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chef's clogs - Page 2

post #31 of 38

I've been wearing Keen closed back clogs for a while. My orthotics fit and they have a non-slip, non-marking sole. 

They are also lighter than the Dansko clogs and bend a lot more. 

They started out a little tight across the instep as I have a high arch, but I sprayed them until very damp with a 50-50 alcohol/water mix and wore them with thick hiking socks until dry.

Now they fit and feel like slippers and I can work a full day on my feet without crying at the end of the day.

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Liquored up and laquered down,
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www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

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post #32 of 38

I never understood the clog fad. Closed leather SafeTsteps with Dr. Shoes inserts work fine for me. No inserts and they are unbearable after 16 hours.

Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
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Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
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post #33 of 38
Quote:
I never understood the clog fad.

When I started in the business 37 years ago this so called fad was well established and it still is today! Imagine that.The fact that you can not understand it doesn't mean it has diminished validity.

 

The only time that I have worn anything other than clogs in the kitchen, was when I went to culinary school where they were forbidden for students, but not the instructors, due to insurance purposes. I couldn't wait to graduate so that I could go back to wearing clogs. More comfortable and less fatigue for me than lace up. Easier to keep clean. No laces to come undone and be a possible hazard.

 

I have enjoyed Dansko, Bastad, and Birkenstock, but my favorite would be Crocs Bistro (non- slip sole). Long days with them are no problem, plus at the end of the day I can run them under hot water and clean them.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #34 of 38

Never did like them.  I was "expected" to wear them during my apprenticeship , but one trip down a flight of 3 steps made me throw them out in the trash, and to this day, never tried on another pair.

 

Employers have tried to make me "see the light", but since I wear custom orthotics, I can't find any with a flat inside to support my orthotics, and since many of them are made of vinyl or some other nasty material I run away from them.  Then agan, a lot of clogs don't have "lateral stability" and flex sideways not giving any support to the orthotics.  Usually a note from my Podaitrist stops this "Clogs are great, all employees must wear them" Boule-Cheet, and I get left alone.

 

Everyone's feet are different.  What works for one doesn't work for another.

...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #35 of 38

Chefbuba:

I wear steel-toed boots or shoes, and I would move my foot rather quickly than testing the effectiveness of my steel-toe cap.

If a cleaver was falling towards my foot. I would suggest that next time, move your foot! Steel-toe caps do not provide complete protection.

MythBusters: Steel Toe Amputation

 

I concur with Foodpump. I would never wear clogs! Nonetheless, for those of you who do, try the KM 1500 Clog instead of Shoes For Crews.

About KM Shoes

What Makes KM Shoes So Great?

Take A Closer Look at Our Features!

Something to Think About...

Slip-Resistant Shoe Ratings


Edited by TheUnknownCook - 2/16/11 at 4:00pm
post #36 of 38

Well opinions are as different as you can imagine. I wore Birkenstocks for years, never really liked them or found them comfortable. This notion that clogs are great and comfortable for long days on your feet I find curious. I liked the fact that they were rubber and pretty indestructible and I could walk across a floor covered in oil and not slip. The inserts had to be changed twice a year and cost $40. In this lousy industry which pays poorer than most that is a stretch. I had not worked in a while and took my clogs to work one day and kept them in a locker. By the end of the day I walked out to the garbage and tossed them forever more. I will never buy or wear those clogs so long I live. I won't wear those stupid Crocs in a kitchen or anywhere else. I now wear Blundstone boots. sad part is I'd like to keep a pair at work and I don't want to leave those boots there because I wear them all the time. So I guess I'd like to find something to wear and for some reason that I will never understand, chefs/cooks wear clogs. I'll keep looking but not sure I will ever find something I'll like.

post #37 of 38

where in canada do you live? they are $100 here in vancouver not sure why they would be more expensive anywhere else.

post #38 of 38

My brother had a big basketball goal fall on his feet which were clad in steel toes.  The steel curled and cut into his feet.  The doc at the emergency room said he was lucky his toes were not severed.   If you work around HEAVY stuff, (as in a frozen slab of some beef)  be careful with those.

 

I work on my feet all day too (embroidery - no you cannot sit down at a commercial 300+ lb machine, you have to stand).  I don't have to change environments, room temp all day, so I might try some clogs. I do use a steamer, but only after all the work is done. 

 

Not Croks, though.  I hate the way those feel on my feet.  Something breathable, I think.

 

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