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What do you do with a rutabaga

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
My roommate recently bought a bunch of rutabaga for no apparent reason (I am pretty sure he thought it was something else...). However, I really don't know what to do with them. I've seen several recipes online, but was wondering if anyone here had any suggestions?
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"Never use water unless you have to! I'm going to use vermouth!" ~Julia Child

"No chaos, no creation. Evidence: the kitchen at mealtime. "
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post #2 of 15
Rutabagas are the glamor girls of root vegetables. In addition to being better dressed, they're flavor sharpness/sweetness levels puts them between turnips and parsnips -- shading towards turnips. Treat them exactly as you would turnips, but with more assurance. Or, as parsnips but with more respect.

Bake, roast, steam, braise. They're bitter if not cooked until tender. You can saute them only after cooking them through in some other way. I've never tried frying. Write and let me know how it turned out.

My favorite uses for rutabagas are partnering beef in a braise, with carrots and/or apples in a gratin -- or combine the two for a tzimmes. I like it mashed into a blend of other roots,

BDL
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post #3 of 15
Strawberry & rutabaga pie.
post #4 of 15
I love them in with a cream of vegetable soup. Generally team them up with onion, garlic, carrots, potatoes, butternut squash. Just roughly chop with the rest of the veg, saute all in a little oil for 15 mins, bung in enough chicken/ veg stock, maybe some white wine also to just cover, simmer for an hour, blend, season. Bit of ginger powder and paprika goes well in that, maybe some curry powder, dollop of sour cream/greek yoghurt and croutons to serve.

Can also julienne them and use in stir fry, especially if you've run out of water chestnuts or bamboo shoots. Blanch for a few minutes first. They make a pretty good addition.
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post #5 of 15
Rutabaga was a standard ingredient in my mom's vegetable beef soup. I've also had them served raw in a relish tray. They tasted like a cross between a carrot and a turnip.

I believe some call them "swedes" but I'm not sure why.
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post #6 of 15
Mezzaluna, swedes are what we call them in the UK, they are amongst the few vegetables that my kids love, therefore we eat them a lot at home. Peel and dice then boil and simmer for about 40-50 mins. As BDL says they are bitter if not cooked enough, then mash with lots of butter and freshly ground black pepper. Another way is like parsnips, roasted in honey they are good with roasted meats.
post #7 of 15
Probably the most underutilized vegetable in America; certainly the most underutilized root, rutabaga can be cooked any way you'd treat other roots; including roasting, baking, mashing, boiling, stir-frying, etc.

Here's one of my favorite ways of making them:

Nutmeg-Glazed Rutabaga

3 tbls unsalted butter
2 lbs rutabaga
2 cups chicken stock
3 tbls sugar
Freshly grated nutmeg

Peel rutabaga and cut into 1/2-inch cubes.

Melt butter in a large skillet. Add the rutabaga, stock, sugar and a pinch of nutmeg. Bring to boil over high heat. Reduce heat, cover, and simmer until tender, about 25 minutes.

Remove rutabaga and set aside. Boil until liqid reduces to a syrup, about 15 minutes. Return rutabage to skillet and toss to coat. Dust with nutmeg before serving.

I also like them as part of a roasted-root vegetable medley. Lately I've been using Molly Katzen's Roasted Root Vegetables with Pear Glaze recipe (found in her "The Vegetable Dishes I Can't Live Without"), sometimes substituting agave for the pear nectar.
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post #8 of 15
In England they are known as Swede, in other parts of the UK as turnip.
They are one of the most used vegetables during the winter, often as an ingredient in hearty stews or casseroles and in soups. 'Bashed Neeps' is an essential part of a traditional Burns' Supper (it means mashed turnips!). Chappit tatties and neeps is a mixture of potatoes and swede, boiled then mashed with butter, cream and lots of black pepper.

i also like them oven roasted with other root vegetables like parsnips.
post #9 of 15

Dessert

What's the difference between rhubarb and rutabaga?

If for nothing else, rutabaga can be boiled in a pot to make the pot shiny as new.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #10 of 15
Mapiva, rutabaga is a globe-shaped root that grows underground.
Here's a picuture of one:

Rhubarb is a vegetable (I think??), the stalks of which are edible. The leaves are toxic though.
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post #11 of 15

do you think you could say a little more about strawberry and rutabaga pie? It sounds like it cook be good...

post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by abefroman View Post

Strawberry & rutabaga pie.


You sure you're not thinking of Strawberry and Rhubarb pie?  Which btw can be to die for! 

post #13 of 15

I would really love a recipe for strawberry/rutibaga pie which I have never had the pleasure of tasting or for that matter seen a recipe for.

 

If on the other hand we are talking rutabaga I love them  cut with a parrissienne scoop and then braised with stock, butter, fresh parsley, sugar, nutmeg  s&p and served with any kind of roasted beef. Can be served mashed with butter and seasoning, also very tasty and not as heavy or filling as mashed potato.

 

 

No such thing as strawberry rutabaga pie.  Rhubarb is a reddish celery stalk  like vege. and is not even close to rutabaga

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #14 of 15

chefedb,

I don't know why the reason for such a pie :p I tried pumpkin pie for the first time of my many years the other night. OMG it is something that should never have been created.  Why is this thing even in existence??  Yuk yuk and more yuks.

 

Rutabagas (swedes) are fantastic iin casseroles, mash, stews, roasted etc.  The way nature intended them to be.  Same for pumpkin :) 

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #15 of 15

Try Pumpkin and Peanut butter soup. It  is really good. I don't like pumpkin pie either, or the fake mince pie we make in this country.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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