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airbrush

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
By no means am I a prof. baker, but I do quit a bit. however I am a caterer. I have had a client request shortbread cookies with a logo on them. What is the least complicated way to get that done by May 30th? HELP!!!
post #2 of 9
Describe the logo. I do cookies like this all the time. There are several ways, but how many colors in the logo, how simple or complex is the design etc etc will give me a better idea of what advice to offer. Do you have any decorating skill at all?
Give some more info. It is possible. I went from not knowing I had to do cookies at all on Tuesday morning to having 150 five inch cookies (idividually wrapped) with the bride and groom's monogram on them all delivered Friday morning. So time wise you can do it.
You can always print the logo onto sugar paper (must have a printer dedicated to food color) I don't have one, but the one time I needed it a local cake shop printed what I needed for a reasonable fee.
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
The cookies are fairly small shortbread about 3 or 4 inches. The Logo is the letter H with two swords at the bottom, it's the Episcopal High School Logo. The H is Dark Green with Royal Blue Outline and the Swords are Silver with Black Handles. I was Just thinking of do 2 Colors, that being Green for the H and Black for the Swords. Or Just doing the H. So the logo is pretty simple, I just dont know how to get it on the cookie! I looked into an Airbrush Machine that way I can use a stencil and apply it that way. On Pastrychef.com they had "color spray" not sure if thats a good route. I have basic decorating skills, but I need these to look fabulous, not like a 7yr old did them! Oh and I only need to make about 6 or 7 dozen.
post #4 of 9
Stick with the plain H. don’t mess with the swords, but possibly have it be the two colors (blue and green).
Can you pipe a fairly straight line and a “shell border”? If yes to these then I recommend the following:
Bake cookies
Then whip up a double batch of royal icing. Tint the entire batch the dark green. Load a pastry bag with a #3 round tip (that is the Wilton tip #) and pipe the out line of the H like a block letter on the cookie. You will be flooding this with thinned out royal icing so make sure that there are no gaps. Try to keep them uniform, that is the hard part.
When you have outlined all of the cookies, thin out the remaining royal icing with water. Add the water a little at a time. The consistency you are looking for is: when the thinned icing falls back on to itself it disappears after a ten count. Don’t go too soupy, but make sure it disappears into itself at a ten count.
Load the thinned out icing into a pastry bag with no tip. Cut a small opening in the pastry bag, not much bigger than the hole in a #4 tip and use this to flood the outlined Hs. Be neat and don’t let any spill over the “dam” you created with the outline. Let these dry completely. Could take a few hours, could take overnight. It depends on the environment.
When the icing is dry, whip up another batch of royal icing and tint it blue. Load the blue icing into a pastry bag fit with a #3 round tip and pipe a small shell border around the edge of the H.
Let them dry.
Too much work? Then:
Take the stencil you were going to use for airbrushing and make a batch of royal icing (do you see a trend here?) tint the entire batch green.
Lay the stencil over the cookie and with an off set spatula spread the royal icing over the stencil, then smooth it like you would if you were icing a cake smooth. Carefully pull the stencil off the cookie, repeat.
You can still pipe a blue border around a stenciled letter.
Hope this helps.
post #5 of 9
I've used a cannon printer with edible ink and rice paper. It's like a photo.

Tastyfotoart.com. ink

cakedeco.com. rice paper

staples.com or officedepot.com. printer
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
post #6 of 9
I wouldn't invest in the special printer unless you plan to offer cookies and/or cakes utilizing that technology on a regular basis. If you do, the printer and icing sheets might save you considerable time.

I think for this particular job, and the fact that all you really have to do is a simple "H", the instructions that izbnso gave you are right on.:crazy:
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Last time i made royal icing though, it "flooded" but it did not dry properly so the cookies could not be stacked. WHat about airbrush? Where can I get edible ink? if I choose to go that way...how do i transfer after printing them?
post #8 of 9
use less liquid in your royal icing.

the printer is $69 and the ink is about $100 for the paper and ink.
you can then offer this to all customers and it's great for custom edible menus, decorations and edible photos.

you can put the edible print out onto the cookie with a small, even amount of royal icing on the cookie, then place the picture, turn upside down to keep edges from curling, turn back over to dry for a day and package.
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
post #9 of 9
tastyfotoart.com for the ink
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
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