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substitute for gelatin? - Page 2

post #31 of 43

Hi everyone,

So in my attempt to catch up with the class that i missed of school today as an apprentice chef 2nd year. I stumbled across this page looking for the coversion rate of gelatine to agar agar to make the practical test dish that i missed out on seeing and making today in prac class. So was wondering if one of you wonderful chefs would help me out...
We all know what school is like and well i just didn't make it out of bed this morning at a before the bird even catches the worm time of 5:30 am when u went to sleep at 1:30 am...
Anyways so the dish is....

Coconut Bavarois

Never made it before and for religious reason i can't make stuff from gelatine at home and the test is next week so i need to make it on my day off this week. Oh and work is way to busy and probably wouldn't have all the ingredients anyways.

 

So if ya can help me out i would be ever so greatful...

Humble lil apprentice!

 

P.s: one more thing, my family is vegetarian and when looking at a tub of cream i read that it contains gelatine, is t the same type of gelatine as the gelatine used in making jelly and stuff or is it a natural gelatine found in the fat in milk? Stupid question? I feel really dumb right now! confused.gif

post #32 of 43

If it says gelatin then I would assume it is animal based.

Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is Too Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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Never! Live To Work!:::::::Work To Live!::Life Is Too Short!!
Paninicakes.com

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post #33 of 43

For all the vegetarians and relegious members and guest. . Go to the supermarket and buy a product called KO-JEL  It is certified Kosher by the Union of Orthodox Rabbis ( OU)  and is Kosher Parve. This company makes a whole line of kosher desserts and ingredients.

I have never seen gelatin as an inert ingredient in heavy cream, pectin yes on rare occassions. In most cases you could call gelatin a natural by product ., as it is extracted from bones pectin from seaweed..


Edited by chefedb - 3/10/11 at 3:07am

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #34 of 43

Still would like to know the conversion rate of gelatine to agar agar?

I need to make Coconut Bavarois at home and for religious reason can't use gelatine in the house. But i do have agar agar, so any tipe would be great!

Thanx

post #35 of 43
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #36 of 43

Oui Chef

Great... Fantasic!!!
I think i can do this... Well learning includes failing so i will try it out and let you all know how i go... Monday is D - day so keep ur fingers crossed i don't mess it up!

post #37 of 43

ARGH
Ok... here sits a frustrated apprentice!

I tried making my coconut bavarois with agar agar and it turned my bavarois GREEN!

If any1 can tell me how to make coconut bavarois with agar agar and have it turn out white pleaseeeeeeeeeeeeeee let me know.
Also i tried to make a jelly with agar agar and it didn't set... Help?!?!?!?

post #38 of 43

Agar will not work. Get Ko jell like I said above. Pectin will work and will even gel outside refrigerator.. Buy a brand called CERTO

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #39 of 43

can i use agar-agar as a subtitute for gelatine in order to make marshmallow?? 

 

post #40 of 43

I'm afraid agar will not work for marshmallow. Agar sets at a much higher temperature than gelatin, and it has a very brittle and hard texture rather than tender and elastic when set.

 

And if you're using a non-egg white recipe, the gelatin also acts as a whipping agent by adding protein. Agar has no protein so the mixture would turn out dense and hard.

post #41 of 43

Good (Evening AngryChef:

 

Have you considered using flax seed gelatin? It's very easy to make, has the consistency and mouthfeel of raw egg white, and is omega-3 heavy stuff.

 

Simply add 2 tablespoons of flax seeds to 2 cups of water, and boil for 10 minutes. This will make the equivalent of 2 eggs. Strain through a fabric - not cheesecloth - into a jar, dash in 2 shakes of salt and into the refrigerator if you have any left. You may be able to boil off the seeds for a second time for more gel, frankly, after the first boil, I prefer to use the seeds in ginger muffins.

 

Flax seed gel is vegan, and if you have any left over you can either squirt a little alcohol in it (1/4 the volume of gel) for the best darned hand sanitizer, or use it for lotion after a shower. Also makes fantastic hair gel. I'm not sure about the caloric properties, but it's thirsty stuff, so add 1/4 cup of water or milk to the recipe for each 'egg-worth', or serve the item with lots of fruit or vegetables.   

post #42 of 43

I have Celiacs and also avoid MSG in products but only if the MSG is made from gluten products.  Did u ask your doctor if that is what they meant for u to avoid, also.  I can use arrowroot in my cooking and have no reactions,  Arrowroot is a root and not considered a grain,  it is used in paleo cooking and baking.  I use it in bread recipes instead of the gelatin and have good results.

post #43 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by angrychef View Post

A client is requesting my pastries but wants no gelatin in any of the items( I think she has an aversion to where it's derived from). What could I use as a substitute for gelatin? Pectin? And how much would I have to use for mousses and such? Many thanks for the help!

These substitute might help you:

 

1. Agar- Agar - flavorless gelling agent, derived from cooked and pressed seaweed, is available flaked, powdered, or in bars. Grind the agar-agar in a coffee grinder or food processor and then cook it, stirring it regularly until it dissolves. When used in a recipe, agar-agar sets in about an hour and doesn’t require refrigeration to gel.

 

2. Carrageen which is known as Irish moss, this seaweed, found in coastal waters near Ireland, France, and North America, is best when used for making softer gels and puddings. To prepare carrageen, rinse it thoroughly, and then soak it in water until it swells. Add the carrageen to the liquid you want to set, boil for 10 minutes, and remove the carrageen. One ounce of carrageen will gel 1 cup of liquid.

 

3. Kosher Gelatin - many kosher gelatins are vegan. Try Lieber’s unflavored gel, Carmel’s unsweetened gel, KoJel’s unflavored gel, and Hain Superfruits.

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