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Chocolate Rum Cake - Page 2

post #31 of 39

The recipe for "wowie cake" is a good option for a vegan menu; I've successfully subbed out equal amounts of almond flour for the cocoa to make a vanilla version and added spices for a spiced version.  Google it for a recipe; they're all pretty much the same.  It scales up successfully; I've tripled the recipe for a 12x2" pan to make a single layer of cake (our wedding and occasion cakes are three layers of cake, two layers of filling.)  This cake doesn't rise very much so we don't torte it into layers, I just bake however many layers we need for the order.
 

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post #32 of 39

chocolate rum cake!!--- 200g neufchatel, 4 individual sponge cakes prefer chocolate(just buy from supermarket), 400ml warm choc ganache, 100g walnuts, 100g sultanas and 100g currants,150ml rum- 1 deep 9inch cake tin lined!

beat 1 cake with 100ml of ganache- putin tin as base- then beat the cheese, 3 cakes remaining ganache to a thick smooth paste -- pre soak the walnuts and sultana and currants, drain and slowly add the rum to mix then fold the walnut mix through the batter! and place into tin and press down level and let sit over night in fridge, decorate with little ganache and some glace cherries and almond 

post #33 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by qahtan View Post

RICH STOUT CAKE
This is a chocolate cake with a difference. It's a basic chocolate cake recipe with the addition of rich stout which makes a very deep, rich cake, not only with the flavour of stout but also the colour to go with it. Guinness works very well in this recipe. The combination of the soft brown sugar and stout gives you fuller texture and taste. Also 100-225g (4-8 oz) of plain chocolate can be grated into the mix to give an even stronger taste. It's very good to eat as a cake, or for real chocoholics, you could warm a slice in the microwave and serve it with a Rich Chocolate Sauce .
225g (8 oz) unsalted butter
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
350g (12 oz) soft brown sugar
2 teaspoons bicarbonate of soda
4 eggs, beaten
400 ml (14 fl oz) stout (Guinness)
225g (8 oz) plain flour
100g (4 oz) cocoa
Pre-heat the oven to 180C/350 F /gas 4. Butter a 20-25 cm (8-10 in) deep cake tin. Cream together the butter with the soft brown sugar.
Gradually add the beaten eggs. Sift together the flour, baking powder and bicarbonate of soda. Mix the stout with the cocoa powder. Now add the flour and stout mixes alternately to the butter and eggs until completely and evenly bound. You will find the consistency to be quite soft.
Spoon into the prepared tin and bake in the oven for 1 to 1-1/2 hours until set. You may need to cover with a piece of brown paper after an hour to prevent it browning too much. Allow to cool before removing from the tin. The stout cake is now ready -cheers!
SOURCE: Gary Rhodes

qahtan

 

Oooooooooooooooo...you have just made this chocoholic drool..............

post #34 of 39

sounds delish. how large are the sponge cakes? am i correct in reading that they all get crumbled?

post #35 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by qahtan View Post

RICH STOUT CAKE
This is a chocolate cake with a difference. It's a basic chocolate cake recipe with the addition of rich stout which makes a very deep, rich cake, not only with the flavour of stout but also the colour to go with it. Guinness works very well in this recipe. The combination of the soft brown sugar and stout gives you fuller texture and taste. Also 100-225g (4-8 oz) of plain chocolate can be grated into the mix to give an even stronger taste. It's very good to eat as a cake, or for real chocoholics, you could warm a slice in the microwave and serve it with a Rich Chocolate Sauce .
225g (8 oz) unsalted butter
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
350g (12 oz) soft brown sugar
2 teaspoons bicarbonate of soda
4 eggs, beaten
400 ml (14 fl oz) stout (Guinness)
225g (8 oz) plain flour
100g (4 oz) cocoa
Pre-heat the oven to 180C/350 F /gas 4. Butter a 20-25 cm (8-10 in) deep cake tin. Cream together the butter with the soft brown sugar.
Gradually add the beaten eggs. Sift together the flour, baking powder and bicarbonate of soda. Mix the stout with the cocoa powder. Now add the flour and stout mixes alternately to the butter and eggs until completely and evenly bound. You will find the consistency to be quite soft.
Spoon into the prepared tin and bake in the oven for 1 to 1-1/2 hours until set. You may need to cover with a piece of brown paper after an hour to prevent it browning too much. Allow to cool before rem oving from the tin. The stout cake is now ready -cheers!
SOURCE: Gary Rhodes

qahtan

I''ve made this cake and if you eat it same day I have to agree it is not nice at all. However, we had some left overs and got a choocolate craving 2 days later and it was divine. It seems that it needs to stand to develop the flavours. Qathan, I have also made it lots of times now, always a couple of days before needed and are always swimming in compliments afterwards.

post #36 of 39

yeah just 7-8 inch sponges will do! i usually just make 2* deep 21cm sponges but when purchasing from a shop they are usually a 7 inch sorry for delay in reply but i have been busy!

post #37 of 39
Hi there, I will be making a full sheet chocolate cake for my best friends big 50. Can you give me your ideas, on how much rum and sugar I should use? Also, should I leave the cake in the pan to poke and pour rum? Or should it be turned out on a board and then poked? Thanks so much for the help.
post #38 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

Some more thoughts:

With Norma on the stout cake. Sorry, Gathan. Didn't want to say before.

Also, a simple genoise should be in every baker's repertoire. In fact, in every good cook's. Full disclosure: I'm not much of a baker myself. I can't make you learn to bake one, but you really should -- especially if you want to see what lies beyond boxed cake recipes.

IMO, do not substitute vanilla for rum, just add the same amount of rum. Vanilla and rum are very good friends. Chocolate and vanilla are very good friends too. In fact, chocolate needs vanilla to taste right. Actually these three are more than friends. Can we talk?

The "poke holes, drizzle rum" thing is right. You'll probably find straight rum to have too much edge, though. Sweeten the rum by mixing it with confectioner's sugar or simple syrup. You want your syrup in the range of 2/3 rum to 1/3 sugar by volume to 50/50. Simple syrup to rum should be a straight 50/50. Taste the syrup before drizzling. It should tasted good. If it doesn't -- adjust.

Up-market commercial bakers prefer a kind of rum called Stroh 80 from Austria. It's a very high-proof, expensive, spiced rum. You can use Captain Morgan or any other reasonably priced spiced rum and get similar results. I prefer the less expensive rums for baking for their taste, not just because I'm cheap. Besides "spiced rum" there are lots of flavored rums these days; many perfect with chocolate -- coconut, orange, what have you. Rely on whimsy. If you want more of a straight rum taste try an aged rum like Appleton VX, Babancourt, Pusser's, or one of the Bacardi rums that advertises its age on the label. Dark or medium (like Mount Gay) rums are always superior to white for baking.

BDL

 

Hi there, I will be making a full sheet chocolate cake for my best friends big 50. Can you give me your ideas, on how much rum and sugar I should use? Also, should I leave the cake in the pan to poke and pour rum? Or should it be turned out on a board and then poked? Thanks so much for the help.
post #39 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidasDesserts View Post

sounds delish. how large are the sponge cakes? am i correct in reading that they all get crumbled?
sorry for delay been busy opening a new restaurant :-) yes crumb all the cake - i use 2 or 3 day old sponge as it holds better hence if workin from home easier to buy from shop :-)
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