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What makes a fish sushi grade or sashimi grade? - Page 2

post #31 of 45

Reminds me of the use of the word Angus beef or Authentic Black .Angus.  MERELY A SELLING PLOY. . WE RAN TEST ON SOME OF IT AS OPPOSED TO CHOICE MEAT, COULD NOT DETECT ANY DIFFERENCES  EXCEPT PRICE.. It is a term used under license that you pay for in many ways.. Like Sushi Grade fish. The local health departments.. learned from the USDA re freezing fish. The cruise industry has been doing this for years, in fact freezing must be a minimum of 72 hours to insure death of all parasites.. That's the Law there are no exempt on cruise ships.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #32 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by abefroman View Post

What makes a fish sushi grade or sashimi grade?
In order for s
Quote:
Originally Posted by abefroman View Post

What makes a fish sushi grade or sashimi grade?
in order for the fish to be considered 'sushi or sashimi grade' the fish has to be frozen for a certain length of time below -45. This effectively kills of any parasites that may be present in the fish.
post #33 of 45
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #34 of 45
Sashimi is simply the freshest fish you can get cut into thin strips.
post #35 of 45

Hype! Since there is no such legit term as sushi grade. In fact the USDA is trying to push a program that all fish be frozen for health purposes. This is to kill parasites that heat does not kill. Its already SOP on cruise ships and some rest chains.

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post #36 of 45

Well, that answers my question!! Wish I had found this site earlier on in my career!  Tons of great information and experience available.peace.gif

post #37 of 45

Hi Sushi Lovers

 

If you live in the UK or Europe I highly recommend Kazari.co.uk.

 

They sell a wide selection "sushi / sashimi grade fish" which I'd truly vouch for.

 

:)

post #38 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by ED BUCHANAN View Post

Hype! Since there is no such legit term as sushi grade. In fact the USDA is trying to push a program that all fish be frozen for health purposes. This is to kill parasites that heat does not kill. Its already SOP on cruise ships and some rest chains.

 

Does the freezing have to be a high speed (flash) freeze, or simply sufficiently cold?  i.e. can I freeze salmon in my -20 F chest freezer and eat it without worrying about parasites?

post #39 of 45

Hi peeps I've worked as a manager of a Japanese themes branded restaurant. I can tell you categorically there is no such thing as Sushi grade fish or Sashimi grade fish. 

 

There's only such a thing as a trusted supplier that you know will deliver you the freshest catch of the day of ...and a Chef that knows the difference... Or ain't getting any fish ;) 

post #40 of 45
TO BE SUSHI GRADE:
Kill the fish like Joe Pesci's character kills Morrie in GOODFELLAS.... That being said, I do not recommend sushi grade Morrie

To be sushi grade the fish is bled out and killed within moments of being caught, using a tool (and process, by the same name) called Ike Jime. Many people will let their fish swim in a bucket of water or throw them alive on ice, the stress on the fish, causes lactic acid fermentation (the same thing which gives us athletic cramping), this not only lessens the shelf like of the fish, but also can give it a hint of undesirable bitterness (I've heard other fisherman describe it differently, but it is universally considered to hurt the flavor, however you describe it's' effect). What's more lactic acid is produced by consuming ATP in the muscles; a lack of ATP is what causes rigor mortis, and somehow I don't associate rigor mortise with fresh meat... In fish or humans (Wawaaa). So by bleeding the fish out ( through its brain) the fish is killed quickly, and suffering minimized, this not only causes less stress (and thereby less lactic acid), but the heart can pump for at least a few beats after brain death, pumping out blood through the brain cavity and leaving a higher percentage concentration of amino acids (which positively affects both the taste and nutrition of the fish). I know some fisherman who cut the throats of the fish, and while that may be preferable to merely allowing the fish to asphyxiated it the Ike jime method of puncturing the brain I believe to be superior because 1. It is the quickest method (thereby the most humane), leaving even less lactic acid (and more ATP) than merely cutting the throat and 2. By puncturing the brain, the excess blood is pumped out through the brain cavity, and the blood left in the body supposedly will provide a better color in the meat. I know some people who will try to stun the fish before puncturing the brain, but an untrained hand may end up merely roughing up a conscious fish before killing it, but if you know what your doing this May work well (personally I just use a knife or ice pick through the back of its head (if it's good enough for the Mafia, it's good enough for me). So to summarize a very long response to a short question TO BE SUSHI GRADE:

