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Chocolate Showpiece

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hi all,

I am going to attempt a chocolate showpiece, and I was wondering if any one had any hints or tips. i.e. thickness when using tempered chocolate, stencils, moulds etc, anything would help. thank you in advance
post #2 of 10
Don't discount the use of chocolate clay.
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
can you please elaborate?

What is chocolate clay?

Is it the same as plastic chocolate (modeling chocolate)

THANKS
post #4 of 10
yeah it is , you mix corn syrup in to the chocolate , cant remember the ratios and let it sit for at least 3 hours then knead it and roll it and you can do all kinds of things with it

cant wait to see what you do
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
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when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #5 of 10
If you are making a chocolate showpiece, modeling chocolate (aka: chocolate plastique, etc) should only be used for accent pieces at best. It does NOT have the strength to hold up or support major cast pieces that are made from tempered chocolate.
post #6 of 10
so how does the tempered chocolate become stronger , and would you need internal structures for things like this , this is an area that i would love to learn more about
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the reply regarding the plastic chocolate, however I am very familiar with it. The quantities are half the amount of syrup to chocolate. Tempered chocolate has its own strength due to the crystallization in the cocoa butter. So the stronger you want the thicker you make it or the more structures you place on your piece.
post #8 of 10
For structural pieces, you need THICK cast couveture--at least 1/2" thick. You can use many things, including sausage casing, surgical latex tubing, vinyl tubing, and, um, ah,... "those funny balloons" that you find at the family planning section at drugstore....

With such items filled with tempered couvture, you can wrap the the tube around cake forms, free forms, etc, and blast off in the freezer for a minute or two.

Another possibility other than chocolate is croquant. This is nothing more than two parts carmelized sugar to one part flaked almonds. When this mixture is still hot you can rollit out to desired thickness beween two sheets of silicone paper and cut, shape or form while still hot. When cold it has the same properties as glass--very strong and very brittle. I have made many logos, signs, showpieces, etc. with this material. Over 3/8" thick is very strong and won't melt in sunlight or halogen lighting, but it does need to be sealed with a food grade laquer so humidity won't soften it. g2 gas
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #9 of 10

Pour some sugar or.....

Multi media:

Tempered Chocolate
Poured Sugar
Chocolate Plastique
Pastillage
Then there is:
Marzipan
Pulled Sugar
Spun Sugar
Caramel
Nougatine

Chocolate Coverd Croquant......

So many sweets, so little time.....:lol:

Plan it out eight ways to sunday and have a ball.

Can you use a structure frame?

What is this for? An event?
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
I am building the chocolate centrepiece for a competition.

I was after methods and tips for building the piece. Anything would help i.e. thickness of tempered chocolate for supports, moulds, stencils, anything that would assist me. Thanks
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