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How do you clean your chef jacket? - Page 2

post #31 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by spikebones View Post

hello everyone :)

i have the worst stain EVER! on my jacket :( carbon. pitch black, super fine carbon. you know the stuff you find on the side of the pot when your flames are burning yellow. anyway, this is one's persistant. it wont budge. i've bleached, washed & soaked, you name it... it's still there. if there is anyone here who knows how to remove it successfully, please share the love. if it works, i will personally bake you the MEANEST chocolate sponge cake ever, fill it with any filling of your choice, cover it in chocolate and fedex it to your door step.



You could try Carbon Off

post #32 of 52

LOL. I love this thread. 

 

Hey Tincook ..... You're replying to a request ? from 3-26-08. Just so you know. Ed Buchanan  made a comment that commercial laundries can use live steam. If you work in a cool enough place, one with really good espresso machines, you can use live steam too. I've scrubbed liquid dish soap into stains at breakdown time, then let them sit until we were finished with cleanup. Before walking out, I used the milk foaming arm on the coffee machine to steam blast out the stain. It worked pretty well. Wearing a black coat is a really good problem solver too, T-Y FrySauce. So is just buying a new coat (+/-$16 by me). ChefSeanVincent's idea of having a fancy coat put away for special deals is really smart. Anyway ... there have been a lot of great suggestions made in this thread. My addition is hand cleaner from the auto parts store. "Goop", "Gunk" and "Green Stuff" have been my favorite brands over the years. I've scrubbed it in when I got home and thrown the coat on the pile for laundry. They've always come out clean. I hope I've helped this old thread. LOL. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

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"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #33 of 52

Hey Tincook ..... You're replying to a request ? from 3-26-08. Just so you know.

 

I was #hacked!!!!

post #34 of 52

LOL my friend. You're in good company. I've replied just like that to a half dozen or so threads. Still, this is a good topic. They haven't, to my knowledge, yet made any "no need for cleaning" chef coats. I'll order a dozen or so when they do. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #35 of 52

Tide stain stick attacks stains as soon as they happen. This is followed by a cold water wash using 1:1:2 bleach:fairy dish soap:tide for cold water.

 

That was my savior back in cooking school.

I now have my jackets (whole uniform, generally) laundered professionally. I couldn't be happier!

post #36 of 52

Oxy clean soak as other people stated but a great tip I picked up when working in Aus is to use eucalyptus oil when soaking, or whatever smelling oil you like. Cuts through that grease smell thats always hard to get rid of especially on aprons.

post #37 of 52

I am a chef in a very busy, very large commercial kitchen. I go through a lot of jackets in a week - one or more each day!

The best and easiest solution I have found is to set up a big tub of soaking solution at the start of the week and throw the jackets in it at the end of each day.

You can take out the ones put in the previous day and put them in washing machine. A 24-soak should get rid of the stains. You can leave them in for longer if you wish.

The soaking solution is nothing special - a store-bought oxy soaking powder - that means its active ingredient is sodium percarbonate.

In Australia (where I am now) I use one called Sard. There are plenty of similar ones available in the US, the UK and elsewhere.

The soaking water needs to be cold (hot will "fix" stains). But you can wash later in hot water. I also put a scoop of the oxy soaker in the wash cycle with the washing powder. This seems to help get a better result.

 

post #38 of 52

This is a reply in regards to getting the chefs whites bright again. Put 1/2 cup of bicarbonate soda in with the washing powder then 1/2 cup of white vinegar in with the rinse cycle. DON'T PUT THEM IN TOGETHER OR YOU'LL GET FIZZ! My sister put me on to this tip when she was using cloth nappies as the vinegar helps to brighten, deoderise and sterilise whilst not being harsh on fabric or skin. You might find a faint vinegar odour when you hang clothes out to dry but i've found that the sun takes care of this :)

Hope that helps! Now if I can just figure out how to get the actual stains out of my husbands nice bright jackets I'll be very happy indeed! Anyone know what the Australian equivalent of Tide or Shout Ultra Gel would be? We don't have those products here :(

 

post #39 of 52

I send to commercail linen company. They use STEAM  which is best and only way to get them stain free. I and everyone else has tried other ways over the years.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #40 of 52

iv washed my own jackets for years, iv always stuck with dawn for grease and white vineger for tomatoe based stains allways let set before washing, and yes that new shout gel works great also! i usually stick with things i have around the house but for those who are washing five to seven coats a week buying a nice industrial cleaner makes it alot easier.