Kill the fish like Joe Pesci's character kills Morrie in GOODFELLAS.... That being said, I do not recommend sushi grade Morrie
post #41 of 45
post #42 of 45


Flash freeze is best(Actually in many cases done at sea by factory ships) but yes you can do at 20 but be sure fish is extremely fresh to start.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #43 of 45

Flash freeze to minus 60 does nothing but kill potential parasites and create drip loss....not to mention breaking down the tissue make it less desirable.  In 1997 the FDA made this a regulation for every fish served raw except tuna.  

post #44 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by shroomgirl View Post

hmmmm......paid alot for sashimi grade tuna and then charged alot for sashimi grade tuna. Never knew it was just plain old marketing.:p:lol:


It's not pure marketing, but it also isn't standardised in an easily quantifiable, objective manner.  The grading process is somewhat of an art, but the experts that do the grading base it on well-defined principles.  The Australian Tuna Handling Manual (https://seafood.net.au/downloads/PDF-PU033.pdf) has a pretty good description of the factors that affect the grading.

post #45 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by JustAFisherman View Post

TO BE SUSHI GRADE:
Kill the fish like Joe Pesci's character kills Morrie in GOODFELLAS.... That being said, I do not recommend sushi grade Morrie

To be sushi grade the fish is bled out and killed within moments of being caught, using a tool (and process, by the same name) called Ike Jime. Many people will let their fish swim in a bucket of water or throw them alive on ice, the stress on the fish, causes lactic acid fermentation (the same thing which gives us athletic cramping), this not only lessens the shelf like of the fish, but also can give it a hint of undesirable bitterness (I've heard other fisherman describe it differently, but it is universally considered to hurt the flavor, however you describe it's' effect). What's more lactic acid is produced by consuming ATP in the muscles; a lack of ATP is what causes rigor mortis, and somehow I don't associate rigor mortise with fresh meat... In fish or humans (Wawaaa). So by bleeding the fish out ( through its brain) the fish is killed quickly, and suffering minimized, this not only causes less stress (and thereby less lactic acid), but the heart can pump for at least a few beats after brain death, pumping out blood through the brain cavity and leaving a higher percentage concentration of amino acids (which positively affects both the taste and nutrition of the fish). I know some fisherman who cut the throats of the fish, and while that may be preferable to merely allowing the fish to asphyxiated it the Ike jime method of puncturing the brain I believe to be superior because 1. It is the quickest method (thereby the most humane), leaving even less lactic acid (and more ATP) than merely cutting the throat and 2. By puncturing the brain, the excess blood is pumped out through the brain cavity, and the blood left in the body supposedly will provide a better color in the meat. I know some people who will try to stun the fish before puncturing the brain, but an untrained hand may end up merely roughing up a conscious fish before killing it, but if you know what your doing this May work well (personally I just use a knife or ice pick through the back of its head (if it's good enough for the Mafia, it's good enough for me). So to summarize a very long response to a short question TO BE SUSHI GRADE:

Kill the fish like Joe Pesci's character kills Morrie in GOODFELLAS.... That being said, I do not recommend sushi grade Morrie


Almost.  An extra cut is made in a major blood vessel immediately after brain death (by iki jime) to bleed the fish while the heart is still pumping.  In tuna, this cut is made in the pectoral fin recess.  The entire process is comprehensively described in Onboard Handling of Sashimi-Grade Tuna - A Practical Guide for Crew Members (http://www.spc.int/Coastfish/component/content/article/44-handbooks-a-manuals/344-onboard-handling-of-sashimi-grade-tuna.html).

 

I think it is good practice to immediately spike, bleed, gut and chill all fish that you catch, although I usually defer the gutting until the end of a recreational fishing session.  A club is usually only required prior to iki jime for large fish that are either dangerous, such as Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus commerson), or violently energetic, such as tuna.  While mackerel and tuna are best spiked from the top, as described in the manual, differently shaped fish such as snapper are more easily spiked when lying on their side.  It becomes easier to locate the brain on these fish with experience, but as a guide, both the eyes and the lateral line have major nerve connections to the brain, so midway between the eye and the foremost visible part of the lateral line is generally a good starting point.  Immediately after spiking the brain, most fish are best bled below the gills.  This isn't recommended for tuna, due to the likelihood of damaging the heart, which we want to remain intact to pump the blood out, and the accessibility of the major blood vessels in their pectoral fin recesses.

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