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Non-meat Protein Sources

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Two of my doctors have suggested that I reduce substantially, or even eliminate, meat in my diet. This is not necessarily a permanent change, but essentially an experiment to see if reducing meat protein will help to eliminate or reduce a medical problem I'm having. And since my nutritionist and dietician is unavailable for a while, it seemed a good idea to start looking for non-meat protein sources by asking here.

So, what vegetables, grains, or nuts might make reasonable substitutes for meat protein. There's quinoa, and tofu that I can think of, but what else is there?

Thanks for any help ...

shel
post #2 of 22
If you can have dairy, eggs and cheese and other milk products.

And, of course, beans. In combination with rice, pretty complete. :D
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 
Ahh, yes - eggs! I forgot about them, although I eat a few boiled eggs every week.

Beans and rice are good choices, although I need to eat them in moderation. Certain cheeses may be very workable, althoughg I don't care much for milk

Good quality, organic, sugar free peanut butter on high quality,organic whole grain bread looks to be a good choice (add that to the Cheap Eats thread), especially with a few banana slices. I gotta watch my intake of that delicious treat though <sigh>.

Thanks!

scb
post #4 of 22
So many soya based products are widely available now and take on all the flavours you give them(as they have none of their own.) Quorn is a great substitute. TVP (Textured vegetable protein) can substitute or be an add to. A wee bit of steak mince and a handfull of TVP can make a great spag boll. Never tried it completely on it's own though.
Why not try Humus or Falafel Chick peas are nutritious. Wrapped in some flat bread or tortilla with a greek salad
Have you tried googling protien substitutes for meat? I'm sure there will be something interesting
Good luck. ..I'll count my blessings that i can still eat anything
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 
I looked up Quorn products and they don't appear to be anything I'd want to eat. What's "steak mince" and "spag boll?"

I enjoy chick peas and eat them often. I make hummus every now and then.

Thanks,

scb
post #6 of 22
Sorry, sometimes i forget about the great differences we have culinary-wise either side of the Atlantic.
Steak mince is very lean ground beef and spag boll is a shortened version of spaghetti bollognese.

I thought the same about quorn till i tried it. I use it in some highly spiced Indian vegetarian menu items, and I'd defy anyone to think it wasnt chicken.
You can buy deep-fried bean curd at your chinese supermarket... Lovely stuff if you slice it and add it to a veggie stir fry...Has no flavour, but it soaks up what you give it and its an added texture.
Always worth a try
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
Thanks for clarifying, bughut.

It wouldn't surprise me at all if the Quorn products taste good, however, they contain ingredients I'd rather not eat. I'm a little fussy at times, and much prefer - almost demand - high quality organic products. That's not to say I won't eat non-organic food (including some junk and fast food everynow and then), as some farmers' market items can be very high quality even though they are not organic.

scb
post #8 of 22
My dad and step mom are vegetarians. You would be surprised at how the non-meat products have gotten. Try MorningFarms breakfast sausage links, not the real thing, but very lean and actually quite good. I'll think of more...
It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
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It's a wonderful thing to be spoiled in the way of food.
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post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 
You must mean Morningstar Farms. I've tried their products a few times, found them not at all to my liking. My recollection is that the products I tried were pretty laden with salt and fat compared to other similar products. Morningstar Farms is owned by Kellogs, and I try very hard to stay away from mass-produced foods made by or owned by large corporations

Thanks for jumping in.

scb
post #10 of 22
Split pea soup
Indian mansoor dal sauce with rice or flat bread
is seafood out of the question? I could go crazy with that.
post #11 of 22
Thread Starter 
I probably should have been more specific. Meat = beef, pork, other red meats, fish, fowl. Essentially the flesh of animals.

scb
post #12 of 22
Shel, it's really not very hard. What you merely have to remember is that, with two exceptions, neither grains nor legumes provide complete proteins.

In combination, however, they provide the balanced amino acids found in animal proteins. So, at each meal, you make a legume/grain combination. Beans & rice is certainly once such mix. Use your imagination to come up with others. Or just pick up a good vegetarian cookbook.

The exceptions, btw, are quinoa and soy beans, both of which supply complete proteins.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #13 of 22
True, but even with quinoa or soy beans, you want to vary your protein sources. That's not hard to do, and in fact hard not to do. Most of us eat more protein than we need, and that includes vegetarians.
post #14 of 22
Thread Starter 
I agree with that assessment. Years ago (Summer of 1979) I met a fellow who was very knowledgeable about nutrition, and he showed me several articles that made the same claim. Over the years I've read a number of articles and papers on the subject, and more than 20 years ago made a conscious effort to start reducing my protein intake.

scb
post #15 of 22
Barley is a nice inclusion, as is greek style yoghurt. Great substitute for sour cream.

