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How many courses is too many?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
This year I've been to a coupla places that serve a multiple course prix fixe meal, and what I got out of it, well, not a whole lot. Face it, I'm old fashioned, and although I appreciate the artistry of a well designed plate, I cannot whet my appetite on half a poussin breast sliced in half and served on a bite of salad. WHERE'S THE REST OF THE BIRD??? :D This after a nice diamond shaped piece of turbot, again served atop another "ragout" of some random bean. WHERE'S THE REST OF THE FISH? :D

Anyway after about five of these types of courses I figure I'd had enough. Nothing was memorable, nothing served as the highlight of the meal. Instead it's just one artistic, and don't get me wrong, tasty, presentation after another, paired with wines of course.

So my question to you folks is: How do you like to dine? Do you prefer many courses, each artfully prepared, where one dish melds into the next, or do you prefer more traditional dining where one or two dishes are the focal point of the meal?
post #2 of 13
Personally I'm like you Kuan. I prefer a traditonal meal App, Salad, entree etc. Typical French service. I love a lot of little dishes too, but to me that's not a meal, it's a party.
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post #3 of 13
I enjoy both depending on my mood, but overall prefer the more traditional presentation of appetizer, salad, main course, soup, etc. Actually, I really like ordering just one or two dishes, like a salad or soup and main dish.

shel
post #4 of 13
I do like the multi corase smaller plates but that works with the way i eat.

but honestly back in teh day i was a app entree and neverh ad room for dessert.

a prefix menu unless thats what they do is usually IMO half assed most the times.
post #5 of 13
I think the classical rule was 15 or 16 courses, just a tad too many for me though.

The modern interpretation of the mini-plates is, of course, business oriented, as you will pay more for a 5 or 7 course menu degustation (sp?) than for a 3 or 4 courser. Factor in the wine, (of which you can sell more too, as each course goes with a different wine...) and you can easily drop $2-$300 (for two) as compared to $1-$150 (for two) for a 3 courser and single decent bottle of wine.

Meh. If it's good food, I enjoy it, but I can never do a 5 or 7 courser with the wife more than once every two years--those tiny plates drive her nuts....
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post #6 of 13
Is it the size of the plates or the amount of food. lol
post #7 of 13
I might go against the grain here, but I personally really like a small taste of many different things -- particularly when the menu is creative and fresh. I'm all about trying news things and flavor combos, so I enjoy it for that reason.

There are times, tho, when I'm going in for a favorite, and don't you dare give me anything but that -- and in it's full size, too!

So, like another post, it's all about my mood.:chef:
post #8 of 13
Well, I like to taste different types of foods. So, it would be better if I can have many courses rather than the traditional dining.

Is all about the variety of foods, which the merrier the better for me here.
post #9 of 13
A friend of mine only last week cookek and beatifully presented eight courses!

I must say that my the fifth i was well and truly stufffed. Needless to say i battled on until coffee was served, to be polite, if nothing else!;)
post #10 of 13
comfort food - app. salad. entree dessert.

other - as many small courses as I can get!
post #11 of 13
It depends on my mood...I too, do some small serves of something when I do a course meal/dinner but with careful planning. Sometimes I would do a large plate of "pick-a-choose" as I call it, where smaller portions are in large plates, aka tasting portions...though I accompany these with wine so if there is something that some guests do not like, at least I get them drunk enough to notice...:lol:
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post #12 of 13
To get it out of the way, depends on my mood, of course. But if I had to choose it would be a diversity of small plates. Gimme a free evening and a tapas bar and I'm in culinary heaven.

But I'm a bit confused. To me it sounds like Kuan is describing a tasting, not a prix fixe meal.

Prix fixe, to me, means a menu predetermined by the chef. Those restaurants I've had them it's usually called it 5-courses, consisting of an appetizer, soup, entree (often a choice there of fish and either meat or fowl), veggie, and dessert. Wine or other beverages are not included.

Portions are the same as if you'd ordered from a menu.

Only difference between prix fixe and a standard restaurant is that you pay a set price and eat what's set before you, rather than choosing from a menu.

Both the prix fixe and tastings are ways for a chef to strut his stuff. But they are totally different in format and style.
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post #13 of 13
That confused me a little too.


The prix fixe that I've had have also been full size portions that are picked by the Chef. The tasting menu's can get a little annoying.

The last time we went out to eat was for Italian food, in Chicago. What they did for us (table of four) was to serve the appetizer as a tasting for each of us. That way everyone would get to sample what their appetizers were like. When it came to the main entree's the waiter recommended against setting it up as a tasting and instead suggested (after talking with us) that we try a pasta and truffle tasting. This was great and gave everyone a good sampling of their lighter pasta and truffle pairings. Then we were left to enjoy the main meal by ourselves...even though we tried some off of each plate ;)


What bothers me more is that you can spend $150 on up (for two) and you get tastings (or meals) that are so so. well...gotta go work


take care,
dan
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