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Ramekin or Dish?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I am going to make a crustless quiche and want to know what the preferred method is for cooking it. Would it be a ramekin or a dish? The ramekin is a small dish/bowl for individual servings where the dish is much bigger and will make a quiche the size of a pie and then individual slices are cut and served on the plate. Thank you.
post #2 of 13
Is that not a frittatta/Tortilla??
If I'm showing my ignorance, please enlighten.
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

Ramekin or Dish

A crustless quiche and Frittata are very similar. A quiche usually is a pie with a crust made with eggs and ingredients like bacon, mushrooms, spinach and cheese. A frittata is really like a crustless quiche with the same ingredients. A tortilla is completely different and is used a lot in Mexican cuisine. It is a thin disk of bread made from wheat flower and baked on a hot surface. It is usually used to wrap around other ingredients.
post #4 of 13
In Spain, tortilla is generic for omelette. A tortilla de espana (sorry, no tilda on this board) aka tortilla de papas is incredibly typical of bar and home food. In Spain, tortillas are made "pancake" style, by sliding the half cooked omelette out of the pan onto a plate, then inverting it back into the pan. In other words, it's cooked in a pan on top of the stove and not in an oven. Tortillas are usually more fluffy than custard-like. In Spain, tortilla can refer to pancake as well (also panqueque and tortita).

In Mexico, the term "tortilla" usually does apply to unleavened flat bread. But also means omelette, pancake and pie. The commonality is "flat and round." Here, in the US of A, "Neighbors to the North" as we are, we usually only hear the term applied to the bread. FWIW, almost all Mexican tortillas are made from corn, i.e., tortillas de maiz. Flour tortillas, tortillas de harina are a custom which began here in el Norte. Chicanos and Mexicanos mostly reserve them for burritos. For whatever reason gabachos, a term most gabachos confuse with gringos, seem to prefer tortillas de harina generally. I'm not favoring one or the other, it's purely personal preference and not a matter of virture. That's just how the ethnic groups trend.

A frittata is partially cooked on the stove top, and partly in the oven. The texture falls somewhere between airy and rich.

A quiche is cooked entirely in the stove. It is a custard and not an omelette.

Hope this helps,
BDL
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
Can someone answer my original question? Thanks
post #6 of 13
Other than personal preference, no difference really. Adjust cooking times for depth and volume. I'd cook in a water bath to prevent the bottom from scorching and getting too dry. Remember, you want the eggs very smooth and not fluffy.

BDL
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks! I also learned something about tortillas.
post #8 of 13
This may or may not help your situation, but for parties I'll often do a regular crusted quiche and then 2 - 3 crustless ramekins on the side. We have a number of friends with wheat gluten issues, they appreciate the individual servings. I'd lean towards the smaller bowls, a crustless quiche in a pie pan or whatever might be a bit more difficult to slice and plate up neatly.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #9 of 13
Good point. The cheese firms it up better than flan, but ... If you're going to serve it at room temp after a long rest, slicing and lifting from a tart pan isn't that difficult as long as you cut to fit your spatula. However, if you're planning on serving it relatively "hot from the oven," I doubt it would hold together well at all (I've never tried it). Teamfat's right again -- erm, still. Individual servings would solve a lot of plating problems. Just, for heaven's sake use a water bath unless you want dry, curdled scrambled eggs with a lump of stringy cheese at the bottom.

Quiche is all about silky texture. Otherwise it's a Denver omelet at 10 times the trouble.

Brought to you at great expense to the management,
BDL
post #10 of 13

chefedb

PREFERED METHOD? I dont think there is a prefered method. It would be up to you and your judgement as to what looks better and is easier to serve. Remember though that cooking the mixture in a deeper dish requires more time before it sets correctly, and cooking it in to shallow a plate could toughen it.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #11 of 13
Frittatas are handy - you can start them in the pan on the stove top and finish under the grill/broiler, or flip them onto a dish, back into the pan and finish on stove top.

Also, they can be served hot, but hold together and I believe taste much better warm/room temp, much the same as a quiche. Cut into wedges and serve.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #12 of 13
Absolutely.
I made on this morning with par-boiled potatoes, asparagus and peppers for a lunch. It's gluten free too, so appeals to the latest fad. (pardon my sarcasm) It's so much less bother than a quiche.
By the way, does anyone have a way of cutting down on the quiche prep. ie. make pastry, chill, roll out and put in tray, chill, blind bake, repair,cook off
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #13 of 13
I don't think there are any short cuts - pastry is pastry and will always be so. Tha's why I love frittatas :) no pastry but you can get it crusty top and bottom.
I don't make pastry unless it is a life or death situation :roll:
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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