New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Mushroom Gills

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I've always thought that mushrooms such as the white button mushrooms and crimini should always be purchased before their gills open, the closed gills indicating freshness and better, richer flavor. However, I think I recently read that such mushrooms with open gills are more flavorful, and that the open gills don't always mean mushrooms that are less fresh. Anyone know?

shel
post #2 of 12
From my experience, open gills muck up the color and presentation somewhat. I also find the texture less appealing with the gills open on that type of mushroom.

And to show the hypocrisy of my above statement, the gills on portabellos bothers me not at all...
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #3 of 12

Them Gills on Them Mushrooms

Gills on mushrooms are not an indication of freshness, but rather, an indication of "age" (ripeness). In most cases, the more mature the mushroom, the more flavor, but it's worth the effort to remove the gills to avoid that inky color and the more mushy texture that they provide.
2 cents
post #4 of 12
Thing is, Creminis are young Portabella, and as they age they grow larger and their gills open up.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
post #5 of 12
This is good information for me. Btw talking bout Mushroom, i have some site to identify Mushroom at shrooms.com/help_identify.htm.
post #6 of 12

Identifying Mushrooms

I love the 'Shrooms, but remember, there are zillions of toxic species that so closely resemble edible ones that only lab geeks can tell the difference--be careful about "home learning" which mushrooms are which. You don't just get a little sick if you screw up--you die!
post #7 of 12
well yeah you can die....but if you start foraging with knowledgable mycologists/mycofogists and learn what's edible in your area it's golden.

Right now is the very beginning of MO.'s morel season.

You don't die from polypores.....hen of the woods, chicken of the woods or any look alikes.

Chanterelles have no lookalikes here....unless jack o lanterns look like chanterelles...not really.

I stick with the ones that taste great and are easy to discern.....morels, chanterelles, boletes, black trumpets, hen of the woods, oysters, tree ears, chicken of the woods......
some of the others just don't have enough flavor to bother eating a wild shroom.
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #8 of 12
Dont eat poisonous Mushroom..
post #9 of 12
good idea:rolleyes:
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #10 of 12
I found this site for various Mushroom plus picture :)

Identify Mushrooms
post #11 of 12
interesting site.
starting out the best thing to do is go with people who have been hunting in the area for years......eat what you can identify.

there is a corny saying amoung shroom hunters...."there are old mushroom hunters and bold mushroom hunters, there are no old bold mushroom hunters".

Several in our mycological group will eat 80 or so varieties. There are numerous that eat gyromytra (false morels).....
more power to them. Death from a mushroom can be very ugly. you get sick, you get better, 3 days later your organs start to shut down.....not a thing doctors can do about it but start transplanting.
Most chefs that cook with wild mushrooms know them. Each area of the country has different look alikes. That's where immigrants get in trouble, they eat what was wonderful in their country and is harmful here.
Kids looking for a high end up eating deadly ones.
People not sure what they are picking and cook "a mess of shrooms" can get in trouble.

Wild mushrooms are wonderful, they are a joy to find and a delight to work with.....plus mushroom hunters think your a goddess if you can make morels and cream. Climbing up the pedistal now getting ready for the morel hunt in 10 days. :bounce::chef: Secret recipe: morels, 40% cream, makers mark (or cognac, or maderia, or nothing) salt, pepper and light olive oil. I've fielded calls for years for that recipe, it's been in the paper, it's been published all over the place. What you'd think would be a no brainer is special to those that don't cook much, or bread and deep fry morels.:crazy::confused::eek:
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #12 of 12
Oh.. we must careful with this kind of Mushroom..
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking