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Blueberry Omelet

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Recently a show on Food Network featured a segment about eggs, and a restaurant featured in that segment showed a gawd-offal omelet that included, amongst other ingredients, berries and cream cheese. This gave me the idea to try a blueberry and cream cheese omelet - saw no need for all the other ingredients.

As an experiment, I made a traditional three egg omelet (in my new carbon steel French omelet pan) with lots of sweet butter and added some thawed wild blueberries and some natural cream cheese, Folded and flipped the omelet as usual on to a warmed plate. Man, it was delicious - better than I thought it would be.

Has anyone tried something like this? I wonder how it might be with other berries or fruit. Any tried and true suggestions?

shel
post #2 of 13
:( Oh wow!
I've never thought of that kind of combo! Guess I'm gonna have to give it a whirl tomorrow and think about it...
Then I can report back with other suggestions maybe.
Wow!
post #3 of 13
Shel, your story reminded me of my dad's "special omelet" he used to make for us when mom couldn't make our pre-Sunday School breakfast.

He'd scramble up a dozen eggs for the four of us kids, then put them on a large platter (aqua Melmac, as I recall) and daub it with blobs of grape jelly. I distinctly remember the eggs looking like they had livid bruises on them from the jelly. :eek:

One of my favorite breakfast dishes is scrambled eggs studded with bits of cream cheese (chive cream cheese is excellent in this). I'd think your cream cheese and berry omelet would taste similar to a blintz, and it'd be delicious.
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post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
When I was a kid, and left to y own devices to make breakfast, I'd sometimes make a matzoh meal "pancake" - eggs mixed with matzoh meal to make a nice, firm omelet or pancake, and then slather it with strawberry preserves.

We used to have the colorful Melmac plates as well - yellow, some sort of pink, that aqua blue, and green. I always preferrd the aqual blue plates <LOL>

shel
post #5 of 13
1970's in Memphis there was an omelet restaurant with dessert omelets....had one once, it was enough.
Remember Crepe places.....there was a place at Gheradelli's that had French onion soup and a kajillion crepes. Really good soup, and the crepes were interesting. Must have been in the 70's too, I was a teenager visiting my dad in Sacramento.
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post #6 of 13
Shel, the only thing to put on a matzo meal pancake (or matzo brei, for that matter) is strawberry preserves! That screams "Passover!!" to me. :D

Shroom, we had The Magic Crepe restaurants in the Chicago area for a time in the 70s. I don't know when they left, but I thought they were exotic and loved going there when I visited friends during college. They had dessert crepes, but I don't think they had dessert omelets.
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post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Nobody ever told me that strawberry preserves were traditional, it was just what I liked. This is the first time I heard about the tradition ... Started making the pancakes when I was six or seven years old. I sure loved 'em - can still taste them and feel the texture. I made mine pretty heavy. Might be something to try again.

Don't recall ever putting preserves on the matzoh brie . don't even recall if I put anything on it other than salt and pepper - lots of pepper.

I have a feeling there may be some matzoh-oriented breakfasts coming up soon.

shel
post #8 of 13
Many years ago I was a chef at a fancy bed and breakfast. I used to make an omelete that required that you seperate the egg whites/yellow and whip them both seperately, then fold them together again. Add sugar then cook like a "regular" omelette, stuff with sweetened cream cheese and berries etc...

I hated making that dish and I thought the smell of sweet eggs frying was disgusting but, it was one of the more popular dishes that I served. Go figure.
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post #9 of 13
Hi Jon!

I love the flavor of blueberries, BUT in lots of dishes they take on an unappealing grayish hue. Let me know how they do in the omelet. I'm sure I would love that!
post #10 of 13
BretonBeats
I remember many bistros in the UK used to make those 'souffle' omelettes as a pudding.

I never liked the results!
post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
RE: BretonBeats and Ishbel's comments

Just to be clear, the omelet I made wasn't anything fancy like those you've described. I made a simple, plain three-egg omelet, added a few blueberries and a few bits of cream cheese, folded it over, let warm a moment, and then on to a warm platter.

I don'tthink I could tolerate eggs made the way BB describes .... they sound awful. BTW, the blueberries didn't turn any shades of grey - they remained true to their color.

shel
post #12 of 13
Breton's sweet omelette is called an "omelette souffle," and I'm pretty sure they go back before Careme.

Shel -- how do you like that carbon steel omelette pan? Nice having the right tool for the job, eh?

BDL
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
I love it! IMO, there's no better pan for making scrambled eggs and omelets.

shel
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