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post #61 of 304
good luck with the job Oregon
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
post #62 of 304
Thread Starter 
Thanks, Tessa :roll:
post #63 of 304
we went to Darjeeling when we went to india, it was so cool having some darjeeling chai on the road side of a tea plantation with the 3rd highest mountain in India looking over us
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
post #64 of 304
In India , tea is served that way every where but they boil it all together in a pot it takes a bit of getting used to especially i found it a bit too sweet as i drink my tea with milk no sugar
if we were out somewhere and i wanted tea to drink i would have to ask for black tea with milk , they would bring the tea and a jug of boiling hot milk (no pasturisation) it made the tea taste quite strange. im sure i also had buffalo milk and yak milk at sometime as well
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
post #65 of 304
The buffalo milk sounds delicious. I would love to go to India for the scenery and the tea. Before I settle down, I'm planning on going to Japan, China, and Thailand, just for the culinary part of it. I may put India in there somewhere.

I'm so excited. It's raining over here. We have been in a drought for about 3 months. It even dropped below 90 degrees today.
It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
post #66 of 304
Thread Starter 
You got it exactly, of course. :roll:

People in India think of tea as a sweet, it seems. It is a bit too sweet for me. They don't eat or drink sweet things often, and tea is one of those few times.

I'm sure I had some non-cow milk, but I don't think I have tried yak. I should go back just for that.
post #67 of 304
Thread Starter 
If I really get serious about yak-milk tea, I should go to Tibet. They use yak butter and salt too.
post #68 of 304
they do eat lots of sweets there , they even have a festival called Diwali where at the end sweets are given as gifts and eaten by everybody and loads of salty snacks as well , their sweets are very sweet compared to european tastes.
when we were travelling they had chai whallers , snack whallers, soup whallers working the trains and busses and selling their goodies. Whallers are merchants, it made for interesting and noisy journeys ... great fun
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
post #69 of 304
Thread Starter 
I've been to India too--born there in fact :^)

Most people can't afford much sweet stuff.
post #70 of 304
it was like every where we went there were sweet stalls and lots of housewives buying
and on the trains, mind you i think it was a different class of buyers, those that can afford the trains and stuff

where were you born and did you move around and live in different places oregon
this was my first time there , Bruce has been there 3 times now
we went down the east coast, delhi,amrhitsa,back to delhi, mathura, agra, varanasi, kolkutta, darjeeling, bhubaneswa, vijiwada , chennai
just an incredible country , and i so would love to go back
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
post #71 of 304
Thread Starter 
I was born in Gauhati, Assam--now called Guwahati. Spent most of my early years in Assam state.

I went to boarding school in the Himalayas.

I've also lived in Hyderabad, in south India. Thirteen of my first 16 years were in India, but there is so much to explore, so much regional culture and cuisine, that I can't claim to have seen a tenth of it.
post #72 of 304
wow what an intersting childhood
coming stateside must have been a bit of a culture shock
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
post #73 of 304
Thread Starter 
Yeah it was :D But I wouldn't exactly fit in there (India) now, either.
post #74 of 304
What shocked you most about the USA? I waiter friend of mine is from China and said the most surprising thing was how different everyone looked. Like hair and skin color.
It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
post #75 of 304
Thread Starter 
Hair and skin color didn't faze me at all since my parents are white, I'm white and I went to an international school with kids from all over the world.

What struck me was how mean kids were (I was in 12th grade), how much was wasted (food and all, disposable everything), how much meat people ate, and how dependent people were on cars. I also loved all the Italian food in New Jersey, and air conditioning. Those were my thoughts at the time, and if I went back to India now I'm sure I would have culture shock again.

Now I depend on my car as much as the next person here:crazy:
post #76 of 304
when i was in india i attracted a lot of attention, especially with kiddies, im short , blonde, round and very freindly i looked very different to what they were used to , especially in some of the places where there didnt seem to be a big tourist industry. I had so many families and other people want to have their photos with me , and i held so many beautiful indian babies , who were fascinated by my hair and the colour of my skin, it was quite endearing really.
For me some of the biggest culture shocks when i went there were things like the poverty and the dreadful amounts of plastic rubbish everywhere, its made me much more greener (not that im a card carrying scary greeny) back home and seeing all the cows roaming around the streets was really interesting.
I just loved India and cant wait to go back
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
post #77 of 304
Thread Starter 
When I was growing up in India, in the 60's and 70's, foreigners were rare there. Foreigners rarely visited my home state of Assam, and there were only a few American missionary families in the whole state. We were used to getting stared at a lot, but it wasn't as uncomfortable as it might sound.

Those people staring at us usually were really happy to have a conversation. They were not only fascinated, but very friendly as well.

Once I went bicycle riding through town, and when I got back home I had lost my wallet. I was just a kid but had more money on me than ever, about $5, which goes a long way in India. I considered my money gone forever. The next day I rode through town again and a shopkeeper yelled to me "hey, come here". He gave me my wallet and all the money, which was probably a day's earnings for him.

In big cities people may not be as good natured, I don't know. But I loved where I grew up.
post #78 of 304
im so cold , i really hate winter wish it were summer
couldnt be bothered cooking dinner tonight, so had some mac n cheese which was from a pack and and tasted gross,
oh well im sure the cats will eat it
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
post #79 of 304
All of the Chinese people at my work are in love with my hair, it's a light brown with natural highlights and very soft thanks to expensive conditioners. They like to brush it and pet it, I don't mind though, it feels great.

It's summer here, and a hot one. We've been in a drought with water rationing for about 2 months. We can still shower whenever we need to, but we can only water our lawns Wednesdays and Saturdays. We've been up in the 100's too but it looks like rain today, hopefully it will give in.
It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
post #80 of 304
Thread Starter 
Check this out, major brawn. This dog has a genetic defect. This is from Popular Science magazine.

post #81 of 304
oooohhh thats just ugly, its like the Arnold Swarzenegger of the dog world:eek:
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
post #82 of 304
Thread Starter 
Is there a term for how onions are usually cut in India . . . well I guess I should say in my experience in India. They are intentionally not sliced to an even thickness. They are sliced so that they are thin down to nothing at the ends, and thicker in the middle. That way, when they are fried there is both a carmelized part and a softer part. Many Indian dishes need both these onion flavors. I just thought of it now because I am cooking onions that way.
post #83 of 304
Thread Starter 
I guess there isn't a term for that kind of onion slicing, oh well.
post #84 of 304
Thread Starter 
Dear Walter: I hope you can help me here. The other day I set off for
work leaving my husband in the house watching the TV as usual. I hadn't
gone more than a mile down the road when my engine conked out and the
car shuddered to a halt. I walked back home to get my husband's help.

When I got home I couldn't believe my eyes. He was in our bedroom with
the neighbor lady. I am 32, my husband is 34, and we have been married
for twelve years. When I confronted him, he admitted that they had been
having an affair for the past six months. I told him to stop or I would
leave him. He was let go from his job six months ago, and he says he has
been feeling increasingly depressed and worthless. I love him very
much, but ever since I gave him the ultimatum he has become increasingly
distant. He won't go to counseling and I'm afraid I can't get through to
him anymore. Can you please help?

Sincerely,
Distraught in North Carolina


Dear Distraught: A car stalling after being driven a short distance can
be caused by a variety of faults with the engine. Start by checking that
there is no debris in the fuel line. If it is clear, check the vacuum
pipes and hoses on the intake manifold and also check all grounding
wires. If none of these approaches solves the problem, it could be that
the fuel pump itself is faulty, causing low delivery pressure to the
carburetor float chamber.

I hope this helps.

Walter
post #85 of 304
This goes for me in the morning

post #86 of 304
That's hilarious. I laughed for a good 20 minutes. Thanks!
It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
post #87 of 304
Thread Starter 
I visited France in 2000. My sister (who goes by "anondi" here) and my brother-in-law lived in a small town near Perigeux. I had a fantastic time.

Arriving in Bordeaux, I had brought some northwest (USA) microbrews for them, and I wasn't sure if I was supposed to claim them at customs. I think I was the only one on the whole plane who stopped at customs, and the officers there had an attitude like "Why are you bothering us?" :lol:

People there smoked right under no-smoking signs in the airport, so I followed suit.

My one big supermarket trip, getting stuff to bring back the the US, was great. When I went to pay for my stuff the lines were long. The store's computer system had gone down and they were estimating prices and adding things up with calculators. When they asked me about prices, I had no idea for most things, since I wasn't used to Francs and hadn't paid attention. They guessed everything low, giving me the benefit of the doubt. I had picked some Bushmills Black whisky for my brother-in-law's birthday present, and got it for about half price--that price I did remember. I got some French Nestle pistachio praline-filled chocolate bars, and they were fantastic :crazy:

I found out that all the big deal about French food and wines was true. The beer there was great, though the selection of types was limited compared to here (which is why my hosts requested some from here).

I'd love to go back some time.
post #88 of 304
God appreciates a good work ethic.

2 Thes 3:10 "For even when we were with you, we commanded you this: If anyone will not work, neither shall he eat."

At the same time, we are also commanded to help those who have fallen on hard times, through no fault of their own. Notice that the above verse says will not work, not cannot work.
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
post #89 of 304
Thread Starter 
I had lunch Tuesday at a place in the middle of nowhere. It was a beautiful part of central Oregon.

They had an espresso menu with "Camel Latte". They left an "R" out. I was tempted to ask the server/cashier about it, but let it go. I wanted to know what the camel flavor was made from.
post #90 of 304
Thread Starter 
I had a digital camera and wanted to take a pic, but these people were nice and I didn't want to be rude.
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