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What is the difference between cooks/chefs? - Page 3

post #61 of 79

 

Quote:
...You are the Chef, when you become proficient in what you do...

Got to agree with FoodPump here, when you become proficient at cooking, then you are a "proficient cook".

 

When you can "manage" a station/line/kitchen/food production facility, you "might" qualify as a chef.

 

IMHO, "chef" is a "management title", "cook" is a trade classification.

 

One can become a "trained cook" through apprenticeship, OJT, or culinary education or combination thereof. One becomes a "proficient cook" only through experience and continuing education.

 

One can become a "chef" by chance or design. Chance means outliving the rest of the cooks and making no obvious mistakes

 

By design means learning about

  • Personnel management
  • Profit and Loss Statements
  • Business Finance
  • Business Law
  • Health and Safety codes
  • Investor Relations
  • Customer Service
  • Inventory control
  • Negotiation

whether the learning is through experience or formal education makes no difference, the knowledge is what counts.

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #62 of 79

Chef, Cook, Butcher, Chef Steward   Just get your money, buy whatever you want,retire early  and leave the Ego in your car.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #63 of 79

I'm soo confused...really, like many of my peers I was shy about being called a chef. I was trained by a Yergan Molltoff, a german who himself was just completing a Masters Chef program from a school in Vien. Our deal was for him to teach me anything he could in exchange for English lessons. I was 14, a busboy at the Fort Leavenworth Officers Club. As Yeargan was doing his school work via mail(no computers in those days) I  was giving him the americaized lingo to be able to express himself in the kitchen...this went on until I was 17 ..including a summer we both rented rooms in an old masion and cooked every night after work. I remember my mom begging to attend a (now de-funked) chef school in Wash. D.C.....I went down and took the tour...and thought"I should be teaching here!"...I was a very cocky 18 year old....but in years past i felt funny being called "Chef"...my teacher was a Real Chef...I just cooked for a living...didn"t ever resolve  this until after years of management work out of the kitchen, I decided to return to my roots and have some fun. It was my customers at the cafe and the catering gigs that were always addressing me as "Chef"....now ,so many years later...It does't bother me at all! For what I charge for a Clambake, Pig roast, or Eggs Bennie at the cafe....they may call me anything..even "Late for dinner!" 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #64 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed Buchanan View Post

Chef, Cook, Butcher, Chef Steward   Just get your money, buy whatever you want,retire early  and leave the Ego in your car.


Ha ha I like this Ed.

post #65 of 79

HI,

 

Good points. And all that is subject to change in the heat of battle.but I have no real idea what the titles really mean?

Keep it up!

post #66 of 79

rereading this thread this morning.....still interesting reading.  

 

cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #67 of 79

The Chef is the one that always shows up, The cooks are the ones that call in drunk, have to get bailed out of jail, bitch about their job and want more money...........Did I leave anything out ??????????????  ChefBillyB

post #68 of 79

Now that you mention it, yeah.... 

 

"Can I have next Friday off?  Oh, and I need more hours, my last paycheck couldn't even make rent......."

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #69 of 79

 The CHEF is the guy who can cook anything and fix anything in the kitchen.

The COOK is the guy who won't prep anything or clean anything unless he is told to.

( Although there are some exceptions, but not as many as we would like.)

post #70 of 79

wow, bunch of angry Chefs. Cooks, cook, take crap from Chefs, rely on noone as most of thier co-workers have issues, and get accused of being drunks,druggies or worse. Chefs do much the same but also take crap from owners, customers, health dept and suppliers. But get upset when they are called drunks or druggies, take days off cause they "need" it and swear they don't make enough money to put up with this kind of crap.

 

 

I really don't beleive that anymore then most of the negative stuff the others have written....it's stereotypical crap.

 

Chef's are cooks that are also managers.

 

Cooks are cooks, some with aspirations of becoming Chef's, some happy just doing their job and part of someone elses, some making a bad rep for cooks everywhere.

 

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #71 of 79

Gunnar makes good points.

 

BDL

 

post #72 of 79

I was once told by an army cook that the difference between a cook and a chef is a cook cleans up after his/her self and a chef has someone else to clean up after them.

"Ye can lead a man up to the university, but ye can't make him think."

Finley Peter Dunne
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"Ye can lead a man up to the university, but ye can't make him think."