Made a really nice green split pea soup here last night for our main meal, with lots of crusty bread, thickened the soup with rice instead of cornflour (not that it really needed it!) bit of cumin, ginger, was nice - made excess to freeze.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #16 of 22
back in the 60s i think, the book "diet for a small planet" was published, which was one of the first that really tried to scientifically come up with good plant protein sources that could be used by the human body.l My daughter stopped eating meat about 15 years ago, and while she lived at home,a nd when she visits, i have to cook for her,and i got "laurel's Kitchen" whicgh is an even better book from the scientific point of view. The point of these books is that humans can't use the protein from vegetables as they are because they are not the complete molecule strands that we need and we don't have the digestive systems to make them up (like cows, for instance). However, if you eat combinations of semi-proteins from vegetable sources, in the same meal, you will digest fully useable protein.
so
legumes and grains
(pasta and fagioli, pasta and ceci (chickpeas), lentils and rice, rice and peas, lentils and bread, or any combination of those - grains being wheat, barley, rice, corn, etc)
grains and seeds (bread with sesame, hummus (chickpeas with sesame paste), falafel (same), etc
grains or legumes with milk or egg (pasta with grated cheese, bread and cheese, polenta with cheese, or basicallyany dish with a small amount of milk product or egg, mixed with a large quantity of grain or legume) (Of ncourse milk and egg are already fully usable protein but you don't need as much)
Naturally, insofar as you can, use whole grains for more protein.

also other vegetables have a discreet amount of protein which, in combination with other foods, gives you the complete protein of meat. (pasta with broccoli, for instance) Anyway, if you're not actually still growing you don't need all that much protein.

Fortunately, since most people were too poor to eat meat for most of history, peasant food of all countries is full of plenty of great recipes. Mostlty i know the italian versions, since i live here. I can give you plenty of recipes, just ask.
PLEASE DON'T BUY THAT AWFUL FAKE MEAT - it doesn't taste like meat anyway, and has a creepy texture and is basically an industrial product.

You'd be surprised how full you feel after a nice dish of pasta and fagioli.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #17 of 22
Thread Starter 
I truly enjoy pasta (especially some whole wheat versions) with broccoli and some garlic and Reggiano. Eat it a few times month.

I don't usually eat FAKE MEAT, although there is a brand of soy chicken nuggets that I enjoy three or four times a year with hot sauce.

Pasta with chick peas - mmmm! been eating several variations of that combination since 1989.

Thanks!

scb
post #18 of 22
I've made a delicious fresh pea soup, with pureed fresh peas. I don't know the protein content of fresh peas, but since they are a legume, I imagine they're a pretty good source (?) Maybe someone can inform me on this, since I couldn't find that info.
post #19 of 22
Thread Starter 
A cup of green peas (160-grams) contains almost 9-grams of protein, slightly more than 17% of an adult's MDR.

WHFoods: Green peas

Green peas contain naturally-occurring substances
called purines. Purines are commonly found in plants,
animals, and humans. In some individuals who are
susceptible to purine-related problems, excessive
intake of these substances can cause health problems.
Since purines can be broken down to form uric acid,
excess accumulation of purines in the body can lead
to excess accumulation of uric acid. The health condition
called "gout" and the formation of kidney stones from
uric acid are two examples of uric acid-related problems
that can be related to excessive intake of purine-containing
foods. For this reason, individuals with kidney problems or
gout may want to limit or avoid intake of purine-containing
foods such as green peas.

scb
post #20 of 22
In Mexico:
- gusanos de maguey (maguey worms)



- escamoles (larvae of ants of the genus Liometopum)
post #21 of 22
I don't have kidney problems or gout, so I will continue to enjoy green peas :D

Those gusanos look really yummy um . . . .
post #22 of 22
One item you may want to experiment with are soba noodles, sort of a Japanese buckwheat pasta. Gee, I should know this, I think ubon, udon, ?? noodles are a wider, flat version of soba.

Cold in salads, or alone with a dash of hot sauce, garnished with diced green onions, or hot in various soups, or a quick stir fry with onion slivers, bell pepper, garlic, or maybe leek rings, tofu and peanuts, or a little Thai curry, lemon grass and snow peas, or ....

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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