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A little something extra for a white chocolate cheesecake?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I'm using up the last of my El Rey Icoa to make a white chocolate cheesecake. I'm going to top it with a glaze made from Gran Saman and use chocolate wafers for the crust.

All in all, a pretty basic cheesecake. I'd like to add just a bit of something to enhance the white and dark chocolate flavors. I'm wondering what y'all think of a bit of grand mariner or framboise to the white chocolate base? Or do you have any other suggestions?

thanks muchly,

beth
post #2 of 11
I'm not a pro so you'll probably disregard this, but . . I prefer Cointreau to Grand Marnier for flavoring desserts.
post #3 of 11
The el Rey Icoa is so wonderful and subtle with such a rich cocoa buttery taste, I'd be afraid that adding such strong flavors would make that flavor almost disappear.
My suggestion would be to use a good quality Creme de Cacao or vanilla pod and then just let the chocolate do its magic.

You might also want to sprinkle a few chopped cocoa nibs over the top.

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post #4 of 11
Have you thought about adding a little heat to it? I know it's not tradition but i like using things that are just a little out of the norm. Grandma and white chocolate are classic. But who says you can't add your own flair? Add a subtle heat , it helps to highten peoples curiosity?

And if your not into the heat factor....I really like candied rinds? they add texture color and flavor. Depends on what your looking for.
post #5 of 11

what about mixing a few

raspberries and roasted slivered almonds through it, gives it a bit more texture, a little tartness and crunch

or for something totally different peanut butter and white chocolate work very well together
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

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when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
So much for good intentions but sad to say that the white chocolate cheesecake fell by the wayside. Got a "request" yesterday morning to bring a red velvet cake with white chocolate buttercream frosting to sunday dinner.

So now I'm thinking of doing a cherry chocolate cheesecake in its place. Still use chocolate wafer crumb base, but use up some dried sour cherries I have by soaking them in creme de coaco and doing the chocolate glaze on top.

Ok, out of curiousity, what ingredients would add warmth or heat? I'm aware of using pepper, ginger and chilies but what else?
post #7 of 11

what about a little whiskey or brandy

ya dont need much
or a little wasabi, either powder or paste, some crushed lemon grass,
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
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when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #8 of 11
No wasabi, no horseradishy thing at all with chocolate. Might as well learn from my stupid mistakes :crazy: instead of repeating them.

The booze suggestion was good, but not whiskey (bourbon or sour mash) or whisky (Scotch or Irish).

Rum, would probably be best. Stroh 80 is the real baker's first choice, but it's become fantastically expensive. Captain Morgan makes a nice substitute. Both of these have cinnamon -- which is the only heat I'd choose for cherries and chocolate. In this cake :p, I'd go with Captain Morgan

There are some wonderfully inexpensive Cognacs suitable for baking, like Raynal (sold at Trader Joe's). It might not drink like a 75 year old Hennessey, but it sure cooks like one. ;)

Suitable liqueurs might include one of the cherries like Cheri Suisse, Cherry Heering, Cherry Kirsch, creme de griotte; regular old Kirschwasser, creme de cassis; or, any of the chocolate liqueurs.

I like your idea of Grand Marnier or Cointreau for taste, but IMO, they've become too expensive for baking, especially since a good triple-sec such as Bols or a good curacao bake exactly like Cointreau, as long as you adjust the sugar slightly -- or with the addition of some inexpensive Cognac, as well as Grand Marnier. :chef: Don't forget to add a little orange zest along with your inexpensive substitute.

Amaretto would go well with cherries, I think.

Luck,
BDL
post #9 of 11
B D L

I'll take your advice on using something other than Cointreau for cooking . . . that's expensive stuff. Thx for the tip.
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Soaking dried cherries in creme de cocoa was a good and bad idea. The cherries turned out with a slimy texture and an anemic color; but, the resulting liquid was tasty - a chocolate with mild cherry overtones and a light pink color. Think I'll search for a good quality canned sweet dark cherry and try a puree swirl with flavor or do a layered thing. I'm thinking of chocolate covered cherries, the kind with the flavored fondant centers.

I usually use Harlequin when recipes call for an orange liqueur. It's sweeter than the others, but I just adjust the sweetener in the recipe. But I inquired about grand marnier because I had a bit left from making truffles this past christmas.

I'll need to look into the capt morgan. Been using myers dark because that's what I have on hand. I've seen capt. morgan at my state run liquour store. As to the other suggestions, that'll have to be saved for my bi-monthly road trip to the "big" city. The local ABC has a very limited selection. I can't get tia maria and when I inquired about spanish brandy, you'd thunk I had sprouted a second head right before their eyes from the look they gave me. :)
post #11 of 11

other flavor profiles

frangelico creme fraiche topping with crushed hazelnut or glazed spiced hazelnuts (salt sugar and pepper) rimming the edge or make a hazelnut bark and use to decorate and accent flavors

kaluha - to marry with the mexican flavors
could make a kaluha white chocolate mousse topping or if you don't want to use the liquor then use instant espresso to flavor whipped cream

chile and cinnamon with some red sichuan peppers?
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