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Transitioning from Chef/Owner to Chef

post #1 of 6
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post #2 of 6
What I think it boils down to is your job is to please the customer, in this case it's you employer. So the final descission will totally be up to them.

That being said, you should stick to your guns if you want to maintain some sort of culinary integrety. If that means getting a second opinion on what each of you consider the better product. Also your the one with the experience and that is something that should constantly be brought up.

This is a real catch 22 isn't it.
post #3 of 6
As a line cook, I cook food other people have designed all the time. In the six or so years I have been a cook, I have had a few doubts here and there about the chefs or owners idea of "good food" and brought them up. Usually even the most stuffy Chef/Owner will ask for a second opinion and even a third or fourth. Just remind your friend that you do have the experience. So your not trying to bang on her ability to cook but maybe someone other then her and her family ought to give the dish a try, the wider the sampling the better. Then (as has happened to me) when someone else says "This is great!!" , shrug your shoulders and say "OK, that's what they want."

Standing up for your idea of good food is perfectly acceptable, just don't take it too far. Best of luck.
"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #4 of 6
Unfortunately, this is what you signed up for. What it boils down to is how much do you like your job. In the larger hotels and casinos, we have to deal with food & beverage directors telling us what to serve all the time. We may not agree, but if we push too far, they will just find someone who will do the job as they see fit. It sucks, but until you are the owner again, you may just have to deal with it.
It's Good To Be The King!
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It's Good To Be The King!
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post #5 of 6
Several of my friends are restaurant consultants, the owners pay them to come in and do or redo food (etc).....when they are brought on board the media lists them, they are known for their excellence in food. Most media in town follow the chefs.

I just had a conversation yesterday with a good friend that openned a new restaurant with a couple of partners, one holds the checkbook.....aka "money guy". My friend is well known in the area and has been exec for several top places in the area......
Money guy just told him to increase lunch offerings by 6, add to the dinner menu, etc....their outdoor tables add about 30 to the guest count. They are working out of a tiny tiny galley kitchen....
Gotta love the money guys. My friend cooks his own food fyi, but has been told to increase offerings.
Money guy knows he partnered with one of the best who brings in people just on his name.

It's interesting watching all the various deals my friends get into......
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #6 of 6
in my past i have opened 5 different restaurants for private people..you give up alot in the end(ego, time, brain cells etc)..you are there to improve their bottom line, period..i think it is hard once you have had your own gig to give up being the boss..in the end it is her signature on the lease, bank loan and everything else...in the end, you can walk away from it, she can't(without taking a hose)..opening a restaurant is daunting,even for us who supposedly know what we're doing!i'm sure she is using your great expertise and knowledge to the fullest,so you should feel very useful even though you may not be used to being unrecognized as when you ran your own show..sometimes its tough to take a 'backseat', but she is new at this and hopefully is learning all she can from you.. sounds like you are already frustrated that you are giving more than getting..these may be warning signs as well..as far as the food goes..i would perhaps do some 'tastings' either with the staff, friends or put dishes up as specials and see what the response is...i have done that many times..let the customer tell you..they love to be involved in menu decisions and ultimately they are the ones you are there to please...
joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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