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Petites Fours - Too Sweet

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I just made petites fours for an afternoon tea. The recipe called for pouring the fondant over twice, but the result was so sweet that - unlike Lays potato chips - you could eat just one, and only one.

What did I do wrong?

Also, I had a heck of a time getting the fondant on the sides of those little squares. Is there a secret to that? The corners were especially hard to deal with.
Laurie Stroupe
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Laurie Stroupe
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post #2 of 12

Hi

i think dipping them should be done like these, cool the squares then dip in your fondant, we use chocolate when we make them so its not too sweet.
YouTube - Petits Fours è¿·ä½*蛋糕
post #3 of 12
Sounds like your fondant is too thick and possibly too sweet. Certainly two layers of too thick would end up too sweet, tout suite. Test for consistency by dipping or pouring one layer on a couple of test petits fours (that's the right spelling, BTW) -- one layer should cover, but should be thin enough on the sides to see through. (That's why you need two coats.)

Fondant temperature must be 98 - 104 F. Below 97 and it won't pour or dip properly. Above 105 and it will lose its shine. Was yours too cold?

Petits fours and other small pieces are more often dipped than poured.

Poured fondant recipe is different than rolled fondant -- usually as a result of being thinned with simple syrup. What recipe were you using?

BDL
post #4 of 12
Classic petits fours usually are painfully sweet anyway (think fudge). Some people like that.

I use a squeeze bottle to apply the fondant. One coat should suffice, if there's not too much water in the fondant.
post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
I didn't use a thermometer, but I think that it probably got too cold as I went along.

The recipe was 9 cups of powdered sugar, 1/2 cup water, 1/2 cup corn syrup, vanilla extract and almond extract. I heated it in the top of a double boiler until it was thin.

One error I can tell is that I took the top of the double boiler off to pour. I should have left it over the hot water to keep the temperature up.

After seeing the video, I think mine was too thick.
Laurie Stroupe
Laurie's Cobalt World
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Laurie Stroupe
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post #6 of 12
I'm not a pastry chef by any means, and did poured fondant badly many times before I quit struggling and started following instructions. Pastry is picky, I feel your pain.

Did I mention picky? The key isn't high temperature, it's the right temperature range. You have less than 10 degrees to work in -- better if you could keep it within 5: 98F - 102F, inclusive.

I also know that recipe -- it's basic (rolled) fondant, and heated to the right temperature, needs some simple syrup to pour thin. I can't tell you how much because it's an eyeball thing with everything at temperature. IIRC, it will take around 1/2 to 3/4 cup.

Not to over stress a problem that hasn't happened, but you have to be careful not to overheat either. A too hot fondant will pour well, but won't glisten when it dries. As close as you can get to 100F, and lots of stirring to keep a skin from forming.

So... the big two investments: Thermometer and ladle.

Good luck,
BDL
post #7 of 12
To me, there's "powdered sugar icing" and "fondant".
Fondant (the poured kind) involves a process where you heat sugar and water to soft ball stage, let it rest in a mixer bowl til it reaches 140 degrees F, then paddled til it becomes thick, white and glossy. You then immediately remove it from the mixer and put it in a bowl or bag and let rest overnight. To use, gently heat fondant in a heavy bottomed saucepan not exceeding 104 degrees.
To thin, add simple syrup if it's too viscous.

When I dip petit fours (and I do mean dip-it's SO much easier) I use fondant. It dries to a fairly hard sugar shell unlike "powdered sugar icing", which doesn't get quite as hard or glossy as a properly made fondant.
post #8 of 12
I respectfully disagree about the dipping.I fill my bottles, place them in warm water and go to town.
I think the most important aspect of any small piece to be dipped or poured is taking the time ti cut very straight sides. I'm tellin ya, hit those four corners and a dab in the center, I'd go out on a limb and challenge someone to a race.:rolleyes:
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #9 of 12
Don't like doing them, but when I do, I first put down a thin (1-2mm) layer of marzipan, then put em on a grid, and ladle/pour on top, agitating the grid to get those sides covered. Usually I treat the sides with some kind of crumb 1/3 of the height. A shot of some kind of booze usually helps in cutting the sweetness of the fondant.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #10 of 12
I don't think it's a matter of agreeing or disagreeing. Everybody has their own way of doing things for one reason or another. For me, having fondant in bottles isn't practical, since I have to do all my own dishes (by hand) and having to wash out bottles is just one more thing to add to an already giant pile at the end of the day.

I think maybe most of us can agree though, that seeing a order of petit fours on the books isn't something that makes us go, "whoo hoo!":bounce:
post #11 of 12
Chef P, I use the quart bottles and acually store in them. You're right about it being a hassle if you're not doing daily. Time for a part time plongee, no?
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #12 of 12
If "plongee" means "dishwasher", I say ****, yes!
But it's not for me to decide. Boss now has the highest paid dishwasher in Jefferson County. If that what he wants I guess.
What really kills me is there is an automatic dishwasher sitting out in the field next to the bakery slowly being obscured by the ever growing grass.
It's been sitting out there because Boss doesn't have time to plumb it in because he's too busy fishing. At this point I'd settle for a sprayer hose.:lol::mad:
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