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Chile Pepper vs Powder

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
Hey Folks- First time caller here with what may be a remedial question. I'm working on a recipe that recommends a number of different kinds of chile powders; Ancho, Pasilla, New Mexican, and Cascabel. I can't seem to find some of these anywhere, but I can find the whole, dried peppers. Could it be as simple as grinding these peppers into powder?
post #2 of 5
Simple answer: yes. :D

Slightly more complicated answer: Remove the stems and seeds of the dried chiles (or leave some seeds if you want it hotter). Toast the dried chiles until fragrant (in a very hot oven or a dry skillet). Let cool. Grind in a food processor; transfer to a blender and grind again. Keep straining and grinding until it is as powdery as you want.

And a warning: wear a mask over your mouth and nose while grinding. I speak from experience. :eek:
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #3 of 5
Yes

Phil
post #4 of 5
Thread Starter 
Thanks! :smiles:
post #5 of 5
Likewise, having an inventory of some whole dreid chiles is better. As needed, you can make your own toasty fresh powders for dry seasoning, and superior chile sauce ,using whole vs. powder. For example when making Texas Chilli....Sweat down a mess of onions, toast chiles, cumin, beef broth, and so on.. Then puree and strain.
________________IRONCHEFATL___
How come "dishwasher" is not listed as a choice for culinary experience?

"...the very genesis of our art."
- Escoffier on grilling
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________________IRONCHEFATL___
How come "dishwasher" is not listed as a choice for culinary experience?

"...the very genesis of our art."
- Escoffier on grilling
Reply
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