Finley Peter Dunne
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post #73 of 79

Where I used to work, a Mom & Pop in Tucson, the owner was the Chef.  He did the majority of the ordering, showed up at 4am to do repair work, handled the hiring and firing of the kitchen staff, and designed the menu.  He was also an atrocious cook, in both his knowledge of food and his technique on the line.  I mean terrible.  Thankfully the menu was simple, and he had staffed himself with competent employees who could carry him; nevertheless, he was the perfect example--to me, at least--of why the term "chef" shouldn't be steered too far away from it's original meaning.  He was the chief.  He signed my paychecks and bossed me around the kitchen.  He also thought water was an acceptable substitution for cream in any application.

 

Cook are cooks.  Chefs are chiefs.  They often run hand in hand, but are not necessarily dependent on each other.

post #74 of 79

Ummmm....I am not trying to define the term chef, but I think the doctor/nurse comparison to chef/cook is either a simplistic and confusing metaphor OR incredibly accurate. I am a by trade a nurse practitioner. This means that I am an RN, APN, MSN, FNP-C (titles) and have had 9 years of college, I also have prescriptive authority with DEA scheduled drugs included, can have my own practice, etc. Essentially, I do the work that some physicians do, but at less cost/pay and with more experience. If I had a PhD in nursing, I would still be a nurse, but would also merit the title "Dr." So is the difference between a chef and cook a title, a social standing, or a difference in ability?.......reminds me of the age old question in ceramics.... does form follow function or does function follow form?

post #75 of 79

Gunner has good points all around.....

 

I'll have a drink and a smoke to that    

My feet are firmly planted in mid air
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My feet are firmly planted in mid air
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post #76 of 79

Ummmm....I am not trying to define the term chef, but I think the doctor/nurse comparison to chef/cook is either a simplistic and confusing metaphor OR incredibly accurate. I am a by trade a nurse practitioner. This means that I am an RN, APN, MSN, FNP-C (titles) and have had 9 years of college, I also have prescriptive authority with DEA scheduled drugs included, can have my own practice, etc. Essentially, I do the work that some physicians do, but at less cost/pay and with more experience. If I had a PhD in nursing, I would still be a nurse, but would also merit the title "Dr." So is the difference between a chef and cook a title, a social standing, or a difference in ability?.......reminds me of the age old question in ceramics.... does form follow function or does function follow form?

 

 

As a one time medic myself, I know that even if tyou DID have your PhD., you could still ONLY do exactly what was ordered by an M.D., because while a Doctorate in nursing is awesome, it's NOT the same as being a Medical Doctor, and hence, the difference between a Chef and a Cook.

"Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously."
Hunter S. Thompson
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"Life has become immeasurably better since I have been forced to stop taking it seriously."
Hunter S. Thompson
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post #77 of 79

It has been said that the word Chef means chief and therefore a Chef with no brigade should not be referred to as such.

I believe very strongly that although you may take a Chef out of the kitchen.....you can NEVER take the kitchen out of the Chef.

It's there always. A Chef is both a noun and an adjective.

post #78 of 79

Cooks cook.

Chefs manage cooks.

 

When I was a Sous Chef in a 313 room Hotel, I was directly responsible for all banquets, the dining room and the Pub. Indirectly responsible for the Pastry Kitchen and Garde Manger, as well as all BEO's, daily orders and the staff kitchen.

 

When I became the "Exec. Sous" I simply became directly responsible for all of it, plus taking over for the Chef in his absence.

 

When I became Chef... I cooked less and got way more headaches.

 

post #79 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by WannabeChef View Post

I love to cook and I aspire to be a chef one day..then I suddenly realized, I have heard the terms for different types of cooks/chefs but I have no real idea what the titles really mean?
line cook
sous chef
head chef chef steward

I'm sure there are more...can someone tell me them and a little about them?

Also, what kind of job would I be looking at if I had one?


line cook-the backbone of the kitchen. Responsible for the actual cooking of the food.

sous chef-generally 2nd in command. In full charge of the kitchen in absence of the head man.

head chef chef steward-head guy? Haven't heard that exact one before.

 

Alot of it is general/regional terms now. Someone called me the 'executive sous chef' awhile back. I'm not even sure what that entails.

In terms of job duties, once more it depends on location, type of establishment, number of employees, demographic, etc etc. It also depends on the setup of your heirarchy kitchenwise. Whether there is a head chef, or an executive chef, sous chef, jumior sous chefs, chef d'partie etc.

Different places use different titles.

 

I'm sous chef where i'm at & am responsible for everything except direct hiring. Cooking, cleaning, prepping, managing, delegating, disciplining, ordering, bartering with insane reps, inventory, invoicing, equipment, banquets, line service, catering, etc. So the further up the chain you move, the more you're worth. But you'd better be prepared for it. There's always somebody bucking for the job. I get my decision-making ripped apart daily by cooks looking to move up. It's fantastic. That's ok, though. Bring it on.
 

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