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Rice

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Ok,

How do I cook rice PERFECT.

Long Grain white as well as brown.

For white, I usually use the rinse, then add water up to first knuckle, bring to a boil, then cover and simmer for a little bit until absorbed. but to be honest, it's always a crap shoot on it coming out good. directions on bag i've tried and it comes out worse.

Last time I tried to cook brown rice they all seemed to explode into a mush. did it the same way, but cooked it longer as brown rice takes a while.

I'm using a Le Creuset cast iron sauce pan (3.75qt i believe)

Time to invest in a rice cooker?
I'm going to braise some shortribs tonight and would like some white rice. maybe jasmine?

Whats a little something different I can do other than just plain rice that will go well with a red wine shortrib braise.

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post #2 of 22
I use the exact same method you do for cooking rice on the stovetop (the knuckle as a measurement) and the rice cooker and I haven't had problems in a very very long time. If you want to be more precise than that I would suggest probably a 1:1.5 ratio of rice to water (assuming you're making white rice like jasmine or basmati or japanese-style rice like calrose. When you say it's a crap shoot do you mean you get results ranging from undercooked to mushy rice? If so then it's really a matter of consistent measurements.

Also, when I cook rice I let it sit for about 5 minutes covered and another 5-15 minutes uncovered after it's "done", upon which you can fluff and serve it. Also, I generally let it cook at low heat (after the water comes to a boil) for exactly 20 minutes, no more and no less. I don't like brown rice so I don't cook it, but I'd up the time to 40 minutes and maybe add a little more water.

Other good accompaniments to a braised dish would be a pretty plain risotto (like milanese), polenta, gnocchi, flatbreads absorb the stew well too, etc.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #3 of 22
I cook rice similarly to Blueicus. Also concur on the water ratio for jasmine or basmati. Other types of rice use different ratios.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 22

great short grain brown rice

Low and Slow is the mantra,

Start with 2 cups liquid to 1 cup rice (I say start: some brown rice is drier and some pots don't have a tight lid), bring liquid to a boil, adjust salt and add rice, stir and turn down to a very low simmer ( check in a few , lift lid and give it a quick look see, it should be barely bubbling, sleeping babies my culinary 101 chef called it), and put on lid and check in 45 minutes, don't stir it releases starch, resulting in sticky rice. Simmmering too hard is like stirring it releases starch.
There will be holes or pits in rice, tilt pan or make a hole down to bottom of pan and see if there is liquid left, now taste some... if it is done to your liking drain off any liquid that is left, if it needs more time and there is no liquid left, add a few more TB's and DON'T STIR, put lid back and check in 10 more minutes.
Good Luck
post #5 of 22
My response is only for white rice; I haven't cooked brown rice. I grew up with long-grain white rice. I usually don't add any salt or oil or anything while cooking, except occasionally a little saffron for certain dishes.

I say a rice cooker is the way to go. They don't cost much. The water to rice proportions they suggest, in my experience, are good for medium-grain rice such as calrose. For basmati or jasmine rice I use slightly less water.

For cooking in a pan, I rinse the rice and drain. For medium-grain rice, proportion of rice to water I use is 2:3. For basmati or jasmine rice, I use 3:4. The pan needs to have a tight-fitting lid.

I bring it to a boil on medium with the lid cocked a bit, then right away turn it down 'til barely simmering with the lid on snug. I simmer 20 minutes, then remove it from the heat. For long grain rice, it's ready now. With medium grain I gently stir it, then let it sit covered, off the heat for 10 more minutes.
post #6 of 22
I like brown rice, in my opinion it is more flavorful as well as being healthier. I use the oven to cook it. I put 1 cup of short grain brown rice in an ovenproof pot with a tight fitting lid, 1 2/3 cups water ( 3 parts rice, 5 parts water ) put the lid on and stick in a 350 degree oven for one hour. Pull it out, let it rest 5 - 10 minutes, take off the cover, fluff and serve.

Longer grain brown rice can go with 1 part rice, 2 parts water, same process.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #7 of 22
I really should try brown rice. It is more healthy and I also like to take on a new ingredient and figure out what makes it best for my taste buds.
post #8 of 22
In response to cooking white rice, I begin by melting butter in my pan. I then add the rice and sautee it in the butter until it becomes translucent. Then I add the juice of one lemon. Add the salt and water as per instructions on the package. Cover, bring to a boil, then turn off heat. I let it sit (don't uncover!) for 10-15 minutes then fluff. It comes out perfectly for me.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #9 of 22
With Basmati I use 1.75 cups water to 1 cup rice and a pinch of salt. Basmati doesn't really release its fragrance until it, for the lack of a better word, "pops."
post #10 of 22

Here in Hawai'i

You can buy rice that's a mixture of brown and white. I believe the brown has been precooked so that the two kinds of rice finish cooking at the same time. It's for folks who love their white rice but feel that they *should* be eating brown rice.

Me, I'm happy to eat brown rice. I like the mixed brown and red rice from my health food co-op. It always cheers me up. Brown rice is great with salt and goma (ground roasted sesame seeds; you buy a little table grinder so that they're fresh).
post #11 of 22

How to make rice Eveyone will enjoy?

