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First REAL Job

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I'm just a few shifts into my new job (website in signature) and it's great. I am working pantry but I get to sear fois gras, cook some fish and generally assist the saute.

We use only grade prime beef, which kicks serious tail. Speaking of tail... I have to (read: "get the pleasure of") boil live lobsters at the beginning of every shift.

The best part about the whole thing is the sous chef (restaurant is currently between exec chefs) is aware of my plans to do a three-year chef's apprenticeship beginning fall 09 and is committed to teaching me as much as possible over the next year and a half.

His words, "I want you doing EVERYTHING by the time you leave here."

I'm still slow (only five shifts under my belt) but he said that as soon as I catch the swing of things I'll start training saute.

I'm so stoked to get this job for my last year of college. Last summer I worked in a pizza kitchen, cool but not the kind of food I am interested in.

I had to share this. Feel free to respond in any way.

p.s. Has anybody here dined there?
p.p.s. if you get the chance, come in and order fois;)
post #2 of 12
Welcome to the brotherhood :chef:
Preparing a fine meal with quality ingredients is the most practical way we show our love. How we plate shows the depth of our caring.
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Preparing a fine meal with quality ingredients is the most practical way we show our love. How we plate shows the depth of our caring.
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post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks. It's an exciting industry and I plan to spend my life in it.
post #4 of 12
You got your 1st burns from the grill yet? :smoking:
Preparing a fine meal with quality ingredients is the most practical way we show our love. How we plate shows the depth of our caring.
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Preparing a fine meal with quality ingredients is the most practical way we show our love. How we plate shows the depth of our caring.
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post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
No, stabbed an oyster shell into my finger though.

Building a resume via scars and brain cells killed by alcohol.
post #6 of 12
You will go way farther by skipping the alcohol part.:smiles:
Welcome to the kitchen.
Fluctuat nec mergitur
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Fluctuat nec mergitur
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post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 
Moderation is the key. I am in college and I know quite a few people who will have to seriously deal with some of their habits upon graduation. That isn't a hurdle I wish to face so I don't practice that lifestyle.

That being said, after my first shift my chef took me out for two rounds of beers. We had a back-up of drainage in the basement and I cleaned it up... dirty job so I got rewarded.

Also, given my location, MICHIGAN, the only two things you can count on are bad economy and good beer. Bell's Two Hearted Ale is probably the catalyst for my career choice. Experiencing a new level of quality peaked my interest in other products.
post #8 of 12
Veg prep and saute. You'll learn more at those two stations about the art and craft of the food racket than anywhere else. Re the lobsters: Do you splint the tails to keep them straight? If not, you may want to ask Chef if you can try it. Huge difference down the line (sorry, can't help myself) for the cooks and the diners. Learn to sharpen your knives to scalpel, and learn to steel them until you can get several days out of your chef's.

Old man wisdom and gratuitous advice aside: Congratulations on your job. Wear it in good health. And good luck at turn and burn. You think an oyster knife in your piddie hurt, wait for 700 deg. The good thing is that scar tissue is less sensitive. You won't need those clumsy mitts when you're pulling sheet pans from the oven.

Yowzer,
BDL
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Awesome that my post got your attention BDL.

We do split the lobster tails, it's fun and I now know why one of those antique Sabatier canadian mastif Chef de chefs would come in handy in a knife roll.

Alas, despite using very high end ingredients and producing great food, we aren't required to have our own knives. We utilize a leasing service with ferrari knives that get sharpened every thursday. I was enormously disapointed by this but that's life. :(

I have been talking around and it seems the same for almost all the restaurants in Ann Arbor.

It gives me time to see what tools I work with and develop a decent set before my apprenticeship in Aug 09 though.
post #10 of 12
Ah, how I miss Bell's beer. Oberon was a thing of beauty. Haven't had it in years. Ann Arbor is great. I used to live at Division and Liberty, just a few blocks from where you are. Learned how to sling some serious fish at The Real Seafood Company. Also a Mainstreet Ventures restaurant. That was a long time ago.
It's Good To Be The King!
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It's Good To Be The King!
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post #11 of 12
Re the knives: As long as it's sharp. I actually have got a 12" antique, ai carbone K-Sabatier chef de chef -- but it's French and not a massif. Great knife. Goes through anything, and sharpens up very well indeed. Although you have to consider whether you want edge holding for tough duty, or just pure sharp. I used it for breaking a few chickens the other day and forgot that I hadn't used it since the last time it was sharpened -- so it had a new, very sharp edge. I sliced through two wing tips by accident when the phone rang and I got distracted. Clear through. No pressure. By accident. Cool.

Re the lobster: LOL. Splint with an "n." You tie or rubber band a tongue depressor or small skewer under the lobster's tail so it doesn't curl when you cook it. Extra trouble in the beginning, saves some trouble later. Mostly though the tail presents better. It isn't done that much in this country anymore. We did it at my first job, which was a restaurant so French the waiters farted Galuoise. Frisky lobsters being such a challenge, I thought we might commiserate. You haven't lived 'til you've tried it.

BDL
post #12 of 12
Dude .. screw the requirements. As soon as you can afford it, get your own & insist on using them. I mean ... what are they gonna do? Forbid you from using them? I sharpen mine on a diamond stone about twice a week.
Preparing a fine meal with quality ingredients is the most practical way we show our love. How we plate shows the depth of our caring.
Reply
Preparing a fine meal with quality ingredients is the most practical way we show our love. How we plate shows the depth of our caring.
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