 

post #41 of 52
I don't use bleach because it yellows the jacket. I do however use oxy clean, baking soda, and blue dawn to make a paste and apply it to the stain. Then I wash the jacket with tide in cold water. Works wonders!
post #42 of 52

I believe several people here have hit the nail on the head pretty well.  I've always used a cold water soak with Oxi-Clean for a few hours (or overnight if it's really bad) and then into the washer (usually set to cold, but occasionally hot as needed).  The method I usually used is an overnight soak in Oxy-Clean by filling the bathtub with enough water to submerge a week's worth of chef coats and pants (yes, I actually have that many now, lol) and mixing in a (roughly) appropriate amount of Oxi-Clean powder.  I've had aprons I borrowed come out cleaner than they'd been in a year or two after washing them this way.  I prefer not to use Corox (or other brand bleaches) as they can mess with the other colors you may have (ie logos, embroidery, etc), and in too-large of a quantity (or too long of a soak) can shorten the life-span of the material (causes the material to begin to break down faster).  Thankfully, I no-longer need to worry about cleaning my own uniforms since my new job supplies them for me every day...but now I've a closet full of coats and pants that I don't use, lol.

post #43 of 52

I am originally from the Midwest, and we had a product called GOOP.  I recently relocated and found this product here in San Diego!!  What a god-send!  Apply GOOP paste to the stain(s), let sit until dry (yes, until dry) and wash in cold.  I use tide and then add oxyclean liquid.  WHITER THAN WHITE, every time.  You might need to apply twice to certain stains, if that is the case, always check the chef coat right out of the washer, BEFORE it goes in the dryer and reapply as needed. Oh, and ALWAYS wear a halter apron. (your chef coats will thank you). If your restaurant doesn't provide them, they have great prices at Costco, buy three or so of your own.  Take pride in your uniform Chefs!!

 

Chef Mark 

post #44 of 52

The way I keep my coats clean is 1/2 cup resolve whitening powder, 1 cup peroxide, and normal amount of laundry soap. I've told my staff tomdo this as well. The ones who listen have white coats like me,  and mine are 18 months old :) 

post #45 of 52
I have an issue with being able to soak them. I work in a remote camp. 44 rooms 3 laundry machines and 1 sink. As it is this hitch I have 13 coats with me so I only have to do my whites once. on top of that we process our own water so bleach is forbidden!

Mr. Clean floor cleaner has been my best bet but it isn't great.
post #46 of 52
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChOpStIx View Post

I don't use bleach because it yellows the jacket. I do however use oxy clean, baking soda, and blue dawn to make a paste and apply it to the stain. Then I wash the jacket with tide in cold water. Works wonders!

Exactly what I use for taking the stains out.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #47 of 52
I soak my work clothes in a mixture of heavy duty degreaser(found in every kitchen I've ever worked in!), hot ass water, and oxy clean. Leave it soaking for 10-15 minutes and wash as per usual. Gets out tough grease spots and everything else I've thrown at it.
post #48 of 52

Bleach, heavy duty degreaser, and then in the sink overnight with cold water.

Wash them it in a machine twice so you don't get burnt.

They come out sparkling.

 

Not advisable for the dainty skinned folk I'd imagine.

post #49 of 52

Not loads, I should add, try two very generous slugs of each liquid.

post #50 of 52
I ask the owner of my local laundry mat what he uses and he turned me on to a product called Laundry Targo, which is a residential version of a commercial product used in dry cleaners.
A bit expensive up front, $20-$25, but a bottle will last you a very long time in comparison to normal laundry detergent.
Very good investment if you job requires whites as uniform and does not offer cleaning services.
You can find it on Amazon. The big bottle (1 gallon) is $90-$100 and the small version is, give or take $20.
Hope this helps!
post #51 of 52

I have always used tide and add clorox for colors (so I don't ruin my embroidery). If I have something really bad, Ill hit it will a bleach stick first and rub that in. 

 

This seems to work for me. I have heard OXY CLEAN works well. As a private chef now (no more owning my place THANK GOD) don't wear a jacket as often as before but will try the oxy clean

"Failure Is Not An Option"
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"Failure Is Not An Option"
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post #52 of 52

Depends on the colour I think, for whites then certainly some of these tricks will help to keep the intensity of the white colour, but as Ed Buchanan points out, think bleach might not be a good idea in the long run. If you've got jackets in different colours then washing at higher temperature will probably cause the colour to fade. Some modern jackets have more durable 'colourfast' dye which is said to hold the colour better. i.e https://www.catering-uniforms.co.uk/product/chefs-jacket-stud-button-technicolour-long-sleeve/. This says its a mix of cotton and polyester so ought to be okay. Maybe having some 'public facing' jackets and some working ones is a cheaper compromise than professional laundry on a regular basis.

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