I was reading through the post about how to cook rice properly, and I found all the tips helpful, as I tend to do minute rice, not because I want to, but because I'm the only one who eats it. Which brings me to my question. Can anyone give my a good recipe for rice, of any type, that will appeal to someone who doesn't like rice because it's bland. I wish I had tips for cooking but I too need advice in this field.:roll::roll:
post #12 of 22
Put some hot Indian curry on it and it won't be bland any more :D I don't eat it plain.
post #13 of 22
I see that my methods might be the "driest" here. I don't like dry rice. I figure that how I make it needs to have the least steam escape, with a tight-fitting lid and perhaps lower cooking temperatures.
post #14 of 22

Solid Consistent results for White Rice:

16 minutes simmer covered. Then 16 minutes covered off heat.

For whatever reason, this recipe from one of our school's instructors has resulted in perfect white rice for me ever since I learned it.

Water/rice/salt to the pot...bring to a boil. Cover. Reduce heat and simmer for 16 minutes. Then remove from heat and let sit for 16 more minutes while still covered. Then fluff and serve.

You can play with the water/rice ratio a bit (1 part rice to 1.5-2pts water or even the knuckle method) but I have found that 1.5 works more consistently. And from there, the 16/16 method turns out perfect. And if, for some reason the rice is too moist, you can steam out some more of the water easily.

One piece of advice that I learned myself, the smaller the pot the better. For example, if you cook a small batch of rice (say 1 cup uncooked) in a medium sized pot, the rice tends to dry out since more rice is in closer proximity to the heat source.

Good luck!
post #15 of 22
Yes, plain rice IS bland. Brown rice with the bran on it is a little less bland. Plain pasta is bland. Plain potatoes are bland. You have to think of rice as a blank canvas, ready to accept a wide variety of culinary artistry.

It can be as simple as melting a pat of butter into it with a good sprinkling of grated parmesan, or a splash of soy sauce and some chopped green onions. Reheat last night's leftover rice with a bit of milk, some brown sugar and a handful of raisins for a tasty breakfast.

Usually when I cook rice it is to provide a pile of something to put the stir fry over, or as a side dish with steamed or sauted veggies mixed in. Sweat leek slices in olive oil, add a handful of chopped cashews and a teaspoon ( or more ) of your favorite curry powder and stir that into a pot of rice. Or maybe half a can of cream of mushroom or cheddar cheese soup. Consider Cajun style dirty rice, or red beans and rice. Some chopped jalapenos and a big glob of salsa.

Rice isn't just rice, it is a carrier for whatever culinary delights your imagination can conjure up.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #16 of 22
Hey RPMc,

Here are my methods:
long grain and Basmati rice, I cook like pasta: Add rice to lots of rolling boiling water with salt. Boil 10min. Pass through strainer, shake then back in the pot. Add a small pat of butter. let rest 5 min to equilibrate the humidity. fluff and serve.

Medium grain <regular> white chinese type rice and sushi type (non glutinous): Rinse rice with cold water until water is mostly clear (no more then 3 times). 1:1.5 rice to water ratio + pinch of salt per serving. The total volume must be 2 inches high minimum but no more then 4 inches (or so). Choose a tight fitting pot accordingly. Set on medium heat but leave open. wait until it simmers and bubble chimneys appear where simmering bubbles has form a tunnel. These are called <eyes> in Chinese. The rice will have started to hydrate already. close lid and set to very low. time 10 min. at 10min, take off the heat without opening and let rest 15min. Open, fluff and serve.

Brown rice and glutinous white rice:
soak overnight in cold water (or a couple of hours in warm). line a steamer basket with a cotton cloth, add wet rice. Set the basket atop boiling water and close. It should cook up in 15 min. Taste test it.

I hope something here will work for you.
Luc H.
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #17 of 22
Luc, I like your first method, will have to try it. Do you think it would work with brown rice as well?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #18 of 22
Thread Starter 
check out my short ribs post in the other section,

came out good,

rinse,

2 cups rice,

3 cups water

boil, cover simmer for 15-20 minutes

uncover, let sit for 15-20 minutes (in a le crueset sauce pan so retained heat pretty good)

and came out good.

it was jasmine rice

I didn't add any butter or salt though.
post #19 of 22
Hi Mapiva,

because of the nature of the bran around the rice grain, it doesn't boil as well as long grain white rice or Basmati.
What I would try is let the brown rice soak overnight. Bran cannot be forced to hydrate quickly. I guess it will take a little longer then 10 min to cook though but test it as you go along.

Luc H.
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #20 of 22
That looks good!
Luc H
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #21 of 22
I just made a post about something that an Iranian friend made once. Then I thought about the way he made rice. This was long grain rice.

He'd use a heavy pan and add salt and some vegetable oil--quite a bit of oil, actually. He steamed it just about like I do.

Toward the end of the cooking, most of the oil would go to the bottom of the pan and the rice ended up with a crunchy browned part at the bottom of the pan. The crunchy part was his favorite, and I really liked it too.
post #22 of 22
I was at a loss when i came to italy because the rice package didn;t give you the proportions of rice to water, since i'd always cooked it the american way (whcih i know is not only american, of course, must have come from somewhere) and american rice packages always told you how much of each. Then i saw how people cooked it here. Like Luc does, just like pasta., (Of course, in risotto it';s different, but even then, you don;t measure, you just keep adding broth or liquid till it;s done. If the rice is older and drier, or maybe different size, or whatever, it won;t work).

Has the advantage that you don;t have to wash it, since you drain it.

I always did brown rice the same way, boiling, salted (please, salted) water, dump in the rice and cook until it tastes cooked.

To make chinese rice, I follow joyce chen;s method - put the rice you want in the pot. Measure the height with your finger. Put the finger on the top of the rice and fill with water to the same point. Works for me. I do prefer it just boiled though. I don't usually like to eat it sticky.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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