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creme brulee cheesecake?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
hey,
any of you pastry chefs out there have a recipe for a creme brulee cheesecake? i use to make one for our restaurant, but have lost or misplaced teh recipe..really itching to make it again, so any help would be gratefully appreciated..or maybe you can make up a recipe for me too! is that being too pushy? thanks all
joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #2 of 7
First, if you "Google" "creme brulee cheesecake", you can easily find a couple of recipes.

Second, if you look at these recipes, then think about what a cheesecake is (a custard), then you know that you've really known the recipe all along.

Creme Brulee is eggs, sugar, vanilla, and cream. Basically just a simple custard with a nice, crackly, burned top. The burned top is what makes a brulee a brulee (duh).
What is cheesecake but a custard with cream cheese in it? You can make any "plain" cheesecake, then simply sugar the top and either torch or broil it right before serving time......and voila.......Creme Brulee Cheesecake.....there you go.:lips:
post #3 of 7

Hello, I currently have a Cheesecake business, and I´ve seen other companies selling their Creme Brulee Cheesecakes online.  Do you have an idea how they do it with the sugar on top so it doesn´t dissolve? Thanks

post #4 of 7

sugar is sprinkled on top and quickly carmelized with a butane torch after the cake is out and cooled. just like a regular creme brulee.

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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #5 of 7

Ideally, you want your cheesecake very cold before doing the brulee. 

 

In an ideal world, the dessert would then be served immediately --  storage does not improve a brulee.  Also, you can't really cut a brulee topping.   As a single serving a whole 2" thick, 9" diameter cheesecake is a bit largish.  So, that's something which does not often too happen.  Just hold off for as long as you can and cut slices wide enough to stand vertically, then use a torch and brulee individual slices.  Or bake as individual servings in ramekins or molds lined with cupcake papers. 

 

You can get away with refrigerating but you'll get condensation on it; and since it toughens, you'll lose a lot of the crack.  I've never tried freezing brulee, can't say for sure, but don't guess it's a good idea.

 

FWIW, I find that "rawer" sugars, like turbinado and piloncillo work better for brulee than regular white or brown.

 

BDL

post #6 of 7

I sometimes buy mini pastries for very large parties,  I have bought creme brulee tarts and the topping on them looks like burned sugar, but is really just a clear glaze with some caramel flavoring swirled in to look like it is a burned sugar.  It is not crackly like a true burned sugar, but looks good.  I don't know if the creme brulee cheesecakes have the same thing, but I suspect they do, since any sugar topping would liquefy.

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post #7 of 7

You could get around the issue of slicing and such by baking individual cheesecakes in ringmolds, and torching them to order.

 

In terms of a recipe, thats trickier. Yes, you can brulee a cheesecake and call it "creme brulee cheesecake." But cheesecake is very dense. Creme Brulee, on the other hand, is baked until barely set. If you were to bake a traditional creme brulee in a timbale, and un-mold it, it would look like a flan, and once you started torching it, it would begin to "melt."

 

My point is that, in my opinion, a creme brulee cheesecake should be a combination of the two textures. Softer than a cheesecake, but with enough body to stand on its own. If you can't find a good recipe online, try taking a creme brulee recipe and substituting 75% of the cream with cream cheese, and replace 25% of the yolks with whole eggs (the whites will add more structure). Of course, the recipe will need some tweaking, but that's where I would start.

 

That said, I'm sure the magic google machine can find a recipe for you if you're willing to do some sifting.

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