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baking blind

post #1 of 2
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For my daughter's birthday I baked her a lemon pie (because it's her favorite). And ONCE AGAIN I became totally stressed out over the pie crust (which has always been to me the key to grreat pie!) I put the crust together the night before, and left it overnight in the fridge to 'relax.'
In the morning I covered my work-bench with these freezer packs, to get the surface cold. I laid out some wax paper, dusted it with flour, rolled out the dough, and slid it over my rolling pin and thence into the greased glass pie tin. I trimmed the dough about 1/2 inch above the rim and then crimped it all around. THEN, back into the fridge (for two hours) for further relaxation. I should get a quarter of the relaxation this fershlugginner dough gets. then I put it into the FREEZER for an hour while I pre-heated the oven to 425F.
Took it out of the freezer, lined the inside with parchment paper, and p0ured in about a buck's worth of pennies, and put the whole thing in the oven on the bottom rack.
Five minutes later I spun it around. Five minutes after that I whjipped it up to the middle rack and dropped the heat to 350. Took it out fifteen minutes later.
WHY had one of the sides slid down to about 3/4 inch below the rim. It didn't 'shrink'--it kind of thawed . . . accordioned down.
IS THERE a professional fail-safe way of doing this? It's always luck with me when it comes to blind baking. Help. Puhleeze. I can;t take this anymore.
post #2 of 2
First of all, calm down. You are agonizing way too much about the pie crust. Ever heard the saying "easy as pie"? Chill to relax the dough before rolling for about 30 minutes, but that's usually enough.

Next, you do not need to grease your pie pan. There is enough fat in pie crust dough to keep it from sticking to the pan. This step probably contributed to the accordion sides that you described.

Chilling the prepared pie crust will help it keep its shape, but the best way to keep the sides up in during a prebake is to fill the crust completely with pie weights. Pennies are a bit of overkill as they are too heavy and dense. I use old dry beans, rice, stale coffee beans-anything that's been lying around the pantry a bit too long. When done, cool them & store in a zip lock bag or old tin for the next time. Again, make sure to fill your crust with weights all the way up the sides to make sure they stay up during the baking process.

Lining in parchment is fine, but it tends to tear more easily when heated, thus the pie weights tear through when you try to remove them. I use foil-it's easier to press up the sides of your crust to keep them in shape. It's also easier to remove with the pie weights without tearing.

Lastly, all this adjusting of the heat is too much trouble. Just bake your crust at 375 until slightly browned (if you are using a baked filling) or until golden brown and baked through. A hot oven at 425 will burn your pretty crimping before the bottom is cooked through. Sure, give the pie crust a spin half way through to assure even cooking, but usually, it's not necessary.

As a side note, check out a book called CookWise by Shirley Corriher. She gives the best instructions for lemon meringue pie I've ever seen. Good Luck!

www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

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www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

Reply
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