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Can anyone guess what I'm making?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
post #2 of 19
'Bread In A Can'. Genius! You'll make millions, Randy. :lol:
Gotta love the bacon!
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Gotta love the bacon!
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post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
anyone...?

post #4 of 19
Thread Starter 
Awesome! you are correct! now email me your address and bank account number so I can send you 1 free "pet rock" :lol:
post #5 of 19
Are you practising your babka making skills or are you hoping it keeps till the weekend? :look:
Gotta love the bacon!
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Gotta love the bacon!
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post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
na, they don't need to keep (although they SHOULD be ok until this weekend, If I wanted), i just give them to family to around this time and play easter bunny tomorrow.....

The Babka I get for easter dinner comes from the European provisions store around the corner, I don't think all the practice in the world, can make mine as good as theirs!
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
actually, they came out pretty good. I generally don't love the taste, but these came out not too bad.

still not as good as the polish store's...




post #8 of 19
my mom used to make babka in cans....
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #9 of 19
Babka? I'm not familiar with this. Is it just a bread with icing? Is it a good easter dessert?
It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
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It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
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post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
I'm just really learning how to cook, so I don't know "technically" what is a cake or what is a bread....but If I had to say anything I'd say its a cross between the two. not as good as cake but way better than bread.

from wikipedia, for the eastern european version....I'm belarus, but for some reason "this" is the version thats been family tradition, not the typical belarus one....maybe because it's a polish neighborhood?

It is a spongy yeast cake that is traditionally baked for Easter Sunday. Darra Goldstein, professor of Russian at Williams College says "babka comes from baba, a very tall, delicate yet rich yeast-risen cake eaten in Western Russia and Eastern Poland."[1] Traditional babka has some type of fruit filling, especially raisins, and is glazed with a fruit-flavored icing, sometimes with rum added. Modern babka may be chocolate or have a cheese filling.
post #11 of 19
I'm impressed. Your bread looks really good

Trying to fathom an everyday use for them. Never heard of Babka. Is it a polish tradition. We've had a huge polish hype recently in Scotland as so many are living here now. The supermarkets have even developed a polish section. I would like to cater for them???
No idea where to start for a Polish buffet
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #12 of 19
Thread Starter 
I think it's mainly an easter thing for this version (the polish/ukranian/belarus) as thats the only time the polish market even carries them.


No idea where to start?
Bigos
Sauerkraut and Kielbasi
Glumpkis/Golabki
Pierogis


here is a good list
Polish Food: traditional food from Poland

we have I think 3 polish restaurants now in my 1 square mile of a town now, aside from the 3 separate polish markets. My town is an interesting mix, 1/3rd polish/belarus/ukranian, 1/3rd Portuguese (2 great restaurants in town, and a few markets) and 1/3rd Mexican (only 1 restaurant, but hey....they know when their food has been outdone by the polls!)
post #13 of 19
I was under the impression that babka was a Jewish favourite in Eastern Europe. Obviously not exclusively if it's an Easter pud.
Loving your photo's Randy (do you mind being called that? :look:). Love the ones on your blogsite too. For a 'non-chef' your presentation puts a few that I know to shame. Makes me feel REALLY hungry as well. :lips::D
Gotta love the bacon!
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Gotta love the bacon!
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post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 
Sure you can call me randy, although the name is a play on a movie character....not my real name ;)

thanks for the compliments.

Babka, has a few different links...and 1 is certainly jewish. there are a few different versions, and ways....the "tall" way that I did, is the more russian/ukranian/polish way.

Babka - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
post #15 of 19
I am wayyyyyyyy late in this, but am curious.....I have an old family recipe for Coffee Can Batter Bread, recipe as follows:
2 ½ to 3 cups all purpose flour
1 T sugar
1 T finely chopped onion (optional)
1 T dillweed (optional)
1 T salt
¼ tsp baking soda
1 pgk active yeast
1 cup creamed cottage cheese
¼ c water
1 T butter
1 egg
1 egg, slightly beaten I have never made it because it sounds disgusting......is it at all related to what you made? This recipe has been in my family for generations. It may have come over on an ancestral ship for all I know lol.
post #16 of 19
Bread in a can! Genius!!! :lips:
"Never use water unless you have to! I'm going to use vermouth!" ~Julia Child

"No chaos, no creation. Evidence: the kitchen at mealtime. "
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"Never use water unless you have to! I'm going to use vermouth!" ~Julia Child

"No chaos, no creation. Evidence: the kitchen at mealtime. "
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post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 
WAAAY late on that joke there sunshine :)
post #18 of 19
My grandma (Danish) made all her sweet breads in cans. Don't think she knew what a loaf pan was. The weirdest one had chopped candy orange slices in it. Don't know if they even make those any more, but they were basically a gum drop in the shape of an orange slice. She also loved dates. Going through her recipe box, I thought if I had a buck for every recipe in there that had dates in it, I'd never have to work again. The picture reminds me of bucket bread. That was my first thought when I saw it. Don't remenmber how to make it, but I think it's a sourdough type bread that you bake in a bucket.
post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
I used this recipe from All Recipes, as it was the closest to what I wanted, but there are a few different "versions" of babka. I brought a few recipes to the local European provisions market, and the lady was kind enough to help me out.
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 1/2 (.25 ounce) packages active dry yeast
  • 3 teaspoons white sugar
  • 1/2 cup warm water (110 degrees F/45 degrees C)
  • 2 eggs
  • 10 egg yolks
  • 3/4 cup butter, melted
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 2 teaspoons lemon zest
  • 5 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup raisins
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoons water
  1. Warm the milk in a small saucepan until it bubbles, then remove from heat. Place 1/3 cup flour in a large bowl and pour milk over flour. Beat until smooth. Let cool until lukewarm. In a small bowl, dissolve yeast and sugar in warm water. Pour into cooled milk and beat well. Let rise in a warm place until bubbly.
  2. Stir 2 eggs, egg yolks, butter, vanilla and lemon rind into milk/yeast mixture. Mix in flour, 1 cup at a time, beating well after each addition. When a loose dough has formed, turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead until smooth, about 10 minutes. Gently knead in raisins.
  3. Lightly oil a large bowl, place the dough in the bowl and turn to coat with oil. Cover with a damp cloth and let rise in a warm place until doubled in volume, about 45 minutes. Deflate the dough and let rise again until doubled in volume, about 30 minutes.
  4. Deflate the dough and turn it out onto a lightly floured surface. Divide the dough into three equal pieces and form into round loaves. Place the loaves into well buttered tall, round baking pans. Do not fill the pans more than 1/3 full. Cover the loaves with a damp cloth and let rise until tripled in volume, about 40 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).
  5. In a small bowl, beat egg with 2 tablespoons water. Lightly brush this mixture onto the risen loaves. Bake in preheated oven 10 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C) and bake for 30 minutes more. Reduce oven temperature to 275 degrees F (135 degrees C) and bake for another 15 to 20 minutes, until golden brown.
  6. Let loaves stand 5 to 10 minutes before removing from pans. Transfer loaves very gently onto a cloth covered pillow (never a hard surface as this may cause the babka to settle or fall). Change position of loaves during cooling period.
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