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When health codes ruin the integrity of food

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
We all know about how health codes in kitchen operation are important, yada yada yada... but you know there are times when these very same codes get in the way of good eating. This occurred to me when I was reading an article about Chinese BBQ places in some Canadian cities being slapped with penalties related to the storing of various Chinese BBQ products in the "traditional" way (i.e. putting it under a heat lamp in a windowed display case. Refrigerating or storing it above 60 C for any extended period of time would utterly destroy that delicious taste and texture.

So, what others foods in your opinion are diminished when they must be prepared/stored/etc. in the manner approved by the local health department? Hollandaise? Cakes? Something else? Please share.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #2 of 11
All it takes is some culturally inexperienced food inspector. That's why it's impossible to have a Korean BBQ here where you cook your own food at the table but fondue is OK. Go figure.
post #3 of 11
If they understood what was going on, wouldn't most health inspectors have a cow over sous vide?
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
That's odd, we have plenty of Korean BBQ places here in the area and from what I know there haven't been many hitches... in fact I think there are more Korean BBQ places here in Southern Ontario than there are fondue places.

Also, I do think some inspectors do have a cow over sous-vide... even I'm a little wary (although you can call me a hypochondriac if you wish).
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #5 of 11

Probing a steak

In the UK all cooked food must reach 82 degrees C, this is not a law, it is an EEC directive. So if a customer orders say, a rare steak, obviously you are not going to reach that kind of temperature without overcooking it. Although a temperature probe is an essential instrument in any kitchen I don't believe you can cook everything to a uniform temperature and be governed by the little beepy thing.

The reason we keep temperature records is for our own benefit and not to satisfy the EHO (Environmental Health Officer). If a customer makes a complaint to an EHO, the first thing they will want to see is your temp. records, if you dont have any, you cannot defend yourself (due dilligence). I have found the EHO's to be good here, they give a lot of advice and they do know what is going on.

Ages ago I went to a local chain restaurant where they could not cook me a rare or medium rare steak, the only choices were medium or well done, a classic example of inexperienced staff and management covering their own a**es and forgetting about the customer.
post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
82 degrees C is about 180 F, which means not only is the food well done, it's "WELL DONE". Poor Brits, no wonder your food reputation is so maligned.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #7 of 11
several guys are making their own sausages (drying in a cellar), proscuitto, etc....just can't find the key.......

raw cheese, comeon that's why it's good

raw milk, if someone wants it, is aware of the potential problems....I'm all for consumers getting info and making their own decisions.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #8 of 11
Here in the US, technically, it's a violation of the FDA Food Code to cook certain steaks below 145 internal temp.

Sirloin, Ribeye, Strip that have been Jaccarded (Needle Tenderized) do not qualify as a 'whole intact muscle' beef product.

Most HI's here either pretend they are not aware of this or they pretend to assume the steaks are not jaccarded

Cat Man
post #9 of 11
I ought to correct myself before someone else does. Things have changed a little recently and the temp for reheating in Scotland is indeed 82C but for the rest of the UK the core temp for cooked joints of meat and poultry must reach 70C for a minimum of two minutes, still very hot. Fish and steaks do not appear to be included now.

:confused: When did you last visit Britain?
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hahaha, sorry if I offended I was just trying to be funny. Went to Britain my one and only time last September visiting family. Really, I think in general the food there's no worse than the food around here.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #11 of 11
No offence taken :cool:

LOL chilled cheese is really bad :lol:
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