesnt affect the quality/rate of food being put out, I really could care less.
post #7 of 19
Wowzee, I am a merchant marine cook for about 40 years now and had never heard the kitchen analogy?
One does not whistle on the bridge or with many Captains the back deck--you will whistle up a storm!! For the same reason, no split pea soup, A.K.A. storm soup.
So I whistle away in the galley (thank God I don't sing!). I also pretty much work alone, hehe.
But have to admit, unless someone is good at it, it makes me crazy.
Nan
post #8 of 19

Focus Daniel-san

It's pretty much a matter of concentration and communication no? I mean if your whistling your not concentrating 100% or listening to 100% of whats going on around you. So whistling is a blatent display of a lax attitude. During a prep period, stop whistling and work faster, get ready for service and clock out for your break that much sooner. ( aka whistle on your own time ) During service, absolutely not, you need to communicate with your chefs/cooks unhinderd. Plus focus on making every plate as perfect as possible. Now during clean up.. less of a big deal, I like to sing as I clean a kitchen myself, dont think it slows me down that much,I like hearing others sing as well, even if they arent that good, shows passion. Whistling just seems like something you do when your bored. Disrespectful to your craft and the professionals working around you.
post #9 of 19
I hate whistling when I'm trying to work, but I don't tell people they can't do it. I actually think it's a way for some people to concentrate- sort of blocking out the ambient noise and getting inside yourself. I suppose that wouldn't work in a kitchen where orders are being called out on a line.

I had a baker (or a woman who professed to be a baker, but really was a total failure at the job) who whistled. She drove me crazy on so many levels, the whistling was just icing on the cake. As someone else said above- like fingernails on a chalkboard.

My present assistant talks to herself. I've stopped asking if she's talking to me figuring she'll say my name if she wants me. The baker also talks to herself when she's working on a new recipe. I talk to myself or sing when I'm in the kitchen alone.
post #10 of 19
Sailor whistling is not bad luck, it's good luck. Sailors would "whistle up a wind." Whoever told the mutiny story was pulling your leg.

On the other hand, whistling aroundsailors can be bad luck. The superstition that it's bad luck for an actor to whistle back stage supposedly owes its origin to the fact(?!) that many old-time grips were supposedly ex-sailors who called rigging cues by whistling to one another. So, if an actor whistled he might be telling the stage-hand to drop something on his head.

Anyway, that's the apocryphal explanation regarding back stage whistling and like so many theater stories may be a fantasy. But, as an ex studio grip, I can tell you that when it comes to some actors, the brothers didn't need much encouragement.

The idea that whistling is bad luck in a professional kitchen might have something to do with the fact that back in the day so many chefs were alcoholic and incredibly bad tempered. Annoy one and cutlery flew. A flying cleaver certainly is not good luck. Even if it misses, it's upsetting.

Sadly, the whole alcohol-temper-cutlery thing is is true. Not sure about the whistling.

BDL
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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post #11 of 19
Whitling ok.

Tuneless whistleing NOT ok.

Even worse:

Made up parody song lyrics (often insanly obscene) sung along to whatever is playing on the radio.
post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 
So you have experienced that one too...sometimes you gotta wonder what is going is some peoples mind :crazy:
________________IRONCHEFATL___
How come "dishwasher" is not listed as a choice for culinary experience?

"...the very genesis of our art."
- Escoffier on grilling
Reply
________________IRONCHEFATL___
How come "dishwasher" is not listed as a choice for culinary experience?

"...the very genesis of our art."
- Escoffier on grilling
Reply
post #13 of 19
Guilty as charged
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
Reply
post #14 of 19
It has been my experience that a radio is pretty much standard equipment in the kitchen. There have been many arguments as to why it should or should not be there.

More arguments have been on the type of music being played. The Demographics of chefs is too wide I guess..:lol:

Meh- on whistling- I would find it to be irritating, especially if I am really focusing on making a product come out just right.
post #15 of 19
Lighten up and tune it out. Sheesh, a radio is more distracting.
Fluctuat nec mergitur
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Fluctuat nec mergitur
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post #16 of 19
Discrete whistlings, yes.
post #17 of 19

whistling

when i was in school ages ago it was believed that when you whistle, then your basically spitting into the food, makes sence but it is also a distraction within the work area, but it doesnt bother me, id rather have a radio like ^^^ IMO people who are annoyed at that need to lay off the coke.

chris
post #18 of 19
I can't stand it if it's tuneless, inane whistling. If the person is actually whistling a recognizable tune, then it's OK. It's hard to just tune out something that's really annoying. I can't do it. The more it annoys me, the more it takes priority of mental focus. The result is a pounding headache. I prefer silence or music that can fade into the background. I don't allow rap or whatever it is that is passing for heavy metal music these days. I've heard garbage disposals with more musical talent. Last summer I had a dishwasher who kept playing Down With the Sickness. I told him to knock it off or the radio was going out the back door. He didn't thinkI was serious until he was chasing the radio and his cd across the lparking lot. If someone is making some kind of unnecessary racket that is annoying someoune else, they have to stop it.
post #19 of 19

Whistling

I was told many years ago that it was only used as an alarm for a fire, personally I think the chef had a blinding hang over wanted some peace and quiet, the first kitchen I worked in london we weren't allowed to talk let alone whistle
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