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Cooking and reheating Pork Loin...

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I'm doing a large wedding where we'll be serving pork loin (not stuffed) in a Maple Bourbon Sauce. We're going to pre-cook the pork, cool it, and then package it in the sauce. It will be re-heated at the event.

I know that pork should be cooked to 160, but I'm concerned that the reheating will make it overcooked. I was thinking about cooking it to 150, and expect that it will carry over to 155 once out of the oven. Then, it will finish cooking once it's reheated.

Is this dangerous? Should I cook to 155 and plan on the carry over to 160, and hope for the best when it's reheated? Any advice is much appreciated!

Chef Andrea
Chef Andrea
Catering by Dinner is Served
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Chef Andrea
Catering by Dinner is Served
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post #2 of 15
To reheat anything our regs are to bring it to 175. can you fix the production so that you dont have to reheat?
post #3 of 15
I would try not to cook it prior if at all possible. If you have somewhere to reheat it you should have somewhere to cook it.

If you want you can sear it before hand (as close to before you leave as possible) cool it, transport it and finish cooking it on site.

you can guarantee that if you cook it to even 150-155 that you will have dry pork when you reheat it.
post #4 of 15
the pigs I use have a significant amount of fat around the loin, and are marbled. They reheat with no dryness.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the replies. Not cooking the meat isn't an option. It's a long story, but I'm not going to be at the event, I'm handing off the food to another caterer (Please, no comments, it seemed like a good idea at the time).

Since the meat will be in a sauce and re-heated in the sauce, I think I can prevent it from drying out. I'm just going to have to hope for the best. In the future, I won't agree to this type of arrangement.

Chef Andrea
Chef Andrea
Catering by Dinner is Served
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Chef Andrea
Catering by Dinner is Served
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post #6 of 15
Chef Andrea, Sounds like you got things on lock. The only thing that I would watch out for is the fat from the pork comming out during the reheating process. You said that your going to cook the pork, pan it up with the sauce and reheat in the oven. Pending how thick your sauce is you will probably get a 1/4'' of grease floating on your pork, you should be sure to give extra sauce to the caterer whos picking, just in case.
post #7 of 15
If you take pork loin to 175 degrees, it'll be ruined.

Definitely, cook to internal 150, then pull from the ovens to rest. The internal will easily rise to 155. Then reheat to 160. Most pork loin is actually quite palatable at 165.

But, you know what? A certain way to be sure that your reputation is safe and the pork is cooked properly is to dash off to your local A&P, buy a loin and give it a trial.

Frankly, I think it's hardly "cricket" to experiment at someone's wedding. Clearly, this is a new endeavor for you. Don't guess or seek cyber guidance, when cooking a loin will give you a far more accurate answer.
post #8 of 15
I hope that before you "hope for the best" you consult with your client.
post #9 of 15
Pork is as safe as beef. From a safety standpoint, you may cook and serve it rare, if you like. You wont like, but you can. Most people prefer the texture of modern pork loin when it finishes at or above 155. Modern pork loin goes from moist to dry at just slightly over 165. I'd pull at 152, wrap immediately in saran wrap, and allow to coast in a prepared, insulated cooler.

No matter what I like, you're the boss. Cook to your desired doneness. But, you might as well know: Once it's cooked, it's cooked. You can't cook it more, you can't cook pork loin in parts. You can only ruin it by overcooking during the reheat.

Bottom line on misinformation:

Don't try to cook it more. Don't reheat to 160. Also, in my opinion, it's a mistake to pack the loin in the sauce. Big mistake. Monster.


Here's how:

Reheat to just barely hot enough to serve -- about 125 internal or maybe a little less. Don't worry about the temperature, the first cooking created the texture and the appearance. Because the meat's already been over 140, there's no safety reason to push it there again. For meat like loin, you're generally better reheating at a moderate temp -- 325F - 350F.

Heat the sauce separately. As hot as you can get it without ruining it. Slice the meat, plate, and sauce on the plate -- just like they do in civilized countries. Because sauce is a lot more robust than meat, let the hot sauce carry some of the burden of bringing heat to the meat, and bringing warm meat to the table. The sauce is your friend.

Good luck,
BDL
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http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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What were we talking about?
 
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post #10 of 15


In a home kitchen, or in a restaurant with a few platings that may work. At a catered event, such as this wedding; particularly one that is plated, not buffet, by the time the pork is sliced, plated, and served, the bride's father would be in the kitchen screaming that the food is being served cold.
post #11 of 15
I'm not certain what "modern" means. Always know from where you are sourcing your meat. There are innumerable breeds of hogs and ways they're fed prior to slaughter. The fat content of both the loin meat and the surrounding tissue will seriously impact the meat's moisture and how it reacts to heat.
If you're even considering a tight wrap, purchase the special wrapping material designed for that purpose. Personally, I would never use Saran Wrap on any hot food item. The material specially designed for such wrapping is nylon and comprised of the same material as Reynolds Roasting Bags. They do not "off-gas" as do Saran or some of the plastic wraps. It's messy and can make slicing quite dangerous. Besides, alot of the guests may prefer not to have this sauce on their meat. Most folks are sophisticated enough to know that pre-sauced meat may be suspect. "Hmm, gosh, Roy, what do think they're covering up?" I think there will be plenty fat from the loins to slather over them before wrapping and transport.
post #12 of 15
My Question Is How Many Guests Attending The Wedding, And Why Can't The Meat Be Cooked And Pulled As Close To Delivery By The Caterer Hired. What About The Other Dishes Being Served, Don't They Deserve The Same Time Consideration, Not Discussed. I Agree That Sauce Isn't The Answer. I'm A Novice Cook That Has Come To Find Out That Most People Enjoy The Meat Not The Sauce. I Just Don't Know What Is Used To Transport The Food To The Event.
post #13 of 15
Andrea, don't you have cambros? I've catered weddings with carving stations and cambros work extremely well at holding meat at temp.

I'm not a fan of hot boxes or Queen Mary's.....much prefer cambros.

Most rental companies would have portable ovens available but your post reads like you have ovens on site to "reheat".
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #14 of 15
Yes to Cambros. Regular el-cheapo Coleman clones work pretty well too, if warmed with hot water before using; have the excess air space filled with towels or crumpled paper after the food is loaded; and the lid is attached tight to the bottom with bungee cords, duct tape or other culinary specialty products.

By "modern pork" I mean "The Other White Meat." Since the sixties American breeders and packers have gone to great lengths to raise leaner, "healthier" pork. Not all breeders, there are specialty exceptions -- but they're specialty exceptions. I figured if Andrea was using Japanese style pork or some other exotic she (a) probably wouldn't be asking; or (b) would have mentioned it.

I've used whatever the cling wrap is that's sold at Smart and Final in the 500' rolls for this purpose forever. I learned the technique in BBQ comp a long time ago from someone older than me who, therefore, ought to be respected. I'm a little perturbed to hear the product outgasses at storage temperatures. Are there any references discussing this and health effects?

It's been over a month since the original post I figure those of us who are still talking are beating a dead horse.

Andrea if you get this, how did it go?

BDL
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http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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post #15 of 15
LOL
duct tape...you are so guy.....actually I've got clear tape, masking tape, dbl sided tape as well as duct tape in "the go-to bag"....wouldn't go on a job without it.

So is Berkshire another word for Japanese pork.....some brokers are trying to get my pig farmer supplier to raise and sell 900 organic berkshires a week to ship over to Japan.
Frankly the mix of heirloom pigs this guy raises works for me....great flavor, excellant layer of fat, marbling, price....what more could a girl ask for?
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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