New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Polenta Question

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I made polenta tonight in an cast iron enamel coated dutch oven.

6 cups water
2 cups course corn grits
1/2 t cajun spice
2 bay leaves
dash worchestershire sauce
1/2 t thyme
dash tobasco

(I left out any butter or oil because I'm trying to lose weight.)

The directions were to get water boiling, add ingredients and simmer for 30 minutes, stirring frequently, which I thought I did, although frequently can be a matter of opinion.

There was some polenta stuck to the bottom of the pot. I scrubbed so hard, I took quite a bit of enamel off of the bottom of the pot.

What is your opinion of "stir frequently" or could I have cooked it too long or wrong kind of pot? What did I do wrong?

Any advice would be appreciated.
post #2 of 12
Polenta will detach from the pot if you have the patience to leave it full of cold water overnight and not try to clean it right away. Then it just lifts off in one piece, unless some parts are burned. If some parts are burned, put some washing soda in it, if you can find it (arm and hammer makes it, it's a laundry additive) - if you can't find it use baking soda (bicarbonate of soda) - fill with water and bring to a boil, then let it sit.
Never try to clean the polenta pot until it's soaked several hours. It always sticks to the pot, and it will always come off this way.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #3 of 12
Thirty minutes seems extremely long. Were you trying to make soft polenta?
post #4 of 12
30 minutes is perfectly normal for polenta
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #5 of 12
Maybe I'll try cooking it longer next time I make it.
post #6 of 12

stirring frequently

The thing to keep in mind is that as the polenta cooks down there is less free moisture. So you have to stir more often.

Thus, when you first put it up, you can do other tasks, giving the pot a swirl now and again. But as the corn absorbs the moisture it is more likely to stick unless you monitor it, and stir often. Towards the end you might be stirring non stop.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #7 of 12

chef monganie

Sounds like the heat was to high.
post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks everyone. I'll stir constantly towards the end next time, which I didn't do, and I'll let the pot sit overnight with cold water in it, which I didn't do. I put cold water in it but then I boiled the water for a while and then tried to scrap it out and scrub. I'll try lowering the temp even more towards the end. I appreciate all suggestions.

Katie
post #9 of 12
I have never seen polenta that doesn't stick. That's the nature of it. Stirring constantly is a waste of time, in my opinion, and although everyone here in italy seems to consider it necessary I make polenta all the time for italians and they think i must be from veneto (the land of polenta) because it's so good. Personally i think there is little you can do to go wrong.
It will stick. But so what. It will unstick if you soak it. You'll be surprised to see how easily it unsticks overnight. i usually cover it so the top cooks too, and stir vigorously every time i pass by.
it takes less work to unstick it than it does to stir constantly.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #10 of 12
Siduri, I believe we're using the word "sticks" differently.

You're referring to the fact polenta adheres to the pot. Which is true, that's it's nature. But, frankly, I clear most of that with a rubber spatula, and then add cold water as you do.

For most people, however, if left unmonitored the polenta actually cooks to the bottom and/or sides of the pot. Imagine it burning without turning color, if you will. Sometimes it actually forms a crust against the metal of the pot. That's the sort of sticking that stirring eliminates.

Two different things. And I imagine Katie's problem was the second sort.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #11 of 12
No, this is exactly the thing i'm talking about. Next step to burning. In half an hour of cooking with only occasional stirring, I;d like to see it do differently!

I nevertheless get it off simply by soaking overnight in COLD water - it just lifts off in one piece, quite amazing. And if any is more deeply burned on, i put the pot on the stove with water and a spoonful or two of washing soda (though baking soda is said to work too) - bring to a boil and leave overnight. (This is miraculous for all burned-on food - it simply wipes off with a sponge - hard to believe, but true.)
Stirring polenta is the kind of work i refuse to do.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #12 of 12
I posted an oven (no stir) polenta recipe here:
http://www.cheftalk.com/forums/food-...-question.html

I have made it a few times and it is the best I have ever made and less work and better then on the stovetop.

Luc H.
I eat science everyday, do you?
Reply
I eat science everyday, do you?
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking