ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › I have a ribeye...what to do with it other than the norm...
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

I have a ribeye...what to do with it other than the norm...

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Kind of burnt out on just steak cooked the best way, salt pepper, on the grill medium rare.

Looking for another way to prepare a ribeye that I have other than just simply grilling it with a sauce if you know what I mean.

Any ideas?

thanks!
post #2 of 25
We do a smoked pepper with our ribeye.

Equal parts of salt, smoked pepper, paprika, brown sugar. Throw it on the grill or pan-sear it.

While it is not drastically different, the smoked pepper and caramalized sugar definitely adds some "punch" to the finished dish.
post #3 of 25
Stir fry with rice or noodles? Teriyaki steak?
post #4 of 25
You could braise it?

Im thinking maybe...

Beef broth/stock, carrots, potatoes, onion, garlic cloves, salt, pepper, maybe some cumin and oregano?

Somethin different.

Really, i love ribeye steak, so in my opinion, any way u cook it u cant go wrong. Just dont through it in a deep fryer! lol.
post #5 of 25
It's a carnal sin to braise rib steak. Pan roast it (them). Use the fond to make a cognac/ cream/ green-peppercorn pan-reduction. IIRC, you've asked about the techniques a couple of times. Time to man-up and try it.

BDL
post #6 of 25
Hong Kong style. Done in a wok. Make an orange sauce as you would for duck. Slice and pour sauce on top.
post #7 of 25
Jerked ribeye with a salsa
post #8 of 25
Surf and Turf. Blackened. With Crayfish veloute of some kind. :D
post #9 of 25
Thread Starter 
Hmmm maybe I'll do it three-ways. Carpaccio over spinach with balsamic, some olive oil and some cheese.

then I'll do it as suggested
"cognac/ cream/ green-peppercorn pan-reduction"

then maybe a surf and turf (although with shrimp due to availability)

any further ideas for sides, etc?

also, board, I am not sure I asked about a cognac reduction can you give me some tips?

it's a HUGE steak, like 18oz. and that's way too much for even my girlfriend and I (today, after a big brunch!)


keep in mind I haven't been cooking long (you can check out my blog for my "skills") but I'm willing to take on anything, but I guess I can't eff up carpaccio. I've never made before, but I'd figure I'd cut a nice little peice, pound it, freeze it for 2 hours or so, then slice it really thin against the grain? should I marinade it? season it before freezing? after?
post #10 of 25
Oh cummon you can do it!

Crack some peppercorns with the bottom of a pan first. Now, after searing the ribeye, defat the pan and deglaze it with cognac. Add the peppercorns. If you have demiglace, now's the time to add some. Finish with a little bit of cream.
post #11 of 25
Thread Starter 
Thanks, I'll definitly do it! although I don't have a demiglace...necessary? worth grabbing a cheapo ready-mix type deal from shop rite or best to just leave it out?

any suggestions for sides/ veggies/ etc.

also interested in the surf and turf idea...any suggestions for something with something other than crayfish?

Love this site!
post #12 of 25
Randall,

Send me your email address via mine (mancooks@gmail.com) or by message, and I'll send you a pdf with very complete instructions.

You'd be doing me a favor by using it and giving me feedback, as it's a "core recipe" from the book I'm working on -- in that it's more a tutorial in technique(s) than a recipe. The book is meant for people exactly like you -- not expert yet, but plenty of desire and enthusiasm.

Boar
post #13 of 25
For the 'surf and turf' you could try almost an oscar. Grill, broil, pan roast the steak, or whatever. Lay some crab meat over it, a couple stalks of steamed asparagus and top the mound with Bearnaise sauce. The powdered mix from the market can be just fine, as making real Bearnaise from scratch can be a bit intimidating for folks with limited experience.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #14 of 25
Thread Starter 
girlfriend kind of likes the Oscar idea, and heck, with the help of juilia childs and a few hours to kill trying, I think i can get something that i might be able to call a Bearnaise! I'll have to ponder this one over for a little while before i hit up the grocery store.
post #15 of 25
Go for it! If done right, you end up with velvety smooth, rich decadence. If the bearnaise sauce breaks, you end up with greasy scrambled eggs - very tasty eggs, though, I might add!

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #16 of 25
Thread Starter 
went with Boar's suggestion and kept it simple (no worries, I still have 2 steaks in the freezer!)





post #17 of 25
Nice! What's the sauce and what's the wine?
post #18 of 25
Thread Starter 
not sure what you would call it, but it's what boar suggested, took the pan juice, added some cognac and some crushed peppercorns then some cream and reduced.

wine is nothing special, a simple Blackstone Merlot (kind of my "house" wine as I always have it in stock)
post #19 of 25
Yuck, that beef looks burnt to a crisp!!

Okay, maybe I prefer mine a bit more on the rare side. Minor nits aside, looks good. This discussion, coupled with my wife having other plans for dinner led me to consider a personal indulgence, fixing a nice ribeye for myself with bearnaise. I haven't made any for a bit, need to keep in practice, you know.

Dinner turned out to be a rump roast with a red wine, leek and garlic reduction. I'm so embarassed, since I'm probably the only person on the planet who has ever walked into a store with a clear and definite purpose, only to walk out with something completely different. Sigh.

So it goes.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #20 of 25
My apologies. I assumed the humor in my comment would be obvious.

But speaking of burnt to a crisp, see those little black bits around the fat on the right side of the picture? I bet those were some tasty tidbits, like burnt ends from a well-smoked brisket.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
Reply
post #21 of 25
Sorry for getting too serious.

Hey don't forget about the off-topic thread :)
post #22 of 25
Thread Starter 
haha, no worries. maybe it's just the pictures not showing the color, its medium, even a little less actually. I pulled it at 130/135.

You know how I know? screw the fancy thermometers or press tests or what not..........if it wasn't medium/medium rare, the girlfriend wouldnt eat it! no surer test than that haha. :lol:

and the burnt stuff is the good stuff! and how dare you leave all that fat on the plate!

haha.

this was my first time doing a steak in a pan, then in the oven, and not on a grill, i can say that I might (i know blasphemy) like it better......
post #23 of 25
It's the crispy bits of burnt fat that make it all worthwhile. :D
post #24 of 25
I like Kuan's mentality.

How about semi freezing and slicing super thin, raw, into a hot broth?

Sort of a Vietnamese pho (very delicious).
post #25 of 25
Rib is the wrong cut for tai (the raw meat that is served alongside of Pho, only rookies forget and get it served in the broth). Too much fat in the meat, it's too rich. If you want to go up-market sirloin would be best.

Rib works well for shabu shabu though. You'd definitely need a slicer. But if you're going to freeze-slice, why not a Philly cheese steak?

BTW, the sauce RPM made is a "Mild Green Peppercorn Pan Reduction." I sent him a recipe teaching: Searing, pan-roasting (aka pan-broiling), deglazing, and how to make a cream finished pan reduction. The techniques were more important than any of the specific ingredients. He's officially ready to riff.

More BTW: I forgot the shallots? Oy. If you're using shallots in a pan reduction, they are usually minced very fine, and go in the pan immediately before or immediately after the first liquid (the booze) to hit the pan. You want them to "practice their love" (as the President said) by leaving it on the bottom of the pan, where the rest of the sauce can pick it up.

BDL
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › I have a ribeye...what to do with it other than the norm...