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The Best Poo?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Now I have your attention....

I've got an area of very sandy soil which I want to make into a veg/herb garden in my yard for next spring. Was wondering if someone knows what the best way to build the soil is - manure, loam, mulch? Or a combination? I've got about 5 months of fairly cool wet weather coming, complete with frosts.

Any help/suggestions would be appreciated.
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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post #2 of 20

what about using layers

of the above mixed with layers or newspaper and wood shavings, like you would for a compost and finish off with some stuff like zoodoo ZooDoo - Home you probably can get something like we have here from your local zoo, its wonderful stuff to grow a vege garden in

with the layers you will get a nice rich garden at the end of it
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when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
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post #3 of 20
I thought this was going to be a thread about pho!:lol:
post #4 of 20
Herbs generally like lean fast draining soils. You probably don't need to amend it for Mediterranean herbs.
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
Have heard of the zoo poo, would like to use it, but we're about 200 km from nearest zoo. Might go some moo poo, and layer with mulch etc. Thanks for the tips all :)

Gonna try for a mix of parsley, chives, basil, oregano, that sort of thing - basic ones that suit lots of dishes. Looking forward to getting started, the shops charge an arm and a leg for fresh herbs. Grrr.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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post #6 of 20
Maybe there's a recipe in here!:lol::lol:


post #7 of 20

now thats funny

:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

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www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
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when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
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post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 
hehehe Thank you Oahu - but I couldn't bear to dig him into the garden :) :) :) T'would be simply unbearable
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #9 of 20
Poe is Pooh? Where can i find this book anyway?
post #10 of 20
Thread Starter 
Now this is too much - one of you wants me to dig a fictional character into my garden as fertilizer, and another wants me to dig up a real character who wrote fiction and do the same.

What is the world coming to? :crazy:
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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post #11 of 20
Rabbit poo is the very best, in my opinion. As long as it is not mixed with hay, straw, or shavings, it is a cold manure and does not need to be composted before you use it.

If you have it mixed, then do take the time to compost it. We use a 4' x 8' pit that we added earthworms to. Talk about gardening gold!

You can find rabbit breeders in your area by going to the American Rabbit Breeders Association website. Find the rabbit photos and click on a breed. It will bring up the specialty club for that breed. Most clubs have breeder listings. Most breeders have more poo than they can use, even if they are avid gardeners.
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post #12 of 20
Irrigate from a canal filled with fish!

Or give wild birds a hangout above the garden.

Cattle manure is great to mix into clayey soils, to fertilize as well as change its texture, but it takes a lot to make much difference in texture.

Calling all crapologists . . .
post #13 of 20
the hands down richest is bat guano
post #14 of 20
Since I rear a couple of cute rabbits and three hamsters, I use their poo to mix it up with the soil to make a wonderful "Poo fertilizers".

This can saving me from buying it from the fertilizer providers...:smiles:
post #15 of 20
You've probably already planted your garden by now but here goes. Cow manure will do fine but be aware it will bring weed seeds with it. Just a fact of life.

You're not going to change your soil much this year, but over the next few years, if you continue to amend your garden with manure, and any other organic matter you can find, you'll see a nice difference. Grass clippings from lawns that haven't been recently treated with chemicals, leaves, straw, and even sawdust or wood shavings, depending on the pH of your soil, will all help. Start a compost pile, too.

We, too have sandy soil. It seems to "eat" organic matter, and I've worked with this soil for nearly 20 years. Sandy soil also tends to wash fertilizers right down to China, so you have to fertilize more often. Our soil is definitely much more pleasant to work with than it used to be. Our soil is alkaline to an extreme, so I've literally tilled in truckloads of pine shavings from a local mill. Old timers here would warn me, saying, "The turpentine in them shavings will kill your plants!" What can you say? There's not turpentine but, yes, fresh shavings are usually less than desirable. Sure, it would have been nice to compost the shavings first, but my garden spot needed emergency care and the acidic shavings helped. I made sure I added extra nitrogen and all was well.

Nearly any kind of manure will help your garden spot, but don't add dog or cat manure. We have an abundance of horse and cow manure and use it liberally, despite the weed seeds it inevitably brings with it. Unfortunately, our garden is also liberally fertilized by hordes of deer. It's a continuing battle.
post #16 of 20
Thread Starter 
Hi Linda,

Haven't managed to plant yet, still too cold here, but thanks for your great advice. Yeah the sand does suck up what you put into it, I'll work hard on getting some organics in it, and look out for the weeds. I've got guinea pigs (cavies) so I might start making use of their poop too, although the straw seems to get a lot of ammonia in it from their urine. Not sure what this will do to the balance of the soil.... Maybe plant a lemon tree :)

Daina
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #17 of 20

Mushroom Manure

Mushroom Manure is brilliant stuff for the veggie gardens
Every thing I planted this year took off like it was on steriods !!!!

Lemon Grass, Chillis, Bell peppers, Grape vines, Tomatoes, Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes, Basil, Rosemary, Radishes, Lettuce, Rocket, Butternut , Cape Gooseberries, Gem Squash, Corn, Bringals, Beans, Peas mint, parsley, water melon, pumpkin, Spansek melon, courgettes, peanuts, spaghetti squash, onions, leeks, and every WEED possible on Earth it seems !!!!


as some people say they live like Mushrooms kept in the dark and fed S..t maybe there is something in it !!!:lol:
post #18 of 20
DC -

indeed, working organic matter into the soil is moving in the right direction.

the "best" solutions is 'acceptable" organic matter at the least cost - you'll need a lot of it!
and.... it'll take 2-3 years before the organics are fully broken down into a fine tilt that visibly improves the soil structure - so stick with it.
also - major soil amendments require professional soil testing - pH, NPK, etc. will shift with massive additives and you must monitor how it's going.

grass clippings - preferably from not chemically treated lawns (ie pesticide/herbicide residual issues)
leaf mulch / mold
spoiled hay / straw
pretty much all manures are great but care is needed on fresh stuff - for example horse manure is often free for the hauling but fresh horse manure tends to have high salt levels.
mushroom soil - this is a composted / used mix of horse manure & straw - excellent
chicken manure - fresh can is "too hot" - lots of ammonia - best to compost
etc.

use care on fresh wood products - sawdust, chips, shavings - fresh wood actually absorbs nitrogen in the initial decomposition.

for the herbs - as mentioned, many Mediterranean origins like it "high and dry" - some of the best woody / Med. herbs I ever grew were in full sun in a New Jersey sand bank!
you may want to consider a raised bed area for those and keeping some of the sandy soil "as is"
post #19 of 20
Thread Starter 
Sounds like a compost heap might be the go.

About the lawn clippings - we have a fuel mower - wouldn't that leave some harmful residue from the fumes?
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #20 of 20
gas/diesel/<whatever> mowers are not a problem